Australia at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Australia at the Games of the XXXII Olympiad in Tokyo

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Australia at the
2020 Summer Olympics
Flag of Australia.svg
IOC codeAUS
NOCAustralian Olympic Committee
Websitewww.olympics.com.au
in Tokyo, Japan
Competitors336 in 23 sports
Summer Olympics appearances (overview)
Other related appearances
1906 Intercalated Games
 Australasia (1908–1912)

Australia is expected to compete at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Originally scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020, the Games have been postponed to 23 July to 8 August 2021, because of the COVID-19 pandemic.[1] Australia is one of only five countries to have sent athletes to every Summer Olympics of the modern era, alongside Great Britain, France, Greece, and Switzerland.

Before the official postponement, the country initially withdrew from the Games over the coronavirus pandemic concerns. The executive board of the Australian Olympic Committee unanimously voted to tell their athletes to prepare for a postponed Games.[2]

Competitors

Archery

Three Australian archers qualified for the men's events by reaching the quarterfinal stage of the men's team recurve at the 2019 World Archery Championships in 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands.[3]

On 6 March 2020, Rio 2016 bronze medalists Ryan Tyack and Taylor Worth, with David Barnes making his Olympic comeback after his debut in Athens 2004, were officially named to the men's archery team for the Games, based on their individual results at the four-part selection trials.[4][5]

Athlete Event Ranking round Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Score Seed Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
David Barnes Men's individual
Ryan Tyack
Taylor Worth
David Barnes
Ryan Tyack
Taylor Worth
Men's team N/A

Artistic swimming

Australia fielded a squad of eight artistic swimmers to compete in the women's duet and team event through an Oceania continental selection in the team free routine at the 2019 FINA World Championships in Gwangju, South Korea.[6] The artistic swimming squad, highlighted by Rio 2016 Olympians Hannah Cross, Emily Rogers, and Amie Thompson, were officially selected to the Australian roster for the Games on 26 February 2020.[7] Initially set to compete in both duet and team events at the rescheduled Games, Rio 2016 Olympian Rose Stackpole officially announced her retirement from the sport in August 2020. Instead, rookie Hannah Burkhill was selected to complete the rest of the squad on 4 September 2020.[8]

Athlete Event Technical routine Free routine (preliminary) Free routine (final)
Points Rank Points Total (technical + free) Rank Points Total (technical + free) Rank
 
 
Duet
Hannah Burkhill
Hannah Cross
Jane Fruzynski
Kiera Gazzard
Kirsten Kinash
Rachel Presser
Emily Rogers
Amie Thompson
Team N/A

Athletics

Australian athletes further achieved the entry standards, either by qualifying time or by world ranking, in the following track and field events (up to a maximum of three athletes in each event):[9][10]

On 19 August 2020, national champions Stewart McSweyn and Jessica Hull in the long-distance running, race walkers Jemima Montag and Rio 2016 bronze medalist Dane Bird-Smith, and reigning world javelin throw champion Kelsey-Lee Barber were the first track and field athletes officially selected to the Australian squad for the rescheduled Games.[11][12]

Key
  • Note–Ranks given for track events are within the athlete's heat only
  • Q = Qualified for the next round
  • q = Qualified for the next round as a fastest loser or, in field events, by position without achieving the qualifying target
  • NR = National record
  • N/A = Round not applicable for the event
  • Bye = Athlete not required to compete in round
Track & road events
Athlete Event Heat Final
Result Rank Result Rank
Dane Bird-Smith Men's 20 km walk N/A
Stewart McSweyn Men's 5000 m
Jessica Hull Women's 5000 m
Jemima Montag Women's 20 km walk N/A
Field events
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Distance Position Distance Position
Kelsey-Lee Barber Women's javelin throw

Basketball

Summary
Team Event Group stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Australia men's Men's tournament







Australia women's Women's tournament







Men's tournament

Australia men's basketball team qualified for the Olympics by advancing to the second round and securing an outright berth as the highest-ranked Oceania squad at the 2019 FIBA World Cup in China.[13][14]

Team roster
  • Men's team event – 1 team of 12 players

Women's tournament

Australia women's basketball team qualified for the Olympics as one of three highest-ranked eligible squads at the Bourges meet of the 2020 FIBA Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament.[15]

Team roster
  • Women's team event – 1 team of 12 players

Boxing

Australia entered five boxers (three men and two women) into the Olympic tournament. 2019 world bronze medalist Justis Huni (men's heavyweight) and 2018 Commonwealth Games champion Skye Nicolson (women's featherweight), along with rookies Alex Winwood (men's flyweight), Paulo Aokuso (men's light heavyweight), and Caitlin Parker (women's middleweight), secured the spots on the Australian squad by advancing to the semifinal match of their respective weight divisions at the 2020 Asia & Oceania Qualification Tournament in Amman, Jordan.[16]

Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Alex Winwood Men's flyweight
Paulo Aokuso Men's light heavyweight
Justis Huni Men's heavyweight N/A
Skye Nicolson Women's featherweight
Caitlin Parker Women's middleweight N/A

Canoeing

Slalom

Australian canoeists qualified one boat for each of the following classes through the 2019 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships in La Seu d'Urgell, Spain and the 2020 Oceania Championships in Auckland, New Zealand.[17] They must also compete at the Australian Open and in two trials of the Oceania Championships, both held in Penrith, New South Wales, to assure their selection to the nation's Olympic slalom canoeing team.

On 8 November 2019, multiple world and Olympic medalist Jessica Fox was officially selected to the Australian roster for her third consecutive Games, with Rio 2016 Olympian Lucien Delfour (men's K-1) and rookie Daniel Watkins (men's C-1) joining her three months later at the end of the selection trials.[18][19]

Athlete Event Preliminary Semifinal Final
Run 1 Rank Run 2 Rank Best Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Daniel Watkins Men's C-1
Lucien Delfour Men's K-1
Jessica Fox Women's C-1
Women's K-1

Sprint

Australian canoeists qualified a total of six boats in each of the following distances for the Games through the 2019 ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships in Szeged, Hungary and the 2020 Oceania Championships in Penrith, New South Wales.[20]

At the end of the two-stage selection trials, fourteen sprint canoe and kayak paddlers were officially named to the Australian team on 27 March 2020, with London 2012 gold medalist Murray Stewart in the men's K-4 500 metres making his third consecutive trip to the Games.[21]

Men
Athlete Event Heats Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Thomas Green K-1 200 m
  C-1 1000 m
Murray Stewart K-1 1000 m
Riley Fitzsimmons
Jordan Wood
K-2 1000 m
Murray Stewart
Lachlan Tame
Jean van der Westhuyzen
Jordan Wood
K-4 500 m N/A
Women
Athlete Event Heats Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Catherine McArthur K-1 500 m
Bernadette Wallace C-1 200 m
Josephine Bulmer
Bernadette Wallace
C-2 500 m
Catherine McArthur
Shannon Reynolds
K-2 500 m
Alyssa Bull
Jo Brigden-Jones
Alyce Burnett
Jaime Roberts
K-4 500 m N/A

Qualification Legend: FA = Qualify to final (medal); FB = Qualify to final B (non-medal)

Cycling

Road

Australia entered a squad of eight riders (four per gender) to compete in their respective Olympic road races, by virtue of their top 50 national finish (for men) and top 22 (for women) in the UCI World Ranking.[22]

Men
Athlete Event Time Rank
  Road race
Time trial
  Road race
Time trial
  Road race
 
Women
Athlete Event Time Rank
  Road race
Time trial
  Road race
Time trial
  Road race
 

Track

Following the completion of the 2020 UCI Track Cycling World Championships, Australian riders accumulated spots for both men and women in team sprint, team pursuit, madison, and omnium based on their country's results in the final UCI Olympic rankings. As a result of their place in the men's and women's team sprint, Australia won its right to enter two riders in both men's and women's sprint and men's and women's keirin.

The full Australian track cycling squad was officially named on 19 March 2020, with Matthew Glaetzer (men's team sprint) and Annette Edmondson (women's team pursuit) riding for their third consecutive Games.[23]

Sprint
Athlete Event Qualification Round 1 Repechage 1 Round 2 Repechage 2 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank
  Men's sprint  
 
   
 
Kaarle McCulloch Women's sprint  
 
Stephanie Morton  
 
Team sprint
Athlete Event Qualification Semifinals Final
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank
Matthew Glaetzer
Nathan Hart
Matthew Richardson
Men's team sprint  
 
Kaarle McCulloch
Stephanie Morton
Women's team sprint  
 

Qualification legend: FA=Gold medal final; FB=Bronze medal final

Pursuit
Athlete Event Qualification Semifinals Final
Time Rank Opponent
Results
Rank Opponent
Results
Rank
Leigh Howard
Kelland O'Brien
Luke Plapp
Alexander Porter
Sam Welsford
Men's team pursuit
Ashlee Ankudinoff
Georgia Baker
Annette Edmondson
Maeve Plouffe
Women's team pursuit
Keirin
Athlete Event 1st Round Repechage 2nd Round 3rd Round Final
Rank Rank Rank Rank Rank
  Men's keirin
 
Kaarle McCulloch Women's keirin
Stephanie Morton
Omnium
Athlete Event Scratch Race Tempo Race Elimination Race Points Race Total points Rank
Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points
Men's omnium
Women's omnium
Madison
Athlete Event Points Laps Rank
 
 
Men's madison
 
 
Women's madison

BMX

Athlete Event Seeding Final
Score Rank Score Rank
  Men's freestyle

Diving

Australian divers qualified for the following individual spots at the Games through the 2019 FINA World Championships and 2019 Oceania Championships. They must compete at the 2020 Australian Open Championships to assure their selection to the Olympic team.

Men
Athlete Event Preliminaries Semifinals Final
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
  3 m springboard
  10 m platform
 
Women
Athlete Event Preliminaries Semifinals Final
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
  3 m springboard
 
  10 m platform
 

Equestrian

Australian equestrians qualified a full squad in the team dressage competition by receiving a spare berth freed up by host nation Japan, as the top-ranked nation from Southeast Asia and Oceania, not yet qualified, at the 2018 FEI World Equestrian Games in Tryon, North Carolina, United States. Additionally, the country's eventing and show jumping teams qualified for the Games by virtue of a top-six finish each in the same tournament.[24][25][26]

Dressage

Athlete Horse Event Grand Prix Grand Prix Special Grand Prix Freestyle Total
Score Rank Score Rank Technical Artistic Score Rank
    Individual N/A
   
   
 
 
 
See above Team N/A

Qualification Legend: Q = Qualified for the final; q = Qualified for the final as a lucky loser

Eventing

Athlete Horse Event Dressage Cross-country Jumping Total
Qualifier Final
Penalties Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Total Rank Penalties Rank
    Individual
   
   
 
 
 
See above Team N/A

Jumping

Athlete Horse Event Qualification Final Total
Penalties Rank Penalties Rank Penalties Rank
    Individual
   
   
 
 
 
See above Team

Field hockey

Summary

Key:

Team Event Group Stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Australia men's Men's tournament
Australia women's Women's tournament

Men's tournament

Australia men's national field hockey team qualified for the Olympics by beating New Zealand with a unanimous 3–0 for a gold-medal victory at the 2019 Oceania Cup in Rockhampton, Queensland.[27]

Team roster
  • Men's team event – 1 team of 16 players
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Quarterfinals
1  Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1  India 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1  Japan (H) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1  New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1  Spain 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played on 25 July 2021. Source: FIH
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) matches won; 3) goal difference; 4) goals for; 5) head-to-head result; 6) field goals scored.
(H) Host.
24 July 2021 (2021-07-24)
09:30
v
Japan  v  Australia
Report

25 July 2021 (2021-07-25)
18:30
v
India  v  Australia
Report

27 July 2021 (2021-07-27)
09:30
v
Argentina  v  Australia
Report

28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
21:15
v
Australia  v  New Zealand
Report

30 July 2021 (2021-07-30)
10:00
v
Australia  v  Spain
Report

Women's tournament

Australia women's national field hockey team qualified for the Olympics by securing one of the seven tickets available and defeating Russia in a playoff at the Perth leg of the 2019 FIH Olympic Qualifiers.[28]

Team roster
  • Women's team event – 1 team of 16 players
Group play
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Quarterfinals
1  Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1  China 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1  Japan (H) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1  New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1  Spain 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played on 26 July 2020. Source: FIH
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) matches won; 3) goal difference; 4) goals for; 5) head-to-head result; 6) field goals scored.
(H) Host.
25 July 2021 (2021-07-25)
10:00
v
Australia  v  Spain
Report

26 July 2021 (2021-07-26)
12:15
v
Australia  v  China
Report

28 July 2021 (2021-07-28)
18:30
v
Japan  v  Australia
Report

29 July 2021 (2021-07-29)
21:15
v
New Zealand  v  Australia
Report

31 July 2021 (2021-07-31)
11:45
v
Argentina  v  Australia
Report

Football

Summary

Key:

Team Event Group Stage Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Australia men's Men's tournament
Australia women's Women's tournament

Men's tournament

For the first time in twelve years, Australia men's football team qualified for the Games by winning the bronze medal and securing the last of three available berths of the 2020 AFC U-23 Championship in Thailand.[29][30]

Team roster
  • Men's team event – 1 team of 18 players

Women's tournament

Australia women's football team qualified for the Games by defeating Vietnam in a two-legged playoff of the 2020 AFC Olympic Qualifying Tournament.[31]

Team roster
  • Women's team event – 1 team of 18 players

Gymnastics

Artistic

Australia entered two artistic gymnasts into the Olympic competition. American-based Tyson Bull secured one of the two places available for individual-based gymnasts, neither part of the team nor qualified through the all-around, in the horizontal bar exercise, while an additional berth was awarded to the Australian female gymnast, who participated in the women's individual all-around and apparatus events at the 2019 World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany.[32][33]

Men
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank
F PH R V PB HB F PH R V PB HB
Tyson Bull Horizontal bar N/A N/A
Women
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Apparatus Total Rank Apparatus Total Rank
V UB BB F V UB BB F
All-around

Modern pentathlon

Australia qualified two modern pentathletes for the Games. London 2012 Olympian Edward Fernon and Nanjing 2014 Youth Olympian Marina Carrier, who eventually received a berth forfeited by New Zealand, secured their selection as Oceania's top-ranked modern pentathletes at the 2019 Asia & Oceania Championships in Kunming, China.[34][35]

Athlete Event Fencing
(épée one touch)
Swimming
(200 m freestyle)
Riding
(show jumping)
Combined: shooting/running
(10 m air pistol)/(3200 m)
Total points Final rank
RR BR Rank MP points Time Rank MP points Penalties Rank MP points Time Rank MP Points
Edward Fernon Men's
Marina Carrier Women's

Rowing

Australia qualified a total of eight boats for each of the following rowing classes into the Olympic regatta, with the majority of crews confirming Olympic places for their boats at the 2019 FISA World Championships in Ottensheim, Austria.[36][37]

Men
Athlete Event Heats Repechage Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
 
 
Pair
 
 
 
 
Four N/A
 
 
 
 
Quadruple sculls N/A
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eight N/A
Women
Athlete Event Heats Repechage Semifinals Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
 
 
Pair
 
 
Double sculls
 
 
 
 
Four N/A
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eight N/A

Qualification Legend: FA=Final A (medal); FB=Final B (non-medal); FC=Final C (non-medal); FD=Final D (non-medal); FE=Final E (non-medal); FF=Final F (non-medal); SA/B=Semifinals A/B; SC/D=Semifinals C/D; SE/F=Semifinals E/F; QF=Quarterfinals; R=Repechage

Rugby sevens

Men's tournament

Australia national rugby sevens team qualified for the Olympics by securing an outright berth with a gold-medal victory at the 2019 Oceania Sevens Championships in Suva, Fiji.[38]

Team roster
  • Men's team event – 1 team of 12 players

Women's tournament

Australia women's national rugby sevens team qualified for the Olympics by finishing among the top four and securing an outright berth at the 2018–19 World Rugby Women's Sevens Series.[39]

Team roster
  • Women's team event – 1 team of 12 players

Sailing

Australian sailors qualified one boat in each of the following classes through the 2018 Sailing World Championships, the class-associated Worlds, and the continental regattas.[40][41][42]

On 20 September 2019, the Australian Olympic Committee announced the first set of sailors selected for Tokyo 2020, namely Rio 2016 silver medalists and defending world 470 champions Mathew Belcher and William Ryan and world's current top-ranked Laser sailor Matthew Wearn.[43] The skiff crews (49er and 49erFX), highlighted by Ryan's sister and fellow Rio 2016 Olympian Jaime Ryan, were named to the sailing team on 27 February 2020, while Nacra 17 cousins Jason Waterhouse and Lisa Darmanin were set to defend their Rio 2016 podium finish at the Enoshima regatta, after being selected four days later.[44][45] Laser Radial sailor Mara Stransky joined the sailing roster on 19 March 2020.[46]

Men
Athlete Event Race Net points Final rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
Matthew Wearn Laser N/A
Finn N/A
Mathew Belcher
William Ryan
470 N/A
Sam Phillips
William Phillips
49er
Women
Athlete Event Race Net points Final rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
Mara Stransky Laser Radial N/A
 
 
470 N/A
Tess Lloyd
Jaime Ryan
49erFX
Mixed
Athlete Event Race Net points Final rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 M*
Jason Waterhouse
Lisa Darmanin
Nacra 17

M = Medal race; EL = Eliminated – did not advance into the medal race

Shooting

Australian shooters achieved quota places for the following events by virtue of their best finishes at the 2018 ISSF World Championships, the 2019 ISSF World Cup series, and Oceania Championships, as long as they obtained a minimum qualifying score (MQS) by 31 May 2020.[47]

On 17 April 2020, the Australian Olympic Committee officially announced a roster of fifteen shooters selected for the rescheduled Olympics, with pistol ace Daniel Repacholi leading them to his remarkable fifth Games, Kazakh import Dina Aspandiyarova to her fourth, and rifle marksman Dane Sampson to his third.[48]

Men
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Paul Adams Skeet
Sergei Evglevski 25 m rapid fire pistol
Thomas Grice Trap
Alex Hoberg 10 m air rifle
Daniel Repacholi 10 m air pistol
Jack Rossiter 50 m rifle 3 positions
Dane Sampson 10 m air rifle
50 m rifle 3 positions
James Willett Trap
Women
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Dina Aspandiyarova 10 m air pistol
25 m pistol
Laura Coles Skeet
Elise Collier 10 m air rifle
Elena Galiabovitch 10 m air pistol
25 m pistol
Katarina Kowplos 10 m air rifle
50 m rifle 3 positions
Laetisha Scanlan Trap
Penny Smith
Mixed
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Alex Hoberg
Elise Collier
10 m air rifle team
Dane Sampson
Katarina Kowplos
Sergei Evglevski
Elena Galiabovitch
10 m air pistol team
Daniel Repacholi
Dina Aspandiyarova
Thomas Grice
Penny Smith
Trap team
James Willett
Laetisha Scanlan

Softball

Australia women's softball team qualified for the Olympics by winning the gold medal and securing a lone outright berth at the final match of the WBSC Women's Softball Qualifying Event for Asia and Oceania in Shanghai, China.[49]

Team roster
  • Women's team event – 1 team of 15 players
Group play
Team W L RS RA WIN% GB Tiebreaker
 Australia 0 0 0 0 .000
 Canada 0 0 0 0 .000
 Italy 0 0 0 0 .000
 Japan 0 0 0 0 .000
 Mexico 0 0 0 0 .000
 United States 0 0 0 0 .000
21 July 09:00
Fukushima Azuma Baseball Stadium
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Japan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
22 July 15:00
Fukushima Azuma Baseball Stadium
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
 Italy 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
24 July 10:00
Yokohama Stadium
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Canada 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
25 July 10:00
Yokohama Stadium
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 United States 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
26 July 20:00
Yokohama Stadium
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
 Mexico 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Surfing

Australia sent four surfers (two per gender) to compete in their respective shortboard races at the Games. Julian Wilson, Owen Wright, Sally Fitzgibbons, and Stephanie Gilmore finished within the top ten (for men) and top eight (for women), respectively, of those eligible for qualification in the World Surf League rankings to secure their places on the Australian roster for Tokyo 2020.[50][51]

Athlete Event Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Quarterfinal Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Julian Wilson Men's shortboard
Owen Wright
Sally Fitzgibbons Women's shortboard
Stephanie Gilmore

Swimming

Australian swimmers further achieved qualifying standards in the following events (up to a maximum of 2 swimmers in each event at the Olympic Qualifying Time (OQT), and potentially 1 at the Olympic Selection Time (OST)):[52][53] To assure their nomination to the Olympic team, swimmers must finish in the top two of each individual pool event under both the benchmark standard and the FINA A-cut at the 2020 Australian Championships and Olympic Trials (14 to 19 June) in Adelaide.

Men
Athlete Event Heat Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
 
 
 
 
4 × 100 m freestyle relay N/A
 
 
 
 
4 × 200 m freestyle relay N/A
 
 
 
 
4 × 100 m medley relay N/A
Women
Athlete Event Heat Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Kareena Lee 10 km open water N/A
 
 
 
 
4 × 100 m freestyle relay N/A
 
 
 
 
4 × 200 m freestyle relay N/A
 
 
 
 
4 × 100 m medley relay N/A
Mixed
Athlete Event Heat Final
Time Rank Time Rank
 
 
 
 
4 × 100 m medley relay

Table tennis

Australia entered six athletes into the table tennis competition at the Games. The men's and women's teams secured their respective Olympic berths by winning the gold medal each at the Oceania Qualification Event in Mornington, Victoria, permitting a maximum of two starters to compete each in the men's and women's singles tournament.[54]

On 22 July 2020, Australian Olympic Committee nominated Rio 2016 Olympians David Powell and Chris Yan, returning Olympian Stephanie Sang from Beijing 2008, and rookie Michelle Bromley to compete in their respective singles tournaments for Tokyo 2020, following their top two finish at a national selection meet in Melbourne.[55]

Men
Athlete Event Preliminary Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
David Powell Singles
Chris Yan
David Powell
Chris Yan
 
Team N/A
Women
Athlete Event Preliminary Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Michelle Bromley Singles
Stephanie Sang
Michelle Bromley
Stephanie Sang
 
Team N/A

Taekwondo

Australia entered four athletes into the taekwondo competition at the Games. Two-time Olympian Safwan Khalil (men's 58 kg), Jack Marton (men's 80 kg), Stacey Hymer (women's 57 kg), and Reba Stewart (women's +67 kg) topped the podium in each of their respective weight classes to secure the spots on the Australian squad at the 2020 Oceania Qualification Tournament in Gold Coast, Queensland.[56][57]

Athlete Event Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Repechage Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Safwan Khalil Men's −58 kg
Jack Marton Men's −80 kg
Stacey Hymer Women's −57 kg
Reba Stewart Women's +67 kg

Water polo

Men's tournament

Team roster
  • Men's team event – 1 team of 11 players

Women's tournament

Team roster
  • Women's team event – 1 team of 11 players

References

  1. ^ "Joint Statement from the International Olympic Committee and the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee". Olympics. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  2. ^ Forsaith, Rob (23 March 2020). "Prepare for Olympic delay: AOC to athletes". Australian Associated Press. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  3. ^ "12 countries qualify team places for Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at World Championships". World Archery. 12 June 2019. Retrieved 13 June 2019.
  4. ^ "Rio medallists and Athens comeback on target for Tokyo 2020 Archery". Australian Olympic Committee. 6 March 2020. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Athens Olympian Dave Barnes returning to Australian team for Tokyo 2020". World Archery. 10 March 2020. Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  6. ^ "Mission accomplished for Aussie synchro girls". Australian Olympic Committee. 18 July 2019. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  7. ^ "Artistic Swimmers in Synch for Tokyo 2020 Selection". Australian Olympic Committee. 26 February 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  8. ^ "Artistic Swimmer Hannah Burkhill selected for Tokyo 2020". Australian Olympic Committee. 4 September 2020. Retrieved 5 September 2020.
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Original content from Wikipedia, shared with licence Creative Commons By-Sa - Australia at the 2020 Summer Olympics