2020 World Grand Prix snooker tournament

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2020 Coral World Grand Prix
Coral World Grand Prix Logo.png
Tournament information
Dates3–9 February 2020
VenueThe Centaur, Cheltenham Racecourse
CityCheltenham
CountryEngland
FormatRanking event
Total prize fund£380,000
Winner's share£100,000
Highest break Neil Robertson (AUS) (142)
Final
Champion Neil Robertson (AUS)
Runner-up Graeme Dott (SCO)
Score10–8
2019

The 2020 World Grand Prix was a professional snooker tournament which took place from 3 to 9 February 2020 in the Centaur at Cheltenham Racecourse in Cheltenham, England. It was the eleventh ranking event of the 2019–20 snooker season, and the first of three Coral Cup tournaments. The 2020 edition of the World Grand Prix was sponsored by the betting company Coral. The event had 32 participants, with players qualifying by virtue of their ranking points during the 2019–20 season. It had a prize fund of £380,000, with £100,000 going to the winner.

The defending champion was Judd Trump, who had beaten Ali Carter 10–6 in the 2019 final. Trump was defeated, 3–4, in the second round by Kyren Wilson. Neil Robertson won the tournament for the first time (his 18th ranking title) with a 10–8 victory against Graeme Dott in the final. It was the third consecutive final in the season for Robertson, who lost just one match in the event. It had 32 century breaks, with the highest a 142 by Robertson in the final. Scott Donaldson and Kurt Maflin made their debuts in the event.

Overview

The 2020 World Grand Prix was a professional snooker tournament held from 3 to 9 February 2020 in the Centaur at Cheltenham Racecourse, Cheltenham, England.[1][2][3] It had 32 participants from players with the most ranking points in the 2019–20 snooker season at the beginning of the tournament.[3] To qualify for the event, players were chosen from points earned in the preceding ten ranking tournaments, rather than by world rankings. Points scored at events from the 2019 Riga Masters until the 2020 German Masters added towards qualifying for the event.[4] The World Grand Prix was the first of three events in the Coral Cup, with the Players Championship and Tour Championship.[5][6] It was the eleventh ranking event of the snooker season, following the German Masters and preceding the Welsh Open.[2]

Prize fund

The event had a total prize fund of £380,000, with £100,000 to the winner. The participation prize was £5,000, which did not count towards a player's world ranking.[7] The breakdown of prize money for the event was:[7]

  • Winner: £100,000
  • Runner-up: £40,000
  • Semi-final: £20,000
  • Quarter-final: £12,500
  • Last 16: £7,500
  • Last 32: £5,000 (Prize money at this stage did not count towards prize money rankings)
  • Highest break: £10,000
  • Total: £380,000

Summary

Early rounds

The first round of the tournament was played as best-of-seven-frames matches.[8] Three-time world champion Mark Williams defeated Barry Hawkins 4–2, despite an attack of gout.[9] The 2019 UK Championship winner Ding Junhui met Scott Donaldson (after competed at the previous two tournaments: the 2020 European Masters and the 2020 German Masters), with Donaldson winning both.[10] Donaldson won the match, whitewashing Ding 4–0 and eliminating him at three straight events.[10] Second seed and 2019 China Open champion Shaun Murphy lost to Matthew Stevens, 3–4.[11]

Five-time world champion Ronnie O'Sullivan was ranked 22nd for the event, since he had missed some of the season's ranking events.[12][13] He played David Gilbert, defeating him 4–3 on a deciding frame.[14] Defending champion Judd Trump defeated Li Hang 4–1, which Sporting Life called a "demolition".[10] Sixth-seeded Mark Allen lost to Liang Wenbo 2–4, and Thepchaiya Un-Nooh lost on a deciding frame to Matthew Selt.[10] The 2020 European Masters champion Neil Robertson defeated Michael Holt 4–3, also on a deciding frame.[10] Kyren Wilson, John Higgins, Joe Perry, Graeme Dott and Tom Ford were victorious in other matches.[15]

World champion Judd Trump met 16th seed Kyren Wilson in the second round. Wilson led 3–1, before Trump won the next two frames to force a deciding frame.[16] Wilson took the deciding frame to win 4–3.[16] Ronnie O'Sullivan and Liang Wenbo also went to a deciding frame; O'Sullivan won 4–3, scoring back-to-back centuries in the first two frames.[17][18] Gary Wilson defeated Matthew Stevens 4–1; Graeme Dott and Neil Robertson completed 4–0 whitewashes of Xiao Guodong and Mark Williams, respectively.[16] Tom Ford defeated Matthew Selt, and Joe Perry defeated Scott Donaldson (both 4–2) in the other second-round matches.[15]

Quarter- and semi-finals

The quarter-finals were played as best-of-9-frames matches.[19] Kyren Wilson drew John Higgins who won the first two frames Wilson won the next two frames with breaks of 64 and 89 to tie the match, 2–2.[20] The next four frames were shared, leading to a deciding frame. Wilson made two breaks, and Higgins needed snookers to win. Although Higgins drew two fouls, Wilson won the match after potting a long brown ball.[20] Joe Perry won the first frame of his match with Neil Robertson with a break of 86 before Robertson won the next five frames to win, 5–1.[20] Ronnie O'Sullivan won the opening frame against Graeme Dott, who then won the next three frames. O'Sullivan tied the match, 3–3, with a break of 102 in frame six. Dott won the next two frames for a 5–3 victory, with breaks of 52 and 91.[21] It was Dott's first win against O'Sullivan in nine years.[21] In the other quarter-final, Tom Ford defeated Gary Wilson 5–2. After the match, he said that his form had improved due to his "mind coach".[21]

The semi-finals were played as best-of-11-frames matches. Neil Robertson won the first three frames of his match with Kyren Wilson with breaks of 80, 59 and 77.[22] Wilson then won three of the next four, including a break of 129, to trail 3–4.[22] Robertson led 5–4 before making a break of 68 to win, 6–4.[22] The second semi-final was played by Graeme Dott and Tom Ford. Dott was playing in his second consecutive semi-final, after reaching that stage at the German Masters.[23] Ford led 4–3 before Dott won three frames in a row with breaks of 81, 67 and 70 to win, 6–3.[23]

Final

Neil Robertson after playing a shot to the middle pocket
Neil Robertson (pictured) won the tournament, defeating Graeme Dott 10–8 in the final.

The final was played in two sessions as a best-of-19-frames match. Robertson was playing in his third straight ranking final, after he won the European Masters and was runner-up at the German Masters.[24] Dott had not won an event since the 2007 China Open, and last reached a ranking final in 2018. This was a rematch of the 2010 World Snooker Championship final, which Robertson had won.[24] The final was refereed by Leo Scullion.[25] Robertson took the opening frame and made a break of 63 in the second, losing the frame by six points. Dott won frame three before Robertson won four frames in a row (including a break of 127) to lead, 5–2. Dott won the final frame of the opening session to trail, 3–5.[26]

He then won two of the first three frames in the evening session to trail, 5–6. Dott scored only a single point across the next three frames, Robertson earning 313 taking all three frames.[26] Dott won the next two frames to trail, 7–9; but required two snookers in frame 17 to be able to win. Dott secured the foul shots to trail 8–9, before Robertson won frame 18 to win the match, 10–8.[27] After the match, he said that he had been a "bit twitchy" near the end.[26][28] Dott called Robertson "a machine".[27] Robertson made five century breaks during the final, including the tournament's highest break – a 142 – in frame 12.[27]

Tournament draw

The event featured five single elimination rounds featuring 32 players. Below is the bracket for the event. Players in bold denote match winners.[8][15][29]

Last 32
Best of 7 frames
Last 16
Best of 7 frames
Quarter-finals
Best of 9 frames
Semi-finals
Best of 11 frames
Final
Best of 19 frames
               
1  Judd Trump (ENG) 4
32  Li Hang (CHN) 1
1 England Judd Trump 3
16 England Kyren Wilson 4
16  Kyren Wilson (ENG) 4
17  Jack Lisowski (ENG) 3
16 England Kyren Wilson 5
9 Scotland John Higgins 4
9  John Higgins (SCO) 4
24  Stuart Bingham (ENG) 2
9 Scotland John Higgins 4
25 China Zhao Xintong 1
8  Yan Bingtao (CHN) 2
25  Zhao Xintong (CHN) 4
16 England Kyren Wilson 4
5 Australia Neil Robertson 6
5  Neil Robertson (AUS) 4
28  Michael Holt (ENG) 3
5 Australia Neil Robertson 4
12 Wales Mark Williams 0
12  Mark Williams (WAL) 4
21  Barry Hawkins (ENG) 2
5 Australia Neil Robertson 5
13 England Joe Perry 1
13  Joe Perry (ENG) 4
20  Ali Carter (ENG) 2
13 England Joe Perry 4
29 Scotland Scott Donaldson 2
4  Ding Junhui (CHN) 0
29  Scott Donaldson (SCO) 4
5 Australia Neil Robertson 10
14 Scotland Graeme Dott 8
3  Mark Selby (ENG) 3
30  Xiao Guodong (CHN) 4
30 China Xiao Guodong 0
14 Scotland Graeme Dott 4
14  Graeme Dott (SCO) 4
19  Kurt Maflin (NOR) 1
14 Scotland Graeme Dott 5
22 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 3
11  David Gilbert (ENG) 3
22  Ronnie O'Sullivan (ENG) 4
22 England Ronnie O'Sullivan 4
27 China Liang Wenbo 3
6  Mark Allen (NIR) 2
27  Liang Wenbo (CHN) 4
14 Scotland Graeme Dott 6
23 England Tom Ford 4
7  Thepchaiya Un-Nooh (THA) 3
26  Matthew Selt (ENG) 4
26 England Matthew Selt 2
23 England Tom Ford 4
10  Stephen Maguire (SCO) 3
23  Tom Ford (ENG) 4
23 England Tom Ford 5
18 England Gary Wilson 2
15  Zhou Yuelong (CHN) 1
18  Gary Wilson (ENG) 4
18 England Gary Wilson 4
31 Wales Matthew Stevens 1
2  Shaun Murphy (ENG) 3
31  Matthew Stevens (WAL) 4

Final

Final: Best of 19 frames. Referee: Scotland Leo Scullion
The Centaur, Cheltenham Racecourse, Cheltenham, England, 9 February 2020
Neil Robertson (5)
 Australia
10–8 Graeme Dott (14)
 Scotland
Afternoon: 70–9 (55), 67–69 (Robertson 63), 1–102 (56), 127–0 (127), 68–22, 110–0 (110), 63–21 (58), 41–58
Evening: 32–101 (62), 138–0 (107), 8–88 (88), 142–0 (142), 70–1 (69), 101–0 (101), 43–66, 37–65, 73–77 (Robertson 69), 70–17
142 Highest break 88
5 Century breaks 0
10 50+ breaks 3

Century breaks

A total of 33 century breaks were made at the tournament. The highest was a 142, made by Neil Robertson in frame 13 of the final.[30]

References

  1. ^ "Calendar 2019/2020" (PDF). World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 18 July 2018. Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 September 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Calendar 2019/2020". snooker.org. Archived from the original on 23 July 2019. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Coral World Grand Prix". World Snooker. 9 March 2015. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  4. ^ "1 Year Ranking List". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 7 February 2017. Retrieved 8 February 2019.
  5. ^ "Coral To Sponsor New Snooker Series". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 21 November 2018. Archived from the original on 22 November 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  6. ^ "World Grand Prix Snooker 2020: Draw, schedule, betting odds, results & TV coverage". Sporting Life. UK. 9 February 2020.
  7. ^ a b "Indicative Prize Money Rankings Schedule 2018/2019 Season" (PDF). worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 18 July 2018. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 September 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Results (World Grand Prix 2020)". snooker.org.
  9. ^ "Mark Williams defies gout to beat Barry Hawkins at World Grand Prix". BBC Sport. 6 February 2020. Archived from the original on 7 February 2020. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  10. ^ a b c d e "Snooker results: Judd Trump eases through; Ding Junhui whitewashed by Scott Donaldson". Sporting Life. 5 February 2020. Archived from the original on 6 February 2020. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  11. ^ "LIVE Shaun Murphy – Matthew Stevens – World Grand Prix". Eurosport Asia. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  12. ^ "Rocket Returns – And Wins With A Century". World Snooker. 3 February 2020. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  13. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan Survives Again in World Grand Prix". SnookerHQ. 6 February 2020. Retrieved 19 February 2020. The “Rocket” is making his first appearance in a tournament this year after opting out of the Masters in January.
  14. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan and Judd Trump out of World Grand Prix". BBC Sport. 6 February 2020. Archived from the original on 7 February 2020. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  15. ^ a b c "Draw | World Snooker Live Scores". livescores.worldsnookerdata.com. Archived from the original on 2 February 2020. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  16. ^ a b c Coley, Ben (6 February 2020). "Snooker results: Kyren Wilson beats Judd Trump 4–3 in Coral World Grand Prix". Sporting Life. UK. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  17. ^ "Snooker news – O'Sullivan sees off Liang comeback to reach World Grand Prix quarter-finals". Eurosport UK (published 2 June 2020). 6 February 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  18. ^ "LIVE Ronnie O'Sullivan – Liang Wenbo – World Grand Prix". Eurosport UK (published 5 February 2020). 2 May 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  19. ^ "World Grand Prix Snooker 2020: Draw, schedule, betting odds, results & TV coverage". Sporting Life. UK. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  20. ^ a b c "Coral World Grand Prix snooker results: Neil Robertson beats Joe Perry 5–1; Kyren Wilson beats John Higgins". Sporting Life. UK. 14 February 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  21. ^ a b c "Outsider Dott shocks Rocket in World Grand Prix". Sporting Life. UK. 7 February 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  22. ^ a b c "World Grand Prix: Neil Robertson through to face Graeme Dott in final". BBC Sport. 8 February 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  23. ^ a b "Graeme Dott beats Tom Ford to reach World Grand Prix final". BBC Sport. 7 February 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  24. ^ a b Caulfield, David (9 February 2020). "World Grand Prix Final: Neil Robertson vs Graeme Dott". SnookerHQ. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  25. ^ Ardalen, Hermund. "Results (World Grand Prix 2020)". snooker.org (in Norwegian). Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  26. ^ a b c "World Grand Prix: Neil Robertson beats Graeme Dott 10–8 in final". BBC Sport. 9 February 2020. Archived from the original on 10 February 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  27. ^ a b c 9 February 2020 (9 February 2020). "Dott Dashed By Five–Ton Robertson". World Snooker. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  28. ^ Caufield, David (9 February 2020). "Neil Robertson Wins 2020 World Grand Prix". Snookerhq.com (published 10 February 2020). Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  29. ^ "World Grand Prix (2020) – Brackets". snooker.org. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  30. ^ "Centuries | World Snooker Live Scores". livescores.worldsnookerdata.com. Archived from the original on 2 February 2020. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
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