American Song Contest

song contest and television programme

Encyclopedia from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

American Song Contest
American Song Contest logo.png
Title card
GenreMusic competition
Created byEuropean Broadcasting Union
Based onEurovision Song Contest
Presented by
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes8
Production
Executive producers
Production locationsNBCUniversal Lot, Universal City, California[2]
Running time86 minutes
Production companies
Release
Original networkNBC
Picture format1080i (HDTV)
Original releaseMarch 21, 2022 (2022-03-21) –
present
Infobox instructions (only shown in preview)

American Song Contest is an American music reality competition television series based on the Eurovision Song Contest. It sees all 50 U.S. states, five territories, and Washington, D.C. compete for the title of Best Original Song. The contest took place between March 21 and May 9, 2022, and aired on NBC.[3] The show is hosted by Snoop Dogg and Kelly Clarkson.[2]

The contest was won by Oklahoma with the song "Wonderland" by singer AleXa.

Format

Variety reported in 2020 that the competition would feature professional musical artists such as solo singers, duos, or groups of up to six members from each of the 50 U.S. states. The format puts artists head-to-head against other representatives in a series of qualifier competitions, leading to the semi-finals and the primetime final in "March Madness" style.[4]

Deadline Hollywood reported in 2021 that the format had been expanded to include all 50 U.S. states, all five populated U.S. territories, and Washington, D.C., the national capital and a federal district of the U.S. The participating territories are American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each representative performs an original song in a live television program broadcast across the country.[5] Acts can consist of solo artists, duos, bands or a DJ.[6]

The competition involved five episodes of qualifying rounds, followed by two episodes of semi-finals and one final.[7] In each qualifying round, a 56-member jury of music industry professionals (one for each state and territory) selects one song to advance to the semi-finals, while three songs also advance after a 35-hour viewer voting period, which Variety claimed would be determined through a combination of jury and fan votes.[8] After the qualifying rounds, the jury selects two "redemption songs" to join in the semi-finals, thus a total of 22 acts remain in the competition. The same selection process is facilitated in the semi-finals to determine the 10 acts that will compete in the final. The final results are being presented in Eurovision style, with each jury member awarding their 12 points then adding in the viewers' points.[9] The viewer votes are weighted, with each state and territory being worth 12 points much like in Eurovision, thus giving all regions equal voting power while preventing populous states like California and Texas from dominating the voting process.[10][11] The winning act earns the title of Best Original Song.[12]

Production

Background

The Eurovision Song Contest is an international song competition organized annually by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) since 1956, which features participants representing primarily European countries. It ranks among the world's most-watched non-sporting events every year, with hundreds of millions of viewers globally.[13]

The earliest known telecast of Eurovision in the continental U.S. was in 1971.[14] Two years earlier, the contest was telecast in Puerto Rico for the first time.[15] The contest was broadcast in both countries in 2003 and 2004.[16][17]

U.S. cable network Logo TV broadcast the finals from 2016 to 2018, featuring commentary from Carson Kressley and Michelle Collins (2016); Michelle Visage and Ross Mathews (2017); and Mathews and Shangela (2018).[18][19][20] Viewing figures were low, ranging from 52,000 viewers in 2016 to 74,000 viewers in 2018.[21] WJFD-FM, a commercial radio station in New Bedford, Massachusetts, broadcast the 2018 and 2019 finals with English and Portuguese commentary.[22][23]

Netflix licensed the video-on-demand rights for the 2019 and 2020 contests.[24] The OTT platform planned to release the musical comedy film Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga together with the 2020 contest. However, because of the contest's cancellation due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the film was released a month later, on June 26.[25] The film became the most-streamed content on Netflix in the U.S. on its first weekend.[26] The Story of Fire Saga also introduced viewers to the Eurovision format and its popularity in Europe. A song from the film, "Husavik", was nominated for Best Original Song at the 93rd Academy Awards.[27]

There were plans to develop an US version of Eurovision as early as 2006, with Ben Silverman (then chairman of production company Reveille) developing the contest for NBC to challenge American Idol.[28] Silverman (currently co-CEO and chairman of production company Propagate) admitted in 2020 that he had been trying to pursue this project for 20 years, including when he was chairman of NBC.[29]

Development

In an interview with Billboard, Christer Björkman and Anders Lenhoff revealed that they discussed creating a United States version of the Eurovision Song Contest after producing the 2017 competition in Kyiv, Ukraine. Lenhoff brought up the idea, to which Björkman was hesitant, saying: "Why would we do that and how would that work?" Despite the initial rejection, Lenhoff persisted with the concept, adding: "It sounds like a brilliant idea with states competing instead of countries. Americans love music. Americans love competition. Americans love where they come from. They have an awesome amount of pride for their home state, for their hometown."[30]

Lenhoff then contacted fellow Swedish producer Peter Settman, who crafted the business plan for potential sponsors and TV networks. After announcing in 2019 that they have acquired the rights from the EBU to produce an American version of Eurovision,[31][32] Björkman and his team received a call from Silverman saying, "You are not doing this without me. Period. That's not going to happen."[30]

When America is more factionalized than ever and we are dealing with so many issues that divide us, the one (thing) that truly unites us is our culture. (The American Song Contest) can unite it by celebrating its diversity, its distinctions, and in pulling everyone around its love of music and its love of song.

Ben Silverman, executive producer, speaking to NME.com[33]

The European Broadcasting Union announced NBC had acquired the rights to broadcast the competition on May 14, 2021.[32] NBC announced the American Song Contest would have a mid-season or summer premiere in 2022 after releasing their fall schedule for the upcoming 2021–22 network television season.[5][34] The producers were able to get NBC on board mainly due to their experience working with music shows such as The Voice and Songland. Silverman serves as executive producer for the program, while Audrey Morrissey is appointed as the showrunner.[29][30] Propagate Content and Universal Television Alternative Studio serve as the production companies for the program.[32] In a press statement, Silverman hoped that focusing on the mutual love and respect for music would unite a "fractional America."[35] Deadline Hollywood reported that a corporation that centers around the competition has been founded, with former Propagate president Greg Lipstone appointed as President and Chief Operating Officer. The American Song Contest, Inc., aims to "develop and grow the Eurovision brand globally," which includes creating auxiliary businesses around the reality series, as well as expanding the franchise to countries that are not covered by Eurovision.[36]

An online submissions platform was launched in May 2021, allowing eligible artists aged 16 years and older to apply, with or without recording or publishing deals.[37] Participants were required to list all states or territories with which they had "an authentic, deep connection" during the casting process, with the producers having the final say on which state or territory the artists would represent. The website stressed that submissions had to be original songs in any genre and could not have been released commercially. Songs that were released promotionally, such as on SoundCloud and on social media, could be submitted—given that all posts were to be deleted if selected. The producers teased the possibility of filming in Los Angeles or Atlanta between February and April 2022.[38] However, filming was later confirmed to take place on the Universal Studios Lot in Universal City, California.[39] Previously, Björkman had stated during an interview in The Euro Trip podcast that Las Vegas, Tampa, and Orlando were also considered to be the first host city.[40]

NBC originally scheduled the premiere for February 21, 2022, but the premiere was postponed in favor of America's Got Talent: Extreme due to COVID-19-related concerns involving the Omicron variant. The first live show has since been rescheduled to March 21, while the finale will be on May 9, which is in the same week as the Eurovision Song Contest 2022.[3][41]

Rapper Snoop Dogg and pop singer Kelly Clarkson were introduced as presenters of the show. In a statement, Clarkson said: "I have been a fan and love the concept of Eurovision and am thrilled to bring the musical phenomenon to America. I'm so excited to work with Snoop and can't wait to see every state and territory represented by artists singing their own songs."[42] Clarkson added during a virtual press conference: "We are so unfortunately divided... and having so many things going on – it's been a very hard couple of years and now it's getting more serious. Feeling like you are not isolated and that you are a part of something bigger than your everyday world is so important. That's what this show is going to do for people. Everyone is being represented. It's a really great concept in general but one that is very needed right now."[43]

Participants

NBC revealed the 56 competing artists on March 3, 2022, through an interactive map.[44] Atlantic Records will serve as the exclusive music partner of the American Song Contest, with the original songs in the competition to be released in batches beginning March 21 at midnight Eastern Daylight Time.[45]

Participants[44]
State/Territory Artist Song Songwriter(s)
 Alabama Ni/Co "The Difference" Andreas Carlsson, Colton Jones, Danielle Brillhart, Gaby Feldman, Kevin Hutchens
 Alaska Jewel "The Story" Jewel Kilcher, Johan Carlsson, Ross Golan
 American Samoa Tenelle "Full Circle" Ali Dee Theodore, Anthony Mirabella III, Benjamin Briggs, Bianca Sperduti, Kerry Clisby, Nikki Sorentino, Sergio Cabral, Susan Paroff, Tenelle Luafalemana, Trent Foisia
 Arizona Las Marías "De La Finikera" Eduardo Meza
 Arkansas Kelsey Lamb "Never Like This" Carly Pearce, Casey Brown, Parker Welling
 California Sweet Taboo "Keys to the Kingdom" Breanne Santana, Gian Stone, Jennifer Torrejon, Madison Love, Richard Vission, Samantha Ramos, Sean Douglas
 Colorado Riker Lynch "Feel the Love" Andreas Carlsson, Desmond Child, Jimmy Jansson, Vera Hotsauce
 Connecticut Michael Bolton "Beautiful World" Justin Jesso, Michael Bolton
 Delaware Nitro Nitra "Train" Ali Dee Theodore, Anthony Mirabella III, Auanitra Aiken, Bianca Sperduti, James A. Pollard Jr.
 Florida Ale Zabala "Flirt" Alexa Zabala, Andreas Carlsson, Melanie Joy Fontana, Michel Schulz
 Georgia Stela Cole "DIY" Hollyn Shadinger, Mark Evans, Stephen Harry Dunkley, Steven Cheung
 Guam Jason J. "Midnight" Chaz Mark Toney, Jason Niel Jabinigay
 Hawaii Bronson Varde "4 You" Ali Dee Theodore, Anthony Mirabella III, Bianca Sperduti, Bronson Varde, Nikki Sorentino, Sergio Cabral, Susan Paroff
 Idaho Andrew Sheppard "Steady Machine" Andrew Sheppard
 Illinois Justin Jesso "Lifeline" Devin Kennedy, Justin Jesso, Lukas Kostas
 Indiana UG skywalkin (ft. Maxie) "Love in My City" Albert Sprears, Antonio Maxie, Josh Phillip Kimbowa, Theophilus Akai
 Iowa Alisabeth Von Presley "Wonder" Ali Dee Theodore, Alisabeth Von Presley, Anthony Mirabella III, Timothy James King
 Kansas Broderick Jones (ft. Calio) "Tell Me" Broderick Jones, Callan Searcy
 Kentucky Jordan Smith "Sparrow" Andreas Carlsson, Desmond Child, Jordan Smith
 Louisiana Brittany Pfantz "Now You Do" Brittany Pfantz, Ryan Corn
 Maine King Kyote "Get Out Alive" Darren Elder, Jonathan King, Jonathan Wyman, Joseph Mahoney
 Maryland Sisqó "It's Up" Mark Althavan Andrews, Nathan L. Mooring
 Massachusetts Jared Lee "Shameless" Carly Paige, Dan Whittemore, Diamond Karruen White Long, Jared Lee
 Michigan Ada LeAnn "Natalie" Ada LeAnn Compton, Carter Jon Frodge
 Minnesota Yam Haus "Ready to Go" Lawrence Lane Pruitt, Simon Oscroft, Zachary Kurt Beinlich
 Mississippi Keyone Starr "Fire" Ali Dee Theodore, Anthony Mirabella III, Bianca Sperduti, John Emanuel Morris, Lakreshia Keyone Edwards, Sergio Cabral
 Missouri Halie "Better Things" Alex Angelo, Blake Densmore, Halie Wooldridge
 Montana Jonah Prill "Fire It Up" Jared Mullins, Jordan Schmidt, Seth Ennis
 Nebraska Jocelyn "Never Alone" Danelle Joy Leverett Reeves, Jason Bradford Reeves, Jocelyn Anderson
 Nevada The Crystal Method (feat. Koda and VAAAL) "Watch Me Now" David Mårtensson, Jordan David Sudak, Scott Kirkland
 New Hampshire MARi "Fly" Ali Dee Theodore, Andreas Carlsson, Anthony Mirabella III, Bianca Sperduti, David Mullen, Ian Anthony Osborne, Mari Burelle-Valencia, Scott Callaway
 New Jersey Brooke Alexx "I Don't Take Pictures Anymore" Autumn Buysse, Brandon Meagher, Brooke Alexandria Greenberg
 New Mexico Khalisol "Drop" Geoffrey McCray, Kaelin Ellis, Zachary Chicoine
 New York Enisa "Green Light" Cameron Warren, Enisa Nikaj
 North Carolina John Morgan "Right in the Middle" John Morgan, Justin Wilson, Rodney Clawson, Will Bundy
 North Dakota Chloe Fredericks "Can't Make You Love Me" Chloe Fredericks, Melissa Carter, Rob Nagelhout
 Northern Mariana Islands Sabyu "Sunsets and Seaturtles" Chris Mena, Gerson Zaragoza, Matthew Sablan, Mike Kohfeld, Skúli Gestsson
 Ohio Macy Gray (ft. The California Jet Club and Maino) "Every Night" Alex Kyhn, Billy Wes, Christopher Dotson, Jamal Rashid, Jermaine Coleman, Natalie Hinds, Tamir Barzilay, Thomas Lumpkin
 Oklahoma AleXa "Wonderland" Albin Nordqvist, Andreas Carlsson, Bekuh Boom, Ellen Berg, Moa Carlebecker
 Oregon courtship. "Million Dollar Smoothies" Eli Rueben Hirsch, Micah Ross Gordon
 Pennsylvania Bri Steves "Plenty Love" Avery Earls, Brandon Hodge, Brianna Ashleigh Stevenson, Darryl Pearson, Donnie Meadows, Kristal Oliver, Larrance Dopson, Quintin Gulledge
 Puerto Rico Christian Pagán "Loko" Bileidy Hernandez, Christian Pagán, Desmond Child, Emilio Amaya Acosta, Faisal Ben Said, Jodi Marr, Markus Sepehrmanesh, Samuel Kvist, Timothy Caifeldt
 Rhode Island Hueston "Held On Too Long" Cory Hueston
 South Carolina Jesse LeProtti "Not Alone" Ali Dee Theodore, Andreas Carlsson, Anthony Mirabella III, Bianca Sperduti, Jesse Leprotti
 South Dakota Judd Hoos "Bad Girl" Adam Dennis Agin, Andrew Arthur Young, Denham Issac McDermott
 Tennessee Tyler Braden "Seventeen" Tyler Braden
 Texas Grant Knoche "Mr. Independent" Grant Christian Knoche, John Arnell Newsome
 U.S. Virgin Islands Cruz Rock "Celebrando" Ali Dee Theodore, Anthony Mirabella III, Bianca Sperduti, Errol Ajani Williams, Frankie Garcia, Sergio Cabral
 Utah Savannah Keyes "Sad Girl" Blair Daly, Heather Morgan, Savannah Keyes
 Vermont Josh Panda "Rollercoaster" Clinton Lewis Bierman, Joshua Pender, Peter Whitfield Day
 Virginia Almira Zaky "Over You" Almira Zaky
 Washington Allen Stone "A Bit of Both" Allen Stone, Tyler Acord
 Washington, D.C. Nëither "I Like It" Marcus R. Neither
 West Virginia Alexis Cunningham "Working on a Miracle" Alexis Paige Cunningham, Eric Bazilian
 Wisconsin Jake'O "Feel Your Love" Ali Dee Theodore, Anthony Mirabella III, Bianca Sperduti, Jacob Brendan McCluskey
 Wyoming Ryan Charles "New Boot Goofin'" Khadi Clamoungou, Ryan Charles Kinzer

Qualifying rounds

In each qualifying round, 11-12 songs competed for four spots in the semi-final with the outcome decided upon by the votes from a jury panel and a public televote. An automatic qualifier in each round was determined by the juries, while the remaining three spots will be decided by a combination of the jury and public votes.[46][47] Moreover, two artists with the highest streams will return as redemption picks and will compete in the semi-finals.

Qualifiers 1

The first qualifier round was held on Monday, March 21.[48][49] At the end of the broadcast, it was announced that the jury had selected Rhode Island to advance to the semi-final.[50] On April 18, it was announced on The Kelly Clarkson Show that Wyoming had advanced to the semi-final, being the first redemption pick.[51]

  Jury qualifier   Combined qualifier   Redemption

Draw State/Territory Artist Song Jury
1  Minnesota Yam Haus "Ready to Go" 7
2  Oklahoma AleXa "Wonderland" 2
3  Arkansas Kelsey Lamb "Never Like This" 3
4  Indiana UG skywalkin "Love in My City" 11
5  Puerto Rico Christian Pagán "Loko" 4
6  Connecticut Michael Bolton "Beautiful World" 5
7  Iowa Alisabeth Von Presley "Wonder" 8
8  Wisconsin Jake'O "Feel Your Love" 9
9  Mississippi Keyone Starr "Fire" 6
10  Wyoming Ryan Charles "New Boot Goofin'" 10
11  Rhode Island Hueston "Held On Too Long" 1

Qualifiers 2

The second qualifier round was held on Monday, March 28. At the end of the broadcast, it was announced that the jury had selected Kentucky to advance to the semi-final.[52] During the first semi-final, it was announced that New York had advanced to the semi-final, being the second redemption pick.[53]

  Jury qualifier   Combined qualifier   Redemption

Draw State/Territory Artist Song Jury
1  Oregon courtship. "Million Dollar Smoothies" 11
2  Montana Jonah Prill "Fire It Up" 3
3  New York Enisa "Green Light" 9
4  Nebraska Jocelyn "Never Alone" 7
5  U.S. Virgin Islands Cruz Rock "Celebrando" 10
6  Kentucky Jordan Smith "Sparrow" 1
7  North Dakota Chloe Fredericks "Can't Make You Love Me" 5
8  Kansas Broderick Jones "Tell Me" 2
9  Virginia Almira Zaky "Over You" 8
10  Maine King Kyote "Get Out Alive" 4
11  Ohio Macy Gray "Every Night" 6

Qualifiers 3

The third qualifier round was held on Monday, April 4. At the end of the broadcast, it was announced that the jury had selected Tennessee to advance to the semi-final.[54]

  Jury qualifier   Combined qualifier

Draw State/Territory Artist Song Jury Place
1  Texas Grant Knoche "Mr. Independent" 4 4
2  Louisiana Brittany Pfantz "Now You Do" 8 9
3  Tennessee Tyler Braden "Seventeen" 1 1
4  New Jersey Brooke Alexx "I Don't Take Pictures Anymore" 5 7
5  Alabama Ni/Co "The Difference" 3 3
6  Florida Ale Zabala "Flirt" 2 6
7  Alaska Jewel "The Story" 9 5
8  South Carolina Jesse LeProtti "Not Alone" 12 12
9  South Dakota Judd Hoos "Bad Girl" 11 11
10  Delaware Nitro Nitra "Train" 7 8
11  Northern Mariana Islands Sabyu "Sunsets and Seaturtles" 10 10
12  Colorado Riker Lynch "Feel the Love" 6 2

Qualifiers 4

The fourth qualifier round was held on Monday, April 11. At the end of the broadcast, it was announced that the jury had selected Washington to advance to the semi-final.[55]

  Jury qualifier   Combined qualifier

Draw State/Territory Artist Song Jury
1  New Hampshire Mari "Fly" 8
2  Nevada The Crystal Method "Watch Me Now" 3
3  Utah Savannah Keyes "Sad Girl" 7
4  Washington, D.C. Nëither "I Like It" 11
5  Massachusetts Jared Lee "Shameless" 2
6  Georgia Stela Cole "DIY" 6
7  Hawaii Bronson Varde "4 You" 9
8  West Virginia Alexis Cunningham "Working on a Miracle" 5
9  Arizona Las Marías "De La Finikera" 10
10  Pennsylvania Bri Steves "Plenty Love" 4
11  Washington Allen Stone "A Bit of Both" 1

Qualifiers 5

The fifth qualifier round was held on Monday, April 18. At the end of the broadcast, it was announced that the jury had selected Michigan to advance to the semi-final.[56]

  Jury qualifier   Combined qualifier

Draw State/Territory Artist Song Jury
1  Illinois Justin Jesso "Lifeline" 5
2  California Sweet Taboo "Keys to the Kingdom" 2
3  Idaho Andrew Sheppard "Steady Machine" 6
4  New Mexico Khalisol "Drop" 7
5  Missouri Halie "Better Things" 10
6  American Samoa Tenelle "Full Circle" 4
7  North Carolina John Morgan "Right in the Middle" 3
8  Vermont Josh Panda "Rollercoaster" 8
9  Guam Jason J. "Midnight" 11
10  Michigan Ada LeAnn "Natalie" 1
11  Maryland Sisqó "It's Up" 9

Semi-finals

The twenty-two semi-finalists were split to compete in two heats on April 25 and May 2, respectively. Eleven semi-finalists will compete for five spots in the grand final with the outcome decided upon by the votes from a jury panel and a public televote. An automatic qualifier in each semi-final will be determined by the juries, while the remaining four spots will be decided by the public votes.[47] Ten performers will advance in the grand final on May 9.

On April 19, NBC has confirmed the first 11 semi-finalists who will compete on the first semi-final.[57]

Semi-final 1

The first semi-final was held on Monday, April 25. At the end of the broadcast, it was announced that the jury had selected Washington to advance to the final. The public qualifiers were announced at the beginning of the second semi-final, where Oklahoma, Colorado, Alabama, and Kentucky were announced as finalists.[53][58]

  Jury qualifier   Public vote qualifier

Draw State/Territory Artist Song Jury
1  Kentucky Jordan Smith "Sparrow" 2
2  Colorado Riker Lynch "Feel the Love" 11
3  New Hampshire Mari "Fly" 9
4  Washington Allen Stone "A Bit of Both" 1
5  Alabama Ni/Co "The Difference" 6
6  Wyoming Ryan Charles "New Boot Goofin'" 10
7  Rhode Island Hueston "Held On Too Long" 3
8  Montana Jonah Prill "Fire It Up" 7
9  Michigan Ada LeAnn "Natalie" 4
10  Massachusetts Jared Lee "Shameless" 8
11  Oklahoma AleXa "Wonderland" 5

Semi-final 2

The second semi-final was held on Monday, May 2. At the end of the broadcast, it was announced that the jury had selected Tennessee to advance to the final. On Wednesday, May 4 it was announced on the E! Network that the public qualifiers were Connecticut, American Samoa, Texas, and North Dakota.[59][60]

  Jury qualifier   Public vote qualifier

Draw State/Territory Artist Song Jury
1  Puerto Rico Christian Pagán "Loko" 7
2  North Carolina John Morgan "Right in the Middle" 4
3  Kansas Broderick Jones "Tell Me" 2
4  New York Enisa "Green Light" 11
5  North Dakota Chloe Fredericks "Can't Make You Love Me" 6
6  Connecticut Michael Bolton "Beautiful World" 5
7  Texas Grant Knoche "Mr. Independent" 8
8  California Sweet Taboo "Keys to the Kingdom" 3
9  Tennessee Tyler Braden "Seventeen" 1
10  Georgia Stela Cole "DIY" 9
11  American Samoa Tenelle "Full Circle" 10

Grand final

The grand final took place on May 9. Ten states and territories participated in the grand final, composing of the two jury qualifiers and eight public vote qualifiers from the two semi-finals.[61][62] As an interval act, Jimmie Allen performed his single "Down Home".

Draw State/Territory Artist Song Jury Public vote Total Place
1  Connecticut Michael Bolton "Beautiful World" 40 298 338 7
2  North Dakota Chloe Fredericks "Can't Make You Love Me" 48 219 267 9
3  Texas Grant Knoche "Mr. Independent" 42 324 366 4
4  Alabama Ni/Co "The Difference" 60 225 285 8
5  Kentucky Jordan Smith "Sparrow" 79 328 407 3
6  Washington[a] Allen Stone "A Bit of Both" 105 254 359 5
7  American Samoa Tenelle "Full Circle" 37 305 342 6
8  Oklahoma AleXa "Wonderland" 56 654 710 1
9  Tennessee Tyler Braden "Seventeen" 88 163 251 10
10  Colorado Riker Lynch "Feel the Love" 25 478 503 2

Scoreboard

Voting results[64]
  Public vote
  Jury vote
Jury score
Public score
Lower South
Mid Atlantic
Midwest
Mountains
New England
Pacific West
Plains
Southwest
Territories
Upper South
Contestants
Connecticut 40 298 6 7 1 6 1 2 1 2 7 7
North Dakota 48 219 4 2 7 8 5 6 3 5 4 4
Texas 42 324 3 4 10 5 3 1 5 6 3 2
Alabama 60 225 7 3 6 4 6 10 12 4 5 3
Kentucky 79 328 12 10 4 7 10 8 8 8 2 10
Washington 105 254 10 12 12 12 12 12 7 12 10 6
American Samoa 37 305 5 6 3 2 2 5 2 3 8 1
Oklahoma 56 654 1 5 5 3 8 3 10 7 6 8
Tennessee 88 163 8 8 8 10 7 7 6 10 12 12
Colorado 25 478 2 1 2 1 4 4 4 1 1 5
12 points

Below is a summary of the maximum 12 points awarded by each region's professional juries.

12 points awarded by juries
N. Contestant Region(s) giving 12 points
6  Washington Mid Atlantic, Midwest, Mountains, New England, Pacific West, Southwest
2  Tennessee Territories, Upper South
1  Alabama Plains
 Kentucky Lower South

National jury and spokespersons

National jury

The winner of the American Song Contest was partly determined by a 56-member "national jury," with one member representing each state and territory. Their duty was to evaluate each entry based on the live performance, together with its "artistic expression, hit potential, originality, and visual impression." They were then divided into ten regions, namely: Midwest, Upper South, New England, Plains, Mountains, Lower South, Mid-Atlantic, Southwest, Territories, and Pacific. Jurors include:[65]

  • Alabama – Amber Parker, program director, WTXT Tuscaloosa, iHeartMedia
  • Alaska – Quinn Christopherson, singer-songwriter
  • American Samoa – Joseph Fa'avae, founder, Island Block Network
  • Arizona – Double-L, music director, on-air personality, KNIX Phoenix, iHeartMedia
  • Arkansas – Kevin Mercer, program director, KHKN Little Rock, iHeartMedia
  • California – Dan McCarroll, former president of Capitol Records and WB Records
  • Colorado – Isaac Slade, frontman of the Fray
  • Connecticut – Jaime Levine, CEO, Seven Mantels, artist manager
  • Delaware – Christa Cooper, on-air personality / assistant program director, WDSD Wilmington, iHeartMedia
  • Florida – Jose Tillan, director/producer – The POPGarage
  • Georgia – Jennifer Goicoechea, SVP A&R Sony Music, EPIC
  • Guam – Heidi Chargualaf Quenga, executive director, Chamorro Cultural Advisor
  • Hawaii – Eric Daniels, keyboardist/arranger, The Voice
  • Idaho – Shari Short, singer/songwriter/producer
  • Illinois – Mike Knobloch, president, music and publishing, NBCUniversal
  • Indiana – Nancy Yearing, talent development
  • Iowa – Taylor J., program director / on-air personality KKDM Des Moines, iHeartMedia
  • Kansas – Michelle Buckles, program director, KZCH Wichita, iHeartMedia
  • Kentucky – Ashley Wilson, director of country programming, Kentucky/Indiana, iHeartMedia
  • Louisiana – Uptown Angela, Executive Vice President of Programming, format lead custom R&B/gospel, iHeartMedia
  • Maine – Lauren Wayne, general manager, talent buyer, State Theater
  • Maryland – Caron Veazey, Founder & CEO, Something in Common
  • Massachusetts – Jamie Cerreta, EVP Hipgnosis Songs Group
  • Michigan – Shahida Mausi, CEO The Right Productions, Inc./Aretha Franklin Amphitheatre
  • Minnesota – Barry Lather, creative director, choreographer, producer
  • Mississippi – Joe King the Big Daddy, program director, WZLD Hattiesburg, iHeartMedia
  • Missouri – Tommy Austin, SVP Programming, iHeartMedia
  • Montana – Stephanie Davis, singer-songwriter
  • Nebraska – Hoss Michaels, program director, KXKT Omaha, iHeartMedia
  • Nevada – Jim Vellutato, CEO, Arrival Music
  • New Hampshire – Charlie Singer, music television producer, executive producer
  • New Jersey – Matt Pinfield, nationally syndicated radio host, A&R consultant, former MTV host of 120 Minutes
  • New Mexico – Tony Manero, SVP Programming Southwest, iHeartMedia
  • New York – Tom Poleman, Chief Programming Officer & President, iHeartMedia
  • North Carolina – Paul Schadt, on-air personality, WKKT Charlotte, iHeartMedia
  • North Dakota – Allison Bostow, program director / on-air personality, KIZZ Minot, iHeartMedia
  • Northern Mariana Islands – Galvin Deleon Guerrero, President of Northern Marianas College, radio DJ
  • Ohio – Khirye Tyler, songwriter, producer, musical director
  • Oklahoma – Ester Dean, singer-songwriter
  • Oregon – Mark Hamilton, program director / on-air personality, Portland Audacy
  • Pennsylvania – Ty Stiklorius, Founder & CEO of Friends at Work
  • Puerto Rico – Carlos Perez, creative director
  • Rhode Island – Kristin Lessard, on-air personality, WSNE Providence, iHeartMedia
  • South Carolina – Miss Monique, on-air personality / program director, WXBT Columbia, iHeartMedia
  • South Dakota – Jered Johnson, President / CEO, Pepper Entertainment
  • Tennessee – Brian Phillips, Executive VP, Content and Audience, Cumulus Media
  • Texas – Natural, music producer
  • U.S. Virgin Islands – Ajanie Williams, music producer & author
  • Utah – Jeff McCartney, SVP Programming, Salt Lake City, iHeartMedia
  • Vermont – Lee Chesnut, A&R Consultant
  • Virginia – Justin Derrico, musician
  • Washington – Zann Fredlund, on-air personality, music director & assistant program director, KBKS Seattle, iHeartMedia
  • Washington, D.C. – Dustin Matthews, Director of Rock Programming, Washington, DC, iHeartMedia
  • West Virginia – Judy Eaton, program director, WTCR Huntington, iHeartMedia
  • Wisconsin – Shanna "Quinn" Cudeck, program director / on-air personality, WMIL Milwaukee, iHeartMedia
  • Wyoming – Ian Munsick, Warner Music recording artist

Spokespersons

All 56 juries were geographically divided in the grand final and selected the following spokespersons who announced the 12-point score from their respective regional juries:

12 points awarded by juries
Region Juries Spokesperson
Lower South Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee Ale Zabala (FL)
Mid Atlantic Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Washington D.C. Nitro Nitra (DE)
Midwest Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin Yam Haus (MN)
Mountains Colorado, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming Ryan Charles (WY)
New England Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont Jared Lee (MA)
Pacific West Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington Bronson Varde (HI)
Plains Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma Alisabeth Von Presley (IA)
Southwest Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Texas Savannah Keyes (UT)
Territories American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, US. Virgin Islands Jason J. (GU)
Upper South Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, Virginia Almira Zaky (VA)

Episodes

No.Title [66][67]Original air date [66][67]Prod.
code [66]
U.S. viewers
(millions)
Rating
(18–49)
1"The Live Qualifiers Premiere"March 21, 2022 (2022-03-21)1012.90[68]0.49[68]
2"The Live Qualifiers Part 2"March 28, 2022 (2022-03-28)1021.88[69]0.34[69]
3"The Live Qualifiers Part 3"April 4, 2022 (2022-04-04)1031.65[70]0.28[70]
4"The Live Qualifiers Part 4"April 11, 2022 (2022-04-11)1041.44[71]0.28[71]
5"The Live Qualifiers Part 5"April 18, 2022 (2022-04-18)1051.53[72]0.27[72]
6"The Live Semi-Finals Premiere"April 25, 2022 (2022-04-25)1061.44[73]0.27[73]
7"The Live Semi-Finals Part 2"May 2, 2022 (2022-05-02)1071.61[74]0.28[74]
8"The Live Grand Final"May 9, 2022 (2022-05-09)1082.04[75]0.33[75]

Marketing

Snoop Dogg (left) and Kelly Clarkson were introduced as presenters of the American Song Contest during the show's advertisement at the start of the Super Bowl LVI halftime show.[2]

NBC News produced a report promoting the casting process of the American Song Contest, which was then distributed to its affiliate stations across the U.S. and its territories. It featured an interview with supervising casting producer Michelle McNulty, stating that they were "looking for the next big hit single, like those anthem songs... that just get in your head and can't get them out."[76][77] The Italian rock band Måneskin, winners of the Eurovision Song Contest 2021, performed during the Top 10 episode of The Voice season 21, in which host Carson Daly promoted the American Song Contest as "the U.S. version of Eurovision."[78]

On December 15, 2021, NBC released a promotional video for the American Song Contest on their Twitter account, stating that it'll be "the biggest live music event America has ever seen", with songs from all genres competing.[79]

An advertisement that introduces Snoop Dogg and Clarkson as the show's presenters debuted before the Super Bowl LVI halftime show.[80] Clarkson had previously performed a cover of "Arcade" by Dutch singer Duncan Laurence, the winning song of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019, at her talk show.[81]

Radio stations affiliated with iHeartRadio have introduced sweepstakes in relation to the American Song Contest to listeners for a chance to win gift cards.[82][83]

International broadcasting

The show is also broadcast in multiple European countries, as well as in Canada:

Reception

The concept of producing a US version of Eurovision was initially met with lukewarm reactions. Andy Kryza of Time Out wrote that the American Song Contest's biggest challenge is "the relative homogeneity of the American musical landscape," that its pop stars need to be paired with colorful performers like drag queens, wrecking crews, clowns, gospel singers, and the like.[98] Justin Kirkland of Esquire predicted that the contest will be "a colossal nightmare," adding that Americans "lack the self-deprecation, campiness, and selfless energy to pull this off."[99] Chris Murphy of Vulture.com pointed out that the television landscape in the United States is saturated with singing and talent competitions, adding that "no one's gonna write a song as catchy as 'Husavik'."[100]

In an interview with BBC Breakfast in 2020, Cheryl Baker (member of the winning act in the 1981 Eurovision) opined that the competition will not translate well in the U.S., adding that the country "has got a long way to go to get the kitsch, the cheese, and the fun element" of the contest. Baker also suggested that the U.S. should bring a representative to Eurovision instead.

When asked about the possibility of competing in the American Song Contest, Flo Rida explained that it would be "a dream come true." The Florida-based rapper performed "Adrenalina" along with San Marino's representative Senhit at the Eurovision Song Contest 2021.[101]

Writing for The Guardian, Adam Gabbatt was excited about "the mouth-watering prospect of seeing how politically and culturally opposed states rate the musical output of their rivals." Gabbatt explained how conservative viewers in Texas and liberal audiences in New York could express their mutual dislike for one another, or how voters might turn against Florida due to the anti-mask and vaccine-skeptic crusade of the state's current governor.[33] Fellow The Guardian columnist Stuart Heritage described the list of participants as "breathtakingly starry," referring to artists who "already have their own Wikipedia page," which he took as a sign that the producers are "taking this thing seriously."[102]

Reacting to the premiere episode, Kevin Fallon of The Daily Beast commented that it was a "big ole meh," while pointing out the performances of Oklahoma's AleXa and Puerto Rico's Christian Pagán as the highlights of the night. Fallon added that while Wyoming's entry "New Boot Goofin'" was "undeniably the worst song of the night," he predicted that its irresistibility would become the show's "greatest success story."[103] Emily Yahr of The Washington Post also wrote praises about "New Boot Goofin'", adding that it "immediately stole the show's social media thunder" and it could be "the song of the summer."[104] Yahoo! Music's editor-in-chief Lyndsey Parker wrote that the first episode of the American Song Contest "failed to live up to Eurovision's wacky promise or premise," while predicting Rhode Island's entry "Held on Too Long" could win the competition.[105]

Notes

  1. ^ During the show, it was announced that Allen Stone was not able to perform live due to personal reasons. Thus, he competed using a pre-recorded footage.[63]

References

  1. ^ "'American Song Contest' to launch on Monday 21 February, 2022 🇺🇸". Eurovision.tv. November 12, 2021. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d "Snoop Dogg & Kelly Clarkson To Host NBC's 'American Song Contest' Reality Series". Deadline. February 13, 2022. Archived from the original on February 14, 2022. Retrieved February 13, 2022.
  3. ^ a b Mitovich, Matt Webb (January 19, 2022). "NBC's AGT: Extreme Now Set for February Premiere, Four-Week Run". TVLine. Archived from the original on January 19, 2022. Retrieved January 19, 2022.
  4. ^ Tangcay, Jazz (August 6, 2020). "Eurovision Sets Sail for U.S. Shores as 'American Song Contest' (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety.com. Variety. Archived from the original on February 27, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  5. ^ a b White, Peter (May 14, 2021). "'American Song Contest', U.S. Version Of Eurovision, Tunes Up For NBC". Deadline. Archived from the original on May 14, 2021. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  6. ^ "'American Song Contest' on screens in 2022". Eurovision.tv (Press release). May 14, 2021. Archived from the original on May 14, 2021. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  7. ^ "Kelly Clarkson, Snoop Dogg to host 'American Song Contest'". WAVY.com. March 1, 2022. Archived from the original on March 9, 2022. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  8. ^ Maas, Jennifer (March 21, 2022). "How 'American Song Contest' Voting Will Work Via TikTok, and Who's on the 56-Member Jury Panel (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved March 22, 2022.
  9. ^ "Så sänds American Song Contest på SVT". Melodifestivalen.se (in Swedish). March 9, 2022. Archived from the original on March 16, 2022. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  10. ^ Surette, Tim (March 14, 2022). "American Song Contest: Release Date, Competitors, and Everything to Know About NBC's New Reality Competition". TVGuide.com. Archived from the original on March 15, 2022. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  11. ^ Knolle, Sharon (March 14, 2022). "Kelly Clarkson Believes 'American Song Contest' Can Unite the Country: 'This Show Is for Everyone'". The Wrap. Archived from the original on March 15, 2022. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  12. ^ "American Song Contest: NBC secures rights to Eurovision spin-off in the United States". Wiwibloggs. May 14, 2021. Archived from the original on May 14, 2021. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  13. ^ "Culture and Entertainment: Eurovision". BrandEU.eu. Building Brand Europe. Archived from the original on May 22, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  14. ^ "A África também vai ver o Grande Prémio da Eurovisão". Diário de Lisboa (in Portuguese). Mário Soares Foundation. April 3, 1971. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  15. ^ Roxburgh, Gordon (2012). Songs for Europe: The United Kingdom at the Eurovision Song Contest. Volume One: The 1950s and 1960s. Prestatyn: Telos Publishing. pp. 482–493. ISBN 978-1-84583-065-6.
  16. ^ Barak, Itamar (May 22, 2003). "EBU press conference about the contest's future". ESCToday.com. Archived from the original on May 22, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  17. ^ "EBU.CH :: 2004_05_11_ESC". April 8, 2005. Archived from the original on April 8, 2005. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  18. ^ Parker, Lyndsey (May 9, 2016). "See Kim Chi, Bob the Drag Queen, and Naomi Smalls Serve 'Realness' in Exclusive 'RuPaul's Drag Race' Music Video Preview". Yahoo!. Archived from the original on May 17, 2016. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  19. ^ Jordan, Paul (April 27, 2017). "Eurovision returns to the United States". eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  20. ^ "Logo to air Eurovision 2018 Grand Final live in the United States – Eurovision Song Contest Lisbon 2018". European Broadcasting Union. April 23, 2018. Archived from the original on March 30, 2019. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  21. ^ Granger, Anthony (May 16, 2018). "United States: Eurovision Viewing Figures Grow on Logo TV". Eurovoix.com. Archived from the original on March 21, 2022. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  22. ^ McCaig, Ewan (May 6, 2018). "United States: Eurovision 2018 To Be Broadcast On Radio". Eurovoix. Archived from the original on April 13, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  23. ^ Granger, Anthony (May 17, 2019). "United States: WJFD 97.3 to Broadcast Eurovision 2019 Final". Eurovoix. Archived from the original on May 17, 2019. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  24. ^ "Eurovision 2019 and 2020 are coming to Netflix in the U.S." Eurovision.tv. July 19, 2019. Archived from the original on May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  25. ^ Stojanović, Nikola. "Netflix Eurovision Movie To Be Released On 26th Of June!". ESCBubble.com. Archived from the original on March 21, 2022. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  26. ^ Mendelson, Scott. "Netflix's 'Eurovision' Is Will Ferrell's Most Successful Movie In Years". Forbes. Archived from the original on March 21, 2022. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
  27. ^ Bryan, Scott (May 21, 2021). "A Beginner's Guide to Eurovision 2021". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 22, 2021. Retrieved May 22, 2021.
  28. ^ "US to emulate Eurovision contest". BBC News. February 11, 2006. Archived from the original on May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  29. ^ a b Tangcay, Jazz (August 6, 2020). "Eurovision Sets Sail for U.S. Shores as 'American Song Contest' (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Archived from the original on February 27, 2021. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  30. ^ a b c Bronson, Fred (March 19, 2022). "How Swedish Producers Helped Transform Eurovision Into 'American Song Contest'". Billboard.com. Archived from the original on March 21, 2022. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  31. ^ Lee, Kevin (May 15, 2019). "American Song Contest: Christer Björkman reveals plans to launch as soon as 2021". Wiwibloggs.com. Archived from the original on March 21, 2022. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  32. ^ a b c "American Song Contest Lands on NBC". European Broadcasting Union (Press release). May 14, 2021. Archived from the original on May 14, 2021. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  33. ^ a b Gabbatt, Adam. "Pop and geopolitics: American Song Contest aims to tap Eurovision formula". The Guardian. Archived from the original on February 14, 2022. Retrieved February 14, 2022.
  34. ^ Ausiello, Michael (May 14, 2021). "NBC Fall Schedule: This Is Us' Last Hurrah Pushed to 2022, All-L&O Thursdays, B99 Farewell Gets Olympics Launch, Zoey's and Good Girls MIA". TVLine. Archived from the original on May 14, 2021. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  35. ^ Kreps, Daniel (August 6, 2020). "'Eurovision' Producers Set 'American Song Contest' TV Event for 2021". Rolling Stone. Penske Business Media, LLC. Archived from the original on May 21, 2021. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
  36. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (March 16, 2022). "Greg Lipstone Joins American Song Contest Inc. As President & Chief Operating Officer As Company Eyes Expansion". Deadline.com. Archived from the original on March 18, 2022. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  37. ^ Granger, Anthony (May 28, 2021). "Song Submissions Open for the American Song Contest". Eurovoix-world.com. Eurovoix. Archived from the original on May 28, 2021. Retrieved May 29, 2021.
  38. ^ Adams, William Lee (May 29, 2021). "American Song Contest opens casting web site and teases production in Los Angeles and Atlanta". Wiwibloggs.com. Archived from the original on May 29, 2021. Retrieved May 29, 2021.
  39. ^ "American Song Contest FAQ". 1iota.com. 1iota. Archived from the original on February 16, 2022. Retrieved February 15, 2022.
  40. ^ "Final Details Decided for American Song Contest, Las Vegas Possible Host City". Eurovoix-world.com. Eurovoix. March 22, 2021. Archived from the original on March 25, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  41. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (January 19, 2022). "NBC Delays 'American Song Contest', Slots 'America's Got Talent: Extreme'". Deadline. Archived from the original on January 19, 2022. Retrieved January 19, 2022.
  42. ^ "Kelly Clarkson and Snoop Dogg to host American Song Contest 🇺🇸". Eurovision.tv. February 14, 2022. Archived from the original on February 15, 2022. Retrieved February 15, 2022.
  43. ^ Bronson, Fred (March 15, 2022). "Why Kelly Clarkson Thinks 'American Song Contest' Is the Right Show for a 'Divided' Country". Billboard.com. Archived from the original on March 17, 2022. Retrieved March 17, 2022.
  44. ^ a b "American Song Contest Interactive Map". NBC.com. Archived from the original on March 21, 2022. Retrieved March 3, 2022.
  45. ^ "American Song Contest: Michael Bolton, Macy Gray & Jewel among acts 🇺🇸". Eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. March 3, 2022. Archived from the original on March 3, 2022. Retrieved March 3, 2022.
  46. ^ Johnson, Lottie Elizabeth (March 21, 2022). "Eurovision is coming to America. Which state will produce the best song?". Deseret News. Retrieved March 22, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  47. ^ a b Rosa, Christopher (April 11, 2022). "Here Are the Artists Going to the American Song Contest Semi-Finals". NBC. Retrieved April 17, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  48. ^ Holmes, Martin. "'American Song Contest' Announces Its 56 Competitors Including Macy Gray, Jewel & Michael Bolton". TV Insider. Archived from the original on March 15, 2022. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  49. ^ Terry, Connor (March 16, 2022). "What do we know about the American Song Contest prior to next week's episode?". ESCUnited.com. Archived from the original on March 16, 2022. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  50. ^ Terry, Connor (March 21, 2022). "The American Song Contest Episode One Recap: Here's What You Missed!". ESCUnited. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  51. ^ Rosa, Christopher (March 18, 2022). "Wyoming's Ryan Charles—a.k.a 'New Boot Goofin'—Is ASC's First Redemption Artist". NBC. Retrieved April 20, 2022.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  52. ^ Griffith, Tyler (March 28, 2022). "The American Song Contest Qualifiers, Heat 2: Find Out What Happened Tonight!". ESCUnited. Archived from the original on March 29, 2022. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  53. ^ a b Stewart, Matthew; Sheehan, Paul (April 25, 2022). "'American Song Contest' episode 6 recap: Semi-final #1". Gold Derby. Retrieved April 25, 2022.
  54. ^ Terry, Connor (April 4, 2022). "American Song Contest Episode Three: Results and Recap". ESCUnited. Retrieved April 5, 2022.
  55. ^ Terry, Connor (April 11, 2022). "The American Song Contest Episode Four Recap: Who had the biggest impact tonight?". ESCUnited. Retrieved April 18, 2022.
  56. ^ Terry, Connor (April 18, 2022). "The American Song Contest Episode Four Recap: What did you miss on the last qualifier episode?". ESCUnited. Retrieved April 18, 2022.
  57. ^ Dixon, Marcus James (April 19, 2022). "'American Song Contest' week 6 preview: Ada Leann, Jordan Smith among first set of 11 semi-finalists". Gold Derby. Retrieved April 20, 2022.
  58. ^ Griffith, Tyler (May 3, 2022). "American Song Contest: First Finalists Revealed and Semi-Final 2 Performances". ESCUnited. Retrieved May 3, 2022.
  59. ^ Stewart, Matthew; Sheehan, Paul (May 2, 2022). "'American Song Contest' episode 7 recap: Semi-final #2". Gold Derby. Retrieved May 2, 2022.
  60. ^ Terry, Connor (May 4, 2022). "The final four qualifiers for the American Song Contest final have been announced!". ESCUnited. Retrieved May 4, 2022.
  61. ^ Jean-Philippe, McKenzie. "How You Can Vote for Your Favorite Artist on American Song Contest". NBC.com. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  62. ^ Terry, Connor (May 9, 2022). "The American Song Contest: Oklahoma's AleXa wins the very first edition of the contest". ESCUnited. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  63. ^ Stewart, Matthew; Sheehan, Paul (May 10, 2022). "'American Song Contest' episode 8 recap: Who won the final?". Gold Derby. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  64. ^ Terry, Connor. "The American Song Contest: Oklahoma's AleXa wins the very first edition of the contest". ESC United. Retrieved May 10, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  65. ^ Maas, Jennifer (March 21, 2022). "How 'American Song Contest' Voting Will Work Via TikTok, and Who's on the 56-Member Jury Panel (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved March 25, 2022.
  66. ^ a b c "American Song Contest Episode Listings". The Futon Critic.
  67. ^ a b "American Song Contest Episode Guide". Zap2it.
  68. ^ a b Mitch Salem (March 22, 2022). "Monday 3.21.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved March 22, 2022.
  69. ^ a b Mitch Metcalf (March 29, 2022). "Monday 3.28.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  70. ^ a b Mitch Metcalf (April 5, 2022). "Monday 4.4.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved April 5, 2022.
  71. ^ a b Mitch Salem (April 12, 2022). "Monday 4.11.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved April 12, 2022.
  72. ^ a b Mitch Metcalf (April 19, 2022). "Monday 4.18.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved April 19, 2022.
  73. ^ a b Mitch Salem (April 26, 2022). "Monday 4.25.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  74. ^ a b Mitch Metcalf (May 3, 2022). "Monday 5.2.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved May 3, 2022.
  75. ^ a b Mitch Salem (May 10, 2022). "Monday 5.9.2022 Top 150 Cable Originals & Network Finals". Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved May 11, 2022.
  76. ^ "American Song Contest". YouTube.com. NBC News. Archived from the original on November 30, 2021. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  77. ^ "American Song Contest". Facebook.com. WVVA News. Archived from the original on February 15, 2022. Retrieved February 15, 2022.
  78. ^ Maddalozzo, Riccardo (November 30, 2021). "Måneskin steal the show at The Voice USA". ESCXTRA.com. Archived from the original on March 12, 2022. Retrieved March 12, 2022.
  79. ^ NBC Entertainment [@nbc] (December 15, 2021). "The biggest live music event America has ever seen. NBC's #AmericanSongContest premieres after the Olympics" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  80. ^ Kress, Bryan (February 14, 2022). "Kelly Clarkson and Snoop Dogg introduce Eurovision-inspired American Song Contest: Watch". Consequence. Archived from the original on March 12, 2022. Retrieved March 12, 2022.
  81. ^ van Lith, Nick (February 7, 2022). "Kelly Clarkson covers "Arcade" by Duncan Laurence". ESCXTRA.com. Archived from the original on February 7, 2022. Retrieved March 12, 2022.
  82. ^ "Jodi and Bender bring you the American Song Contest". iHeart.com. Archived from the original on March 15, 2022. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  83. ^ "NBC's American Song Contest - Win a $500 American Express Gift Card". iHeart.com. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  84. ^ "Servus TV zeigt neuen "American Song Contest"" (in German). March 14, 2022. Archived from the original on March 14, 2022. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  85. ^ "Servus TV zeigt den "American Song Contest" zeitversetzt" (in Austrian German). March 14, 2022. Archived from the original on March 14, 2022. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  86. ^ "It's the biggest live music event of the year. American Song Contest 🎤🎶 is coming to CHCH this month". Twitter. March 7, 2022. Archived from the original on March 7, 2022. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  87. ^ Granger, Anthony (April 9, 2022). "🇪🇪 Estonia: TV3 Airing the American Song Contest". Eurovoix World. Retrieved April 15, 2022.
  88. ^ AMERICAN SONG CONTEST 2022 (in Finnish), archived from the original on February 15, 2022, retrieved February 15, 2022
  89. ^ "Exclusive: The American Song Contest on ERT!". EurovisionFun. February 17, 2022. Archived from the original on February 17, 2022. Retrieved February 17, 2022.
  90. ^ "Iceland: RÚV to Broadcast the American Song Contest". Eurovoix World. February 13, 2022. Archived from the original on February 15, 2022. Retrieved February 15, 2022.
  91. ^ "Američki Eurosong traje osam nedjelja, prenos na TVCG2" (in Serbo-Croatian). March 18, 2022. Retrieved March 21, 2022.
  92. ^ "Norway: NRK to Air American Song Contest on Saturday Nights From March 26". Eurovoix World. February 14, 2022. Archived from the original on March 15, 2022. Retrieved February 15, 2022.
  93. ^ "The American Song Contest". RTP (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on March 14, 2022. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  94. ^ Maja Nikolić, Olivera Kovačević (February 14, 2022). Koga šaljemo na Evroviziju? - gost Olivera Kovačević [Who are we sending to Eurovision? - guest Olivera Kovačević] (video) (in Serbian). Event occurs at 12:45. Retrieved February 16, 2022. RTS će prenositi, znači kupili smo prava da prenosimo" -"A šta, prenosite svih 8 nedelja?" "Svih 8 nedelja, da [RTS will be airing it, we bought the rights to air it" -"So you'll be airing it for all 8 weeks?" "Yeah, all 8 weeks]
  95. ^ Granger, Anthony. "Slovenia: RTVSLO Broadcasting the American Song Contest". Eurovoix World. Archived from the original on March 18, 2022. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  96. ^ Alabadí, Héctor (March 9, 2022). "RTVE emitirá American Song Contest 2022, la adaptación estadounidense de Eurovisión". FormulaTV (in Spanish). Noxvo. Archived from the original on March 9, 2022. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  97. ^ Granger, Anthony (January 26, 2022). "Sweden: SVT Secures Rights to Broadcast the American Song Contest". Eurovoix World. Archived from the original on January 27, 2022. Retrieved February 15, 2022.
  98. ^ Kryza, Andy. "Is America ready for its own Eurovision Song Contest?". TimeOut.com. Time Out. Archived from the original on May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  99. ^ Kirkland, Justin. "America Isn't Wholesome Enough to Pull Off its Own Eurovision Song Contest". MSN.com. Esquire. Archived from the original on May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  100. ^ Murphy, Chris (August 6, 2020). "The U.S. Will Get Its Grubby Paws on Eurovision with 'American Song Contest' TV Show". Vulture.com. Vox Media, LLC. Archived from the original on May 21, 2021. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
  101. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 2021 - Second Semi-Final - Press Conference". YouTube.com. Eurovision Song Contest. Archived from the original on May 21, 2021. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
  102. ^ Heritage, Stuart (March 7, 2022). "'Breathtakingly starry': is the American Song Contest about to outdo Eurovision?". The Guardian. Archived from the original on March 10, 2022. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  103. ^ Fallon, Kevin (March 22, 2022). "Not Even Earthbound Goddess Kelly Clarkson Can Save 'American Song Contest'". The Daily Beast.
  104. ^ Yahr, Emily (March 21, 2022). "What you missed on 'American Song Contest,' our country's chaotic new take on Eurovision". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 22, 2022.
  105. ^ Parker, Lyndsay (March 21, 2022). "Despite a Michael Bolton performance, 'American Song Contest' fails to fulfill its campy (Euro)vision". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved March 22, 2022.

External links

Original content from Wikipedia, shared with licence Creative Commons By-Sa - American Song Contest