2016 Masters (snooker) snooker tournament

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Dafabet Masters
Tournament information
Dates10–17 January 2016
VenueAlexandra Palace
CityLondon
CountryEngland
Organisation(s)WPBSA
FormatNon-ranking event
Total prize fund£600,000
Winner's share£200,000
Highest breakEngland Judd Trump (140)
Final
ChampionEngland Ronnie O'Sullivan
Runner-upEngland Barry Hawkins
Score10–1
2015
2017

The 2016 Masters (also referred to as the 2016 Dafabet Masters for the purposes of sponsorship) was a professional non-ranking snooker tournament that took place between 10 and 17 January 2016 at the Alexandra Palace in London, England.[1] It was the 42nd staging of the Masters tournament and the fifth successive time it was held at the Alexandra Palace.

The defending champion Shaun Murphy lost 4–6 against Mark Allen in the first round.[2] Murphy forfeited the sixth frame of the match by missing a red on three consecutive occasions.[3]

The quarter-final between Judd Trump and Neil Robertson produced six century breaks, setting a new record for the most centuries in an 11-frame match.[4] These included the two highest breaks of the tournament, 140 from Trump and 139 from Robertson. The match was singled out for particular praise, with John Virgo calling it one of the greatest in Masters history.[5]

Playing in his first major televised tournament since taking an eight-month hiatus from professional snooker, Ronnie O'Sullivan reached his eleventh Masters final and won the tournament for a sixth time, equalling Stephen Hendry's record for the most Masters titles.[6] Losing only the first frame, he defeated Barry Hawkins 10–1, the biggest winning margin since Steve Davis whitewashed Mike Hallett 9–0 in 1988,[7] and the first time a player had won ten consecutive frames in a Masters final.[8]

Field

Defending champion Shaun Murphy was the number 1 seed with World Champion Stuart Bingham seeded 2. The remaining places were allocated to players based on the world rankings after the 2015 UK Championship. Liang Wenbo made his debut at the Masters after he entered the top 16 due to reaching the final of the 2015 UK Championship.

Prize fund

The breakdown of prize money is shown below:

  • Winner: £200,000
  • Runner-up: £90,000
  • Semi-finals: £50,000
  • Quarter-finals: £25,000
  • Last 16: £12,500
  • Highest break: £10,000
  • Total: £600,000

Main draw

Last 16
Best of 11 frames
Quarter-finals
Best of 11 frames
Semi-finals
Best of 11 frames
Final
Best of 19 frames
            
1 England Shaun Murphy 4
11 Northern Ireland Mark Allen 6
11 Northern Ireland Mark Allen 2
8 England Barry Hawkins 6
8 England Barry Hawkins 6
10 England Joe Perry 3
8 England Barry Hawkins 6
5 England Judd Trump 4
5 England Judd Trump 6
16 Scotland Stephen Maguire 4
5 England Judd Trump 6
4 Australia Neil Robertson 5
4 Australia Neil Robertson 6
14 Hong Kong Marco Fu 0
8 England Barry Hawkins 1
6 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 10
3 England Mark Selby 6
12 England Ricky Walden 0
3 England Mark Selby 3
6 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 6
6 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 6
13 Wales Mark Williams 5
6 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 6
2 England Stuart Bingham 3
7 Scotland John Higgins 6
15 China Liang Wenbo 4
7 Scotland John Higgins 3
2 England Stuart Bingham 6
2 England Stuart Bingham 6
9 China Ding Junhui 4

Final

Final: Best of 19 frames. Referee: Belgium Olivier Marteel.
Alexandra Palace, London, England, 17 January 2016.
Barry Hawkins (8)
 England
1–10 Ronnie O'Sullivan (6)
 England
Afternoon: 66–50, 8–97 (70), 0–136 (136), 49–73 (52), 28–72, 36–64, 17–77 (77), 13–72 (72)
Evening: 39–58, 0–92 (66), 0–82 (82)
48 Highest break 136
0 Century breaks 1
0 50+ breaks 7

Century breaks

Total: 26[9]

References

  1. ^ "Dafabet Masters 2016". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Retrieved 8 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Shaun Murphy loses in first round at Masters after forfeiting frame". The Guardian. 11 January 2016. Retrieved 19 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Masters 2016: Shaun Murphy forfeits frame with three fouls". BBC Sport. 10 January 2016. Retrieved 19 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Trump Wins 'Greatest Ever' Masters Match". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 15 January 2016. Retrieved 20 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Masters: Judd Trump wins thriller as Bingham also progresses". BBC Sport. 15 January 2016. Retrieved 19 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan beats Barry Hawkins to win sixth title". BBC Sport. 17 January 2016. Retrieved 19 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan crushes Barry Hawkins 10-1 for sixth Masters title". The Guardian. 17 January 2016. Retrieved 18 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan warns snooker's elder statesmen can still rack up shocks after demolition job to reclaim Masters crown". Evening Times. 18 January 2016. Retrieved 20 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Masters – Century Breaks". worldsnookerdata.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 20 January 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
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