Bill Gates's house building

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Bill and Melinda Gates' house
Bill and Melinda Gates' mansion annat
General information
Architectural stylePacific lodge
LocationMedina, Washington, United States
Coordinates47°37′40″N 122°14′31″W / 47.62774°N 122.24194°W / 47.62774; -122.24194Coordinates: 47°37′40″N 122°14′31″W / 47.62774°N 122.24194°W / 47.62774; -122.24194
Technical details
Structural systemEarth-sheltered home

Bill and Melinda Gates own a mansion that overlooks Lake Washington in Medina, Washington. The 66,000-square-foot (6,100 m2) mansion incorporates technology in its design.[clarification needed][1]

In 2009, property taxes were reported to be US $1.063 million on a total assessed value of US $147.5 million.[2]

Design and features

The house was designed collaboratively by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and Cutler-Anderson Architects of Bainbridge Island, Washington.[3][4][5]

The mansion is a modern design in the Pacific lodge style, with classic features such as a private library with a dome-shaped roof and oculus.[6][7] The house features an estate-wide server system, a 60-foot (18 m) swimming pool with an underwater music system, a 2,500-square-foot (230 m2) gym, and a 1,000-square-foot (93 m2) dining room.[8]

In popular culture

The house in 2015. Many trees block much of the house from view from Lake Washington.

The house was made fun of in Dilbert in January 1997 when the lead character was forced to become a towel boy after his failure to read an end-user license agreement over purchased Microsoft software.[9]

Many online news articles call the house Xanadu 2.0, a reference to the motion picture Citizen Kane.[10][11]

References

  1. ^ Folkers, Richard (November 23, 1997). "Bill Gates' stately pleasure dome and futuristic home". Archived from the original on September 17, 2020. Retrieved August 24, 2017.
  2. ^ Anderson, Rick (May 16, 2008). "Taxman Cometh". Seattle Weekly. Archived from the original on April 17, 2013.
  3. ^ "Bohlin Cywinski Jackson.com". Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved February 21, 2008.
  4. ^ "Cutler Anderson Architects". cutler-anderson.com. Archived from the original on April 28, 2001. Retrieved August 10, 2016.
  5. ^ Becraft, Michael B. (2014). Bill Gates: A Biography (Greenwood Biographies). Greenwood. p. 130. ISBN 978-1440830136. Archived from the original on 2020-09-17. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  6. ^ "Technology: Bill Gates' House" Archived January 4, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved July 24, 2012.
  7. ^ "Pool Building" Archived October 11, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved July 24, 2012.
  8. ^ "Photo Gallery: Homes Of The Billionaires". Forbes. March 11, 2009. Archived from the original on September 17, 2020. Retrieved September 17, 2020.
  9. ^ "Tuesday January 14, 1997". Dilbert. Archived from the original on September 17, 2020. Retrieved September 17, 2020.
  10. ^ "19 crazy facts about Bill Gates' $127 million mansion".
  11. ^ "Home feature: Bill Gates' mansion".

External links

Original content from Wikipedia, shared with licence Creative Commons By-Sa - Bill Gates's house