Features of the Marvel Cinematic Universe

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The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) media franchise features many fictional elements including locations, weapons, and artifacts. While many of these features are based on elements that originally appeared in the American comic books published by Marvel Comics, some features were created specifically for the MCU.

Locations

Earth

The Fort Bard fortified complex in Italy, where the opening sequence of Avengers: Age of Ultron was filmed
Greenwich Village, location of the New York Sanctum
  • The New York Sanctum (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) in Greenwich Village, New York City is one of the three Sanctum Sanctorums on Earth. Located on 177A Bleecker Street,[39][40] it is used by the Masters of the Mystic Arts to store various relics and serves as one of their bases, formerly guarded by Daniel Drumm until he was replaced by Stephen Strange following his death. In 2017, Strange detains Loki and invites Thor to the Sanctum, directing him to his father Odin. One year later, following his escape from the Statesman, Bruce Banner crash lands in the New York Sanctum and letter Strange and Tony Stark about the threat of Thanos.[41] Following the Blip, the Sanctum becomes covered in snow for unknown reasons.[42] A set for the building was constructed at Longcross Studios in Surrey, England for Doctor Strange, which was also used in Thor: Ragnarok before it was demolished.[31][43]
  • Puente Antiguo is a town in New Mexico where astrophysicist Jane Foster, her intern Darcy Lewis, and her mentor Erik Selvig were studying atmospheric disturbances when they encounter Thor arriving via the Bifröst. Upon learning of Mjölnir's location nearby, Thor storms the S.H.I.E.L.D. facility surrounding the hammer before being arrested by Phil Coulson. Later, following the arrival of Sif and the Warriors Three, the town becomes the battleground for a fight between Thor and the Destroyer, who had been sent by his brother Loki. Cerro Pelon Ranch in Galisteo, New Mexico doubled as the city in Thor,[44] which was extensively modified for the film.[45][46]
  • The Pym Technology Headquarters was the main headquarters of Pym Technologies, located on Treasure Island, San Francisco. It was destroyed by Scott Lang during his fight with Darren Cross. The State Archives building in Downtown Atlanta doubled as the building in Ant-Man.[47][48]
  • The Raft (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a maximum security prison, with Thaddeus Ross serving as warden. Sam Wilson, Wanda Maximoff, Clint Barton, and Scott Lang were remanded to the prison after helping Steve Rogers and Bucky Barnes evade capture, thus violating the Sokovia Accords. However, they are later broken out by Steve Rogers and Natasha Romanoff, though Barton and Lang wished to return to their families under house arrest. In 2024, days following his escape from a prison in Berlin, the Dora Milaje of Wakanda detain Helmut Zemo to the Raft via the Royal Talon Fighter.[49] Designed to hold super-powered individuals, the prison is located deep in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.[50][51]
Ostankino Tower, which inspired the design of the Red Room
Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, location of the Stark Expo
  • Sokovia (the inspiration for the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe, located between Slovakia and Czechia. It is the home of Wanda and Pietro Maximoff, as well as Helmut Zemo. During the Hydra Uprising, Hydra set up a research facility in Sokovia, where they experimented on Loki's scepter. It later became the battleground for a conflict between the Avengers and Ultron, which resulted in the country's capital city, Novi Grad, being completely destroyed, and led to the ratification of the Sokovia Accords. The country was annexed by the surrounding countries soon after. Scenes set in the city where filmed in the Aosta Valley region in Italy in Avengers: Age of Ultron,[57] in which local storefronts were replaced with Cyrillic script.[58] Hendon Police College, a training facility for London's Metropolitan Police Service was also used to portray a city in Sokovia.[59]
  • The Stark Eco-Compound[60] is the residence of Tony Stark, Pepper Potts, and their daughter, Morgan Stark. Located in the countryside of Upstate New York,[1] it was built by Tony Stark shortly after his marriage with Potts, and he lived there until his death in 2023. His funeral is also held in front of his residence.
  • The Stark Expo, also known as the World Exposition of Tomorrow, is an exposition located at the Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in Queens, New York City. Started by Tony Stark's father, Howard, it brings together great minds and showcases new technology.[61][62][63] Past attendees include Phineas Horton (showcasing his Synthetic Man) and Peter Parker.[64]
Tønsberg Wharf, Tønsberg, Norway
  • The Stark Mansion was the private residence of Tony Stark, located at 10880 Malibu Point, Malibu, California. It was ultimately destroyed by Aldrich Killian (posing as the Mandarin) in a missile attack. The mansion's exterior shots in Iron Man were digitally added to footage of Point Dume in Malibu,[65] while its interior shots were filmed at soundstages in Playa Vista, Los Angeles.[66]
  • The Ten Rings Headquarters is the main base of operations of the Ten Rings criminal organization, located on an unknown mountaintop in China. The compound was founded a thousand years ago by Wenwu during his early years as a warlord, and also served as his personal retreat for him and his family, with Shang-Chi and Xialing having spent their childhoods there. The compound includes a throne room, training grounds for its warriors, a library housed with relics of Ta Lo, a dungeon, and an underground parking lot. After Xialing assumes leadership of the Ten Rings, she redecorates the compound with graffiti reminiscent of her Golden Daggers Club.
  • Tønsberg is a village in Norway which housed the Tesseract for centuries until Johann Schmidt stole it during World War II.[67] The town is also where Odin resides in his final days after being banished by Loki. Following the Blip, the town is renamed New Asgard and serves as a refuge for the surviving Asgardians.[68]
In the MCU, Wakanda is located just north of Lake Turkana, at a point bordering Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda and South Sudan.
  • The Triskelion (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a compound located on Little Island south of the Theodore Roosevelt Island at the foot of the Roosevelt Bridge which acted as the main base of operations for S.H.I.E.L.D.. The base is taken over by Hydra during their uprising from within S.H.I.E.L.D. in order to use three weaponized Helicarriers to kill people they deem to be threats. It is later destroyed by a disabled Helicarrier. While most shots of Washington, D.C. in Captain America: The Winter Soldier were digitally created due to numerous flight restrictions in the city, aerial footage of the city was used for live-action plate photography for shots which involved the Triskelion.[69]
  • Wakanda (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a highly advanced African nation that formerly posed as a struggling third world country before it was opened up to the world by King T'Challa. Its capital city is Birnin Zana, also known as the Golden City. The main language is Xhosa. It consists of lush river valleys, mountain ranges rich in natural resources, and a capital city that integrates space-age technology with traditional designs. Wakanda consists of five tribes: the River Tribe, the Mining Tribe, the Merchant Tribe, the Border Tribe, and the Jabari Tribe. The ruling family are a tribe of their own, the Golden Tribe (also referred to as the Panther Tribe), formed by the relatives and heirs of Bashenga, the first Black Panther. The country has been noted for its Afrofuturism,[70][71][72] with the country cited as a possible example of how African nations might have developed in the absence of European colonialism.[73][74][75]
  • Westview is a town in New Jersey. Sometime between 2016 and 2018, the Vision bought a plot of land in the town for himself and Wanda Maximoff to live on, although only the foundations of a house were ever built, and Vision was killed soon after by Thanos. In 2023, two weeks after the Blip, Wanda Maximoff arrives at the plot of land that she and Vision had purchased and inadvertently created an anomaly around the town, which placed almost all of its inhabitants to be placed under mind control. After the dissolution of the barrier, the residents escape, and Wanda's children and Vision disintegrate.

Space

Hypothetical illustration of an ice planet
  • Contraxia is an ice planet which is commonly visited by the Ravagers as a place to relax, especially at the Iron Lotus brothel. Sometime in 2014, Stakar Ogord come across Yondu on Contraxia, while Howard the Duck also appears in the bar. A set for the Iron Lotus was built at Pinewood Atlanta Studios in Atlanta, Georgia, which Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 production designer Scott Chambliss sought to make it appear to have been put together from "repurposed junk", creating a "neon jungle" covered in ice and snow.[77]
  • Ego's planet (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a living mass of matter that the Celestial Ego formed around himself thousands of years ago, causing him to resemble a large red planet with a face. The planet is destroyed by a bomb planted by the Guardians of the Galaxy in Ego's brain, and is also destroyed by Ultron in an alternate reality.[13] Visual effects of the planet in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 were provided by Animal Logic, Method Studios, and Weta Digital. Weta and Animal Logic's work were heavily based on fractal art, including Apollonian gaskets and Mandelbulbs,[76][78] and was described by director James Gunn as "the biggest visual effect of all time".[79]
  • The Garden,[80] also known as Planet 0259-S[81] and Titan II,[82] is a greenfield planet where Thanos resides following his "retirement". After fulfilling his lifelong goal of wiping out half of the Universe, he teleports to the planet and smiles at the sunrise as he reflects on his success. Three weeks later, the Avengers travel there and decapitate him upon learning that he had destroyed the Infinity Stones.
  • Hala (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is the Kree homeworld planet, as well as the capital of the Kree Empire. It is ruled by the Supreme Intelligence.
  • Knowhere (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is the severed head of an ancient deceased Celestial which acts as the homeworld of the Exitar mining colony, founded by the Collector. In 2014, the Guardians of the Galaxy arrive at Knowhere to sell the Power Stone to the Collector, but the museum is destroyed before Ronan's forces arrive. In 2018, Thanos attacks Knowhere and acquires the Reality Stone from Tivan before destroying the place. Star-Lord T'Challa leads the Ravagers on a mission against the Collector on Knowhere in an alternate reality.[83] Visual effects of the planet were created by Framestore.[84]
  • The Kyln (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a high-security prison run by the Nova Corps. The Guardians of the Galaxy are brought together in the prison and execute an escape plan, with Ronan ordering Nebula to massacre all of its inhabitants upon learning of Gamora's escape. Visual effects of the prison were created by Framestore.[84]
  • Lamentis-1 is a purple-hued moon that is destroyed by a nearby planet in the year 2077. Loki and Sylvie arrive on the moon through a Time Door, but are unable to escape due to their TemPad having run out of power. After failing to board an Ark to escape, they are rescued and recaptured by the TVA. Loki production designer Kasra Farahani opted to build an enormous practical set piece of the town Sharoo instead of utilizing Industrial Light & Magic (ILM)'s StageCraft technology,[85] implementing a "blocky ziggurat language" and using black-light paint in order to distinguish it from other alien worlds in the MCU.[86] Visual effects for the moon were provided by Digital Domain, who also considered making the planet "a lush world covered in greenery", one "dominated by massive oceans", and one containing a molten core which later implodes.[87]
  • Morag is an abandoned ocean planet located in the Andromeda Galaxy, with its oceans only receding to expose its landmasses every 300 years. In 2014, Peter Quill arrives on the planet in order to obtain the Orb, a mission that is replicated by Star-Lord T'Challa in an alternate reality.[83] In 2023, James Rhodes and Nebula time-travel to 2014 Morag and knock Peter Quill out before acquiring the Orb. Visual effects of the planet in Guardians of the Galaxy were created by Moving Picture Company (MPC).[84]
  • Sakaar (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a planet ruled by the Grandmaster, who holds his Contest of Champions on the planet. Notable visitors include Bruce Banner, Thor, and Loki. The planet is destroyed by Ultron in an alternate reality.[13] The art of Thor co-creator Jack Kirby served as one of the primary inspirations for Sakaar's depiction in Thor: Ragnarok,[88] and was described by executive producer Brad Winderbaum as "the toilet of the Universe" surrounded by an endless number of wormholes.[89] A set for the planet was constructed at the Village Roadshow Studios in Oxenford, Queensland, including the Grandmaster's palace and the surrounding junkyard.[90] Visual effects for the planet's junkyard landscape and wormholes were created by Double Negative and Digital Domain.[91] A Sakaarian national anthem is featured in an unused version of the second post-credits scene of Ragnarok, which was improvised by Jeff Goldblum and Waititi.[92]
  • The Sanctuary is an asteroid field inhabited by the Chitauri which acts as the domain of Thanos, where he gives orders to The Other and Ronan. Visual effects of the location were created by Digital Domain in The Avengers.[93]
  • The Sovereign is a amalgamation of planets that were artificially fused together and the homeworld to the genetically-engineered species of the same name. Powered by Anulax Batteries, it is ruled by Ayesha. The amalgamation is destroyed by Ultron in an alternate reality.[13] Visual effects for Ayesha's lair in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 were provided by Framestore,[94] while Luma Pictures worked on the Sovereign world and its people.[76] A set for the planet was also built at Pinewood Atlanta Studios in Atlanta, Georgia, which employed a "1950s pulp fiction variation on 1930s art deco design aesthetic".[77]
  • Titan (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is an exoplanet and the homeworld of Thanos before its inhabitants were wiped out from overpopulation.[95] In 2018, Tony Stark, Stephen Strange, and Peter Parker ally with the Guardians of the Galaxy to confront Thanos, who acquires the Time Stone following a battle and teleports to Wakanda.
  • Vormir (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a barren planet and the location of the Soul Stone, which is guarded by the Red Skull. In 2018, Thanos coerces Gamora into revealing the Stone's location before teleporting there, where she is sacrificed in order for Thanos to obtain the Stone. Similarly, Natasha Romanoff sacrifices herself in 2023 in order for Clint Barton to acquire the Stone.
  • Xandar (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is the capital of the Nova Empire and home of the Nova Corps. In 2014, Ronan attacks Xandar in retaliation for the Kree–Nova War, killing most of the Nova Corps before being defeated by the Guardians of the Galaxy and the Ravagers. It is later decimated by Thanos in 2018, an event replicated by Ultron in an alternate reality.[13] Scenes set on the planet in Guardians of the Galaxy were filmed at Millennium Bridge, London,[96][97] while visual effects were done by Moving Picture Company (MPC).[84]

Nine Realms

Iceland doubled as Svartalfheim in Thor: The Dark World.[98]
  • Svartalfheim (based on the Norse mythological location of the same name), also known as the Dark World, is a planet that is wreathed in perpetual darkness and ruled by the Dark Elves, led by Malekith the Accursed. Visual effects of Thor: The Dark World's prologue scene were done by Blur Studio, and mainly consisted of CGI with live-action shots interwoven throughout.[98] Subsequent scenes in the film were shot in Iceland, with Double Negative adding ruins, mountains, Dark Elf ships, and skies.[98]
  • Vanaheim (based on the Norse mythological location of the same name) is a densely wooded planet, home of the Vanir, including Hogun. It is also the site of a battle between the Æsir-Vanir forces and the Marauders, a band of pirates.
  • Yggdrasil (based on the Norse mythological location of the same name) is a network of galactic superclusters connecting the Nine Realms, shaped like a tree, with each branch connecting a realm. It is described as a "cosmic nimbus".

Multiverse

Dimensions

  • The Astral Dimension (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name), also known as the Astral plane or the Ancestral Plane, is a dimension in which the soul resides outside the body. It is mainly featured in the form of astral projection, although in Black Panther, it is a physical location, with deceased Wakandans residing there and able to communicate with the living upon ingestion of the heart-shaped herb. The fight sequence in Doctor Strange between Stephen Strange and a Zealot's astral forms was the first scene in the film written by director Scott Derrickson, who was inspired by the comic Doctor Strange: The Oath.[108] Visual effects for scenes set in the dimension were provided by Framestore, who described the process as "one of the hardest effects [they've] had to deal with".[109]
Hearst Castle inspired the design of the Citadel at the End of Time.[110]
  • The Citadel at the End of Time is a castle atop an asteroid at the end of time where He Who Remains (as well as Miss Minutes) resides and watches over the Sacred Timeline, which orbits the place. Carved in situ from the asteroid and made a "black stone with gold vein embellishments", the Citadel is mostly abandoned except for He Who Remains' office, with Loki production designer Kasra Farahani intending to reflect the loneliness of He Who Remains. Outside his office, there are also numerous 13-foot-tall statues of "sentinels of time" in the "Hall of Heroes", each holding half of an hourglass. A nebula outside the window and a fireplace were used as light sources in He's office.[111] The design and architecture of the Citadel was inspired by Hearst Castle and compared to Sunset Boulevard.[110][112]
  • The Dark Dimension (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a timeless dimension inhabited by Dormammu. It is an amalgamation of itself and all other dimensions Dormammu had conquered and absorbed into it. Stephen Strange visits it to bargain with Dormammu after Kaecilius contacts it to absorb the Earth. Visual effects of the dimension in Doctor Strange were provided by Method Studios and Luma Pictures.[109] Doctor Strange visual effects supervisor Stephane Ceretti described the Dark Dimension as a "dynamic environment", with the Luma team using art by Steve Ditko as a reference.[113]
  • The Mirror Dimension is a dimension which causes the surroundings to be reflected in different directions, similar to the function of a mirror, without affecting the real world. Due to its nature, it is used by the sorcerers for training and controlling threats. Stephen Strange utilized it in an attempt to defeat Kaecilius and Thanos, while the Ancient One also utilized it during the Battle of New York. According to Doctor Strange director Scott Derrickson, the action sequences set in the dimension is an attempt to take Inception "to the Nth degree and take it way more surreal and way farther".[114] Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) was primarily responsible for visual effects of the Manhattan folding sequence, which consisted of 200 shots and was mainly CGI, although some real-life shots of New York were used.[109] Meanwhile, Luma Pictures worked on the first mirror sequence at the beginning of the film.[109]
  • The Quantum Realm (based on the Microverse from the Marvel Comics) is a realm that subverts the normal order of time and is only accessible via subatomic shrinking or a Sling Ring. It was where Janet van Dyne was stranded for thirty years before being rescued. Scott Lang is also stranded there for five years, although he only experienced five hours in the realm; the Avengers later use it to time travel and reverse the Blip. The Quantum Realm was named as such because it could not be called "Microverse" due to legal reasons;[115] quantum physicist and staff researcher at the California Institute of Technology Spiros Michalakis suggested the new name.[116] Visual effects for the dimension in Ant-Man, Doctor Strange, and Ant-Man and the Wasp were provided by Method Studios.[109]
  • The Soul World (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name), also known as the Way Station,[117] is a pocket dimension inside the Soul Stone[118] where Thanos finds himself in for a brief moment after he snapped his fingers and wiped out half of the Universe's population, where he encountered a young Gamora. Christopher Markus, co-writer of Avengers: Endgame, also stated that Banner met the Hulk in the Soul World. The Soul World was originally also going to be visited by Tony Stark in a deleted scene of Avengers: Endgame, where he would have met an older version of his daughter Morgan.[119]
  • Ta Lo (based on the Marvel Comics location of the same name) is a mystical heavenly realm inhabited by Chinese mythological creatures, such as dragons (including the Great Protector), fenghuang, haetae, hundun (including Morris), huli jing, and qilin.[120][121] Thousands of years ago, the Dweller-in-Darkness attacked the realm, but was sealed away by the people of Ta Lo and the Great Protector in the Dark Gate. Ta Lo can be accessed from Earth through a portal located in China, which is protected by an enchanted bamboo forest; however, the forest can be safely traversed on the first day of the Qingming Festival.[122] In an interview, Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings director Destin Daniel Cretton expressed excitement in further exploration of the realm in the future.[123] Visual effects for the various mythological creatures were provided by Trixter in the film,[124] with some audiences confusing them with characters from Pokémon in early screenings.[125]
The Atlanta Marriott Marquis was used to portray the TVA Headquarters.[126]

Objects

Vehicles

A typical Ford Econoline
  • The Royal Talon Fighter is an advanced Wakandan aircraft. The aircraft, resembling a mask from the top and bottom, is capable of high speed flight and features cloaking technology in order to render it invisible to the naked eye. It is used by T'Challa and the Dora Milaje.
  • The Sanctuary II is a large twelve-mile long spaceship owned by Thanos, which serves as an orbital base while an invasion is in progress as well as a heavily armed warcraft.[142] It can also carry four Q-Ships under its wings. Following the Time Heist, an alternate version of Thanos and his army from 2014 is transported to 2023 on the Sanctuary II, and the Avengers Compound is destroyed by its missiles. During the subsequent Battle of Earth, Thanos orders his troops to "rain fire" on the battlefield, but the ship is destroyed by Carol Danvers.
  • The Statesman is a large spaceship owned by the Grandmaster that was stolen by Loki and used to transport the Asgardians away from Asgard before it was destroyed during Ragnarök. However, on its way to Earth, it is attacked by the Sanctuary II and destroyed by Thanos using the Power Stone.

Suits

A cosplay of the Black Panther suit at FanimeCon 2018
  • The Black Panther suit (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name) is a protective nanotech suit woven from vibranium that is worn by the King of Wakanda in his duties as the Black Panther. The suit features retractable claws made of vibranium and is nearly impenetrable. Versions of the suit have been worn by T'Chaka, T'Challa, and N'Jadaka. T'Challa's second suit is also able to be shrunk down into a necklace as well as absorb energy for future redistribution. The suit is a combination of a practical costume and visual effects, featuring a vibranium mesh weave similar to chainmail.[150] Captain America: Civil War costume designer Judianna Makovsky called the Black Panther costume "difficult" since "you needed sort of a feline body, but it's hard and practical at the same time. You needed a feeling of some sort of ethnicity in there, but of a world [Wakanda] we weren't really creating yet, so you didn't want to go too far and say too much about that world."[151]
  • Captain America's uniform (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name) is the costume worn by the bearers of the Captain America mantle whilst on missions.
    • The first uniform, worn by Steve Rogers, is a cloth USO costume based on his original costume from the comics, along with a heater shield. Upon hearing that Bucky Barnes' unit was MIA, he alters his USO uniform for the rescue mission, wearing a combat jacket and pants over the costume and donning a blue helmet from a USO chorus girl. Howard Stark later designs a combat uniform made of carbon polymer, with leather pouches and a holster, a wingless mask, and a round vibranium shield. After being unfrozen, he uses a costume designed by S.H.I.E.L.D. which resembles his USO uniform. During his time with S.T.R.I.K.E., he uses a new uniform designed for stealth missions which has a darker shade of blue. He later returns to a variant of his World War II costume, taken from a display at the Captain America Exhibit at the Smithsonian. Tony Stark later creates a new uniform for Rogers, which incorporates magnetic gauntlets, allowing him to recall his shield. A slightly different version of this suit is used during the Avengers Civil War. During his exile, the suit is altered to remove the star and the Avengers logo. He is equipped with Wakandan shields on his arms before the Battle of Wakanda. After the Avengers reunite, he uses another new uniform.
    • When John Walker is handed the Captain America mantle, he uses an entirely new design, based on that from the comics: the uniform is blue, with red highlights and chest stripes, and includes red fingerless gloves. In place of the Avengers logo, it has the flag of the United States on the arms, and a stylized star on the mask and chest. He also carries a handgun and a version of Captain America's shield given by Steve Rogers to Sam Wilson. After he is stripped of the title, he builds a new shield, and dyes his uniform black, becoming the "U.S. Agent".
    • Sam Wilson dons a new version of the uniform as the new Captain America, incorporating his new vibranium wings.[152] This version, a gift from Wakanda, sticks closely to the version that he wears in the comics, with the main color being white. The star design spreads across the whole chest, and resembles the logo of the U.S. Air Force. The white mask incorporates Wilson's red goggles and stretches from the shoulders to just above his ears.
The Maasai people of Kenya (top) inspired about 80% of the design of the Dora Milaje, Wakanda's all-female special forces (bottom).[153]
  • The Dora Milaje uniform is the uniform worn by the Dora Milaje of Wakanda. It is made up of a body suit, harness, vibranium shoulder armor, neck rings, knee-high boots, and a waist cape. Silver rings are worn on the neck and arms (with the exception of Okoye, whose rings are gold to denote her status as general). The design of the uniform was partially inspired by tribal Filipino costume, as well as African influences.[154] Black Panther costume designer Ruth E. Carter wanted to avoid the "girls in the bathing suits" look, and instead had the Dora Milaje wear full armor that they would practically need for battle.[155] Anthony Francisco, the Senior Visual Development Illustrator, noted the Dora Milaje costumes were based 80 percent on the Maasai people, five percent on samurai, five percent on ninjas, and five percent on the Ifugao people from the Philippines.[153]
  • The EXO-7 Falcon is an winged harness created by the U.S. military for the Air National Guard. It was used by former paratroopers Sam Wilson and Riley, the latter of whom was killed during a mission. Sam then left active duty and joined the Avengers after assisting Steve Rogers and Natasha Romanoff during the Hydra Uprising. The suit features retractable wings and a pair of collapsible Steyr SPP submachine guns. Tony Stark later creates a new set of bulletproof retractable wings, featuring a drone as well as missiles and a wrist-mounted submachine gun. During a battle with John Walker, the suit is severely damaged beyond repair, and Sam leaves it with Joaquin Torres.
  • Iron Man's armor (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name) is a set of armored suits created by Tony Stark to combat threats. Most follow the same red and gold color scheme and contain similar functions. Stark would eventually create up to 85 armors, 34 of which are part of the original "Iron Legion". Many of his early suits were highly mobile and versatile, with the ability to be transformed or stored in various objects including a suitcase (Mark V), a cylindrical pod (Mark VII), and detachable parts (Mark XLII). Eventually, beginning with the Mark L armor, Stark is able to store his armor in the form of nanobots in his Arc Reactor which could flow over his body, assembling based on cybernetic commands, allowing Stark to create endless combinations and new weapons to manifest out of the armor.
    • The Hulkbuster armor (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name) is a modular add-on to Tony Stark's regular armor. Developed by Stark and Bruce Banner, its purpose is to restrain the Hulk and minimize the damage caused by him. The first-generation armor (the Iron Man Mark XLIV armor) was remotely controlled by a mobile service module named Veronica (named after the Archie Comics character Veronica Lodge)[156] and was used to restrain the Hulk following a rampage by him in Johannesburg, South Africa. In 2018, Banner is seen wearing an upgraded version of the armor (the Iron Man Mark XLVIII armor), which he utilizes during the Battle of Wakanda and the killing of Thanos.
    • The Hydra Stomper armor is a suit of armor built by Howard Stark for Steve Rogers during World War II as the Hydra Stomper in an alternate reality in which Peggy Carter becomes Captain Carter.[157] Powered by the Tesseract, the writers of What If...? originally named it the "Hydra Smasher" before Kevin Feige suggested the name change.[158]
    • The Iron Legion is two separate sets of armor built by Tony Stark. The first is a set of specialized armors (the Mark VIII–XLI armors) built due to his insomnia for various situations that he might encounter, which he utilizes against A.I.M.. He eventually destroys them due to the friction they cause between him and Pepper. The second set is a series of drones built by Stark to aid the Avengers, which are later taken control by Ultron and destroyed in battle with the Avengers.
    • The Iron Monger armor (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name) is an armored suit similar to the Iron Man armor. After Obadiah Stane gains Stark's salvaged Mark I armor from the Ten Rings, he reverse engineers it to create an even more powerful suit with added weapons, such as a minigun on the right arm. The suit is powered by Stark's personal Arc Reactor, forcing Stark to use a replacement to power his own suit, although he manages to defeat Stane.
    • The Iron Spider armor (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name), also known as Item 17A, is an armored nanotech suit created by Tony Stark for Peter Parker's use as an Avenger. The suit features four mechanical legs that can be unfolded from the back of the suit, allowing enhanced mobility and climbing skills, as well as web-shooters. Following his fight with the Vulture, Stark offers Parker the suit and membership to the Avengers, but Parker declines both. Two years later, Stark uses it to rescue Parker after he falls from Ebony Maw's Q-Ship, and Parker uses it during the Battle of Titan, the Battle of Earth, and a local charity event. For the suit's first appearance at the end of Spider-Man: Homecoming, Framestore created models and textures in anticipation for future MCU projects, while Trixter created the "clean, high tech" vault that the suit appears in.[7]
    • The Rescue armor[1] (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name), also known as the Iron Man Mark XLIX armor,[159] is an armored nanotech suit created by Tony Stark for his wife, Pepper Potts. It features a blue and silver color scheme, and many of the same abilities as Iron Man's armor. Potts uses it in the Battle of Earth against Thanos and his forces.[160]
    • The War Machine armor (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name) is a powered suit of armor originally developed by Tony Stark as the Iron Man Mark II armor before it is confiscated by James Rhodes and enhanced by Justin Hammer with machine guns in the wrists, a minigun on the right shoulder and a grenade launcher on the left, weapons which later proved to be ineffective. Stark later removes the modifications and rebuilds the suit himself using his own superior technology. This upgraded suit is briefly given a red, white, and blue color scheme and renamed the Iron Patriot by the U.S. government. It is later changed back to the gray color scheme and upgraded again, but accidentally disabled by the Vision mid-flight during the Avengers Civil War, causing Rhodes to crash and become paralyzed. For the Battle of Earth, Rhodes dons a new suit reminiscent of the original Iron Patriot armor, featuring multiple advanced weapons such as rocket launchers.
  • The Spider-Man suit (based on the Marvel Comics suit of the same name) is a suit worn by Peter Parker whilst fighting crime as the vigilante known as Spider-Man. His first suit, a simple homemade costume, consisted of a red hoodie, blue pants, a blue shirt, a red mask with black goggles, and homemade Web-shooters. After Tony Stark recruits him during the Avengers Civil War, he is given a new, more advanced suit, featuring a more modern and streamlined design, a built-in AI, improved goggles, a remote drone, a holographic interface, a parachute, a tracking device, a heater, an airbag, and more advanced Web-shooters.[161] Joe Russo described this suit as "a slightly more traditional, Steve Ditko influenced suit",[162] while Spider-Man: Homecoming co-producer Eric Hauserman Carroll noted that Marvel intentionally included many "fun and wacky" features from the comics in the suit.[161] He ceases to use this suit during the Infinity War, instead using the Iron Spider armor, which offers more protection and abilities. In an effort to conceal Spider-Man's identity, Talos (disguised as Nick Fury) has a seamstress make Peter a new stealth suit in Europe, later dubbed the "Night Monkey" suit by Ned Leeds. This version is entirely black in color, with the hood consisting of a black mask and flip-up goggles. After the suit is stolen by a prison warden, Peter builds himself a new one using the late Stark's technology, which he utilizes during his battle against Mysterio in London. Trixter provided visual effects for the Stark suit and the spider drone in Spider-Man: Homecoming, and also applied a rigging, muscle and cloth system to Sony Pictures Imageworks' homemade suit to "mimic the appearance of the rather loose training suit".[7]
  • Thanos' armor is a suit of armor worn by Thanos during his time as a warlord. It comprises of a helmet, breastplate, greaves, cuisses, gauntlets, and metal boots. He discards the armor following his attack on the Statesman, and uses it as a scarecrow after he completes his mission and retires to the Garden. An alternate version of Thanos from 2014 wears the armor during the Battle of Earth, during which the armor is heavily damaged by Wanda Maximoff. The armor is eventually destroyed by Tony Stark. In an alternate reality explored in the ninth episode of What If...?, Gamora kills Thanos before seizing his armor and blade.[163]
  • The Time Suits,[164][better source needed] also known as the Advanced Tech Suits[165] or Quantum Suits,[166] are a variation of the Ant-Man suit, allowing the Avengers to shrink down to microscopic size and travel back in time through the Quantum Realm. They are used by the surviving Avengers and Guardians of the Galaxy—Tony Stark, Steve Rogers, Bruce Banner, Clint Barton, James Rhodes, Natasha Romanoff, Thor, Nebula, Rocket, and Scott Lang.

Weapons

  • Anulax Batteries are devices that serve as the primary source of power for the Sovereign. After Rocket steals a handful of the batteries, Ayesha orders her troops after the Guardians of the Galaxy. Rocket later uses the batteries to build a powerful bomb, which is planted in Ego's core and kills him.
  • Black Widow's batons are a pair of electroshock weapons created by Tony Stark for Natasha Romanoff's use. They are stored and charged in her Widow's Bite, and are regarded as an extension of this weapon. When in use, they glow with a blue light, and deliver a powerful electric shock when struck against someone.
  • Bucky Barnes' prosthetic arm (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a metal prosthesis worn on the left arm by Bucky Barnes. The original arm is created by Hydra after Barnes falls off a train during World War II, and contains a red star on the shoulder. This version is later destroyed by Tony Stark during the Avengers Civil War, and Shuri later creates a new vibranium arm for him. This version also contains a fail-safe that can be used to remove it, which is utilized by Ayo in 2024. Visual effects for the arm were completed by Luma Pictures in Captain America: Civil War.[167]
The shield, as depicted in the MCU, being held by Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan, who portray Sam Wilson and Bucky Barnes respectively, at the 2019 San Diego Comic-Con.
  • Captain America's shield (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a weapon made of vibranium used by the bearers of the Captain America mantle, including Steve Rogers, John Walker, and Sam Wilson. It is created by Howard Stark and given to Rogers during World War II. After Rogers' retirement, the shield is given by Wilson to the Smithsonian, but the government passes it to John Walker, who uses it to murder a Flag Smasher. After he is stripped away of his title as Captain America, John Walker creates a new homemade shield from scrap metal and his Medal of Honor, which he later abandons in New York City.[168] The shield is seen as a symbol of Captain America's strength and legacy.[169] A replica of the shield also appears in Iron Man and Iron Man 2, which director Jon Favreau included because he felt it was important to include inside references for fans of the comics.[170]
  • The Cosmi-Rod is a war-hammer owned by the Kree fanatic Ronan, who uses it to fire concussive blasts at enemies. In 2014, Ronan equips the hammer with the Power Stone and plans to use it to destroy Xandar. However, Drax uses the Hadron Enforcer to destroy the Cosmi-Rod, allowing Peter Quill to grab the Power Stone and use it to kill Ronan.
  • The Destroyer (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is an automaton used by Odin to stop threats such as the Frost Giants.[171] Loki later uses it to attack Thor on Earth before Thor regains his powers and kills the Destroyer.[172][173] Later, parts of it were reassembled by S.H.I.E.L.D. agents into a prototype gun which was later used by Phil Coulson in the film The Avengers and the ABC series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D..[174]
  • A Dragonfang (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a powerful sword with a steel blade and a hilt carved from a dragon's tooth. They are used by the Valkyrie in battle, although Scrapper 142 is the sole survivor of the group and thus retains the only Dragonfang left.
  • Extremis (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a form of genetic manipulation developed by Maya Hansen. It gives a person an advanced healing factor, meaning that they are able to regenerate from physical damage, deformities and psychological damage. Subjects also have the ability to control their body heat and generate fire. Aldrich Killian uses it to heal his weak physique and cure injured war veterans such as Ellen Brandt.
  • The Godslayer is a powerful sword used by Gamora. It has an energy core in the hilt, lowering the weight and making it easier to wield. The long blade is collapsible and includes a detachable knife that connects to the sword's hilt.
  • Gungnir (based on the Norse mythological object of the same name) was Odin's spear, capable of channelling the Odinforce. It has also been used by Loki and Thor. The spear was presumably destroyed during Ragnarök.
  • The Hammer Drones were remotely-controlled humanoid drones designed by Ivan Vanko and commissioned by Justin Hammer following his previous failed attempts to recreate the Iron Man armor. They were designed for use by various branches of the military, with Hammer hoping that they would replace Iron Man. However, Vanko secretly takes control of the drones and used them to wreak havoc at the Stark Expo, though they are ultimately defeated by Tony Stark and James Rhodes and destroyed by Vanko.
  • Hawkeye's bow and quiver are a pair of tools used by Clint Barton that serve as his primary weapons. The bow is a collapsible recurve bow, whilst the quiver is mechanized, able to store and deploy his signature trick arrows. After the Blip, he swaps his bow for a katana which he uses to murder criminals such as the Japanese Yakuza.
  • Hofund (based on the Norse mythological object of the same name), also known as the Bifröst Sword, is a magical sword used by Heimdall (and, during his exile, Skurge) that is able to channel the Bifröst. It also served as the key to activate the Bifröst. It is last used by Heimdall to transport the Hulk to Earth before he is killed by Thanos, and was presumably destroyed along with the Statesman.
A model of the Infinity Gauntlet at the 2018 Atlanta Comic-Con
  • The Infinity Gauntlet (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a left-handed metal gauntlet owned by Thanos and forged from uru by Eitri and the Dwarves of Nidavellir. It is capable of harnessing the power of all six Infinity Stones at once, thus making the wearer able to do anything in their imagination. A replica of the Gauntlet is also kept by Odin in his vault on Asgard, which originally appeared in Thor as an Easter egg before Marvel Studios realized that it could not be the actual one and formulated an internal theory that the gauntlet was a fake, which led to a scene in Thor: Ragnarok where Hela declares it fake.[175]
  • The Jericho is an experimental guided missile developed by Stark Industries for the United States Armed Forces that can separate into 16 smaller missiles when launched. At a demonstration for the weapon in Afghanistan, Tony Stark's convoy is ambushed, and he is captured by the Ten Rings, who forces him to build the missile for them. However, Stark secretly builds the first Iron Man armor and escapes.
  • Loki's scepter, also known as the Chitauri Scepter[2] or simply as the Scepter, is a bladed weapon with an extendable handle given as a gift to Loki by Thanos. It has a blue gem at the top containing the Mind Stone, allowing Loki to brainwash and mind control others by touching them with it. After the Battle of New York, it is taken by Hydra agents disguised as S.T.R.I.K.E. team agents and used by Strucker and Dr. List to unlock and amplify Wanda and Pietro Maximoff's abilities. It is later recaptured by the Avengers and used by Tony Stark and Bruce Banner to create Ultron. Ultron then uses it to brainwash Helen Cho, who in turn creates the Vision, with the gem becoming embedded in his forehead. During the Time Heist, Steve Rogers uses his knowledge of the future to gain the Scepter from the S.T.R.I.K.E. team before using it to brainwash an alternate version of himself.
Mjölnir, as depicted in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, being held by Natalie Portman, who portrays Jane Foster, at the 2019 San Diego Comic-Con
  • Mjölnir (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is an enchanted hammer owned by Thor (and previously, Hela) and made of uru by the Dwarves of Nidavellir that is capable of controlling lightning and allows the user to fly if it is spun rapidly and released with enough power. Before Thor is banished to Earth, Odin enchants the hammer so that only those deemed "worthy" would be able to wield it and be granted the power of Thor, which include the Vision and Steve Rogers. An alternate version of the hammer is acquired by Thor during the Time Heist, and is later returned to its original timeline by Rogers.
  • The Nano Gauntlet,[176] also known as the Iron Gauntlet[177] or the Power Gauntlet,[178] is a right-handed metal gauntlet created by Tony Stark, Bruce Banner, and Rocket using Stark nanotechnology. It was designed to harness the power of the Infinity Stones akin to the Infinity Gauntlet and created to reverse the Blip. After the Avengers retrieve alternate versions of the six Infinity Stones during the Time Heist, Smart Hulk uses it to snap his fingers and resurrect the lives of half the Universe before an alternate version of Thanos from 2014 arrives and attempts to acquire the Gauntlet for himself. During the subsequent Battle of Earth, the gauntlet is passed around multiple individuals before ending up in the hands of Thanos, but the Stones are secretly removed by Tony Stark, who snaps his fingers and disintegrates Thanos and his army.
  • A Nano mask[179] is a device used by S.H.I.E.L.D. agents to impersonate others. Designed by a Berkeley University graduate named Selwyn, the mask is capable of imitating one's appearance and voice in order to create a disguise. It has been used by Natasha Romanoff, Sunil Bakshi, Kara Palamas, Melina Vostokoff, and Sharon Carter.[180]
  • Necroswords (based on the Nightsword and All-Black the Necrosword from the Marvel Comics) were a series of obsidian swords generated and used by Hela at will. She uses the swords, which can take any form, to slaughter the Valkyrie, the Warriors Three, and the Einherjar; as well as against Thor, Loki, Valkyrie, Skurge, and Surtur.
  • The Quad Blasters are Peter Quill's primary weapons. The blasters have two separate triggers controlling two separate barrels, which are fired using the index and middle finger. The bottom barrel of each gun fires non-lethal electric shots, while the top barrel fires lethal plasma shots. Prop master Russell Bobbitt created two sets of the blasters for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, which contained removable blaster cartridges.[181]
  • Reset charges are contraptions used by the Time Variance Authority (TVA) to "prune" alternate timelines, erasing them from existence in order to preserve the Sacred Timeline. Michael Waldron, the head writer of Loki, said the charges use magic "or perhaps something a bit more technical", and that the audience is "kind of in the dark with what is exactly is going on with these reset charges".[182] They are later used by Sylvie to "bomb" the Sacred Timeline.[183][184][185]
  • The Shocker's gauntlet is a mechanical weapon originally owned by Brock Rumlow and ripped off by Steve Rogers in Lagos. The gauntlet is then recovered by the Department of Damage Control and stolen by Adrian Toomes. Phineas Mason modifies the gauntlet before passing it to Jackson Brice, who uses the gauntlet while calling himself the "Shocker". After Brice is disintegrated, it is used by Herman Schultz until his defeat at the hands of Spider-Man. Visual effects for the gauntlet were provided by Trixter in Spider-Man: Homecoming.[7]
  • Shuri's gauntlets are a pair of vibranium gauntlets designed and used by Shuri. Shaped like a panther's head, they emit a powerful sonic blast capable of subduing a Black Panther. They are ultimately destroyed by Killmonger. After Killmonger's demise at the hands of her brother, T'Challa, Shuri designs a second pair which she uses during the Battles of Wakanda and Earth.
  • Stormbreaker (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a large battle axe made of uru and created by the dwarf king Eitri. The weapon, meant to be the most powerful in the Asgardian king's arsenal, has powers similar to Mjölnir and is also capable of summoning the Bifröst. Thor takes ownership of it and uses it to defeat the Outriders in Wakanda, attack Thanos, kill him on the Garden, and during the Battle of Earth.[186]
  • Taskmaster's equipment is an armored suit and panoply utilised by Antonia Dreykov. It includes a shield, a sword, a bow and arrow, and retractable claws within her gloves, allowing her to perfectly mimic various individuals.
  • The Ten Rings (based on the Mandarin's rings from the Marvel Comics) are a set of ten mystical iron rings used by Wenwu and Shang-Chi,[187] which provide the namesake and emblem for the criminal organization of the same name.[188] The Rings grant their user enhanced strength and longevity, emit concussive energy blasts, and can be telepathically controlled as projectiles and tendrils.[187] The appearance of the aura projected by the rings varies on the user, with Wenwu's resembling violent blue lightning and Shang-Chi's resembling graceful orange flames in order to reflect their distinct personalities.[189][124] According to Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings producer Jonathan Schwartz, the Rings were changed from being worn on the fingers as rings as in the comics to being worn on the wrists was due to its impracticality and similarity with the Infinity Stones.[190] Director Destin Daniel Cretton also noted that more material regarding the Rings were created but purposely withheld so that they can be explored in future projects,[191] while the film's mid-credits scene was written in order to leave the Rings' origins ambiguous so that they can be explored in the future.[192] Visual effects for the Rings were provided by Weta Digital in Shang-Chi, which originally gave the Rings different colors for every functionality.[193]
  • Thanos' blade[1] is a large double-sided sword used by an alternate version of Thanos from 2014 during the Battle of Earth. Thanos uses it to break Captain America's shield as well as Luis' van before it is destroyed by Wanda Maximoff using her telekinetic powers. The blade's design was based on a helicopter used by Thanos in the comics,[194] an easter egg which Thanos creator Jim Starlin criticized.[195][196] In an alternate reality explored in the ninth episode of What If...?, Gamora kills Thanos before seizing his armor and blade.[163]
  • Time Sticks[197] are batons used by Minutemen of the Time Variance Authority (TVA) to "prune" variants. Ravonna Renslayer, a former Hunter for the TVA, also wields a baton, which she uses against Loki and Sylvie. When designing the pruning effect for Loki, visual effects vendor FuseFX sought to differentiate it from the Blip, taking inspiration from the documentary series Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey.[198]
  • The Ultron Sentries, also known as the Sub-Ultrons, were a large army of robots that acted as extensions of Ultron. They were created by Ultron using resources from the Hydra Research Base in Sokovia and were directly controlled by him, thus acting as his personal army. They were ultimately destroyed by the Avengers during the Battle of Sokovia.
  • Ulysses Klaue's prosthetic arm is a prosthetic arm used by Ulysses Klaue after his arm was chopped off by Ultron. Actually a modified Wakandan tool used for mining vibranium, it functioned as a sonic cannon, capable of shooting out high-energy blasts powerful enough to destroy a car and temporarily subdue a Black Panther. The sonic cannon could be retracted and hidden inside the prosthesis when not in use. It was later destroyed by T'Challa during a skirmish in Busan, Korea.
  • The Web-shooters (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) are a pair of electromechanical gauntlets developed by Peter Parker for his use as the crime-fighter known as Spider-Man. They are capable of shooting synthetic webbing stored in small cartridges on the gauntlets. The first version of the Web-shooters, which were homemade by Parker, are upgraded by Tony Stark before the Avengers Civil War. This version has a variety of different settings, including "spinning web", "web ball", and "ricochet web", a capability first teased in the mid-credits scene of Captain America: Civil War. This was compared by Spider-Man: Homecoming co-producer Eric Hauserman Carroll to a DSLR camera.[38] Visual effects for the synthetic webbing were provided by Digital Domain and Sony Pictures Imageworks in Spider-Man: Homecoming, who based the design on polar bear hair due to its translucent nature as well as its design in Civil War and previous Spider-Man films.[199] The Iron Spider armor also features its own Web-shooters, which are more streamlined and technologically-advanced. After Stark's death, Peter uses his technology to craft himself a new pair after his old ones are destroyed.
  • The Widow's Bite (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is an electroshock weapon used by Natasha Romanoff in combat. Created by S.H.I.E.L.D., it delivers powerful electrical discharges from two gauntlets worn on the wrists. Tony Stark later creates a more powerful version for her, which causes the piping in her suit to light up and glow. It has been used by Romanoff to momentarily disable the Winter Soldier's metal arm and the Black Panther suit, as well as to attack other Black Widows in the Red Room.
  • The Yaka arrow (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a sound-sensitive arrow owned by Yondu Udonta. Made of Yaka metal by the Centaurians, it is controlled by a red fin worn on Yondu's head combined with his whistling, and is carried in a holster on his belt when not in use. His use of the arrow is extremely skilled, allowing him to accurately control its direction and speed, killing multiple aliens within seconds. After Yondu's death, Kraglin acquires the arrow and a new cybernetic head fin, but struggles to control his arrow due to his lack of experience.
  • The Zodiac (based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name) is a deadly blue-colored liquid contained in a vial. Following World War II, Peggy Carter singlehandedly retrieves it after numerous failed attempts by the SSR, leading Howard Stark to appoint her head of S.H.I.E.L.D. the next day.

Artifacts

  • The Book of Cagliostro is an ancient spellbook housed in the Ancient One's private library in Kamar-Taj. The book focuses on dark magic, causing many students who studied the book to lose their way. Kaecilius tears pages out of the book in order to allow him to perform a ritual to contact Dormammu and draw energy from the Dark Dimension, extending his life forever. Stephen Strange also studies the book, learning how to use the Eye of Agamotto.
  • The Casket of Ancient Winters (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a relic owned and used by the Frost Giants. When opened, it projects an icy wind that freezes everything in its path, and is capable of plunging an entire planet into a new ice age. The Casket is captured in 965 AD by the Asgardians, who stored in Odin's vault. Over a millennium later, Frost Giants attack Asgard, seeking to reclaim the Casket, but are once again defeated. It is presumably destroyed during Ragnarök.
  • The Cloak of Levitation (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a magical relic that is enables its user to levitate in the air. One of the many relics owned by the Masters of the Mystic Arts are originally stored in the New York Sanctum, it "chooses" Stephen Strange as its master during a fight with Kaecilius. It has a consciousness of its own and is able to move independently and defend Strange against threats. It is later used by Strange during the Battle of Titan and the Battle of Earth. Visual effects for the artifact were provided by Framestore in Doctor Strange.[109]
  • The Crimson Bands of Cyttorak (based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name) is a magical wooden relic housed in the New York Sanctum. When thrown at an opponent, it restrains them, binding their hands behind their back, which Stephen Strange uses it on Kaecilius. A second, more comics-accurate version is manifested during Strange's fight with Thanos, a spell that appears as red bands. Visual effects for the original version were provided by Framestore in Doctor Strange.[109]
  • The Darkhold (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name), also known as the Book of the Damned, is a magical grimoire previously owned by Agatha Harkness, who uses it to determine that Wanda Maximoff is the Scarlet Witch. After defeating Harkness, Maximoff takes the book to study whilst in hiding. Made out of dark matter from the Dark Dimension, it constantly burns with magical fire. A visually distinct iteration of the book appears in the ABC series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and the Hulu series Runaways, in which it was used by Holden Radcliffe, AIDA, Robbie Reyes, and Morgan le Fay.
  • The Eternal Flame is an unextinguishable mystical flame which serves as the source of Surtur's full power. At one point in time, Odin steals the Flame from Muspelheim and stores it in his vault, but it is later used by Hela to resurrect Fenris and her army. After Thor returns from Sakaar, he sends Loki to place Surtur's crown in the Flame, resurrecting him and initiating Ragnarök.
  • Sling Rings are small two-ring mystical artifacts used by the Masters of the Mystic Arts to teleport between different locations via an interdimensional portal.[200]
  • Surtur's crown is the source of Surtur's power. Thor destroys Surtur by taking the crown and storing it in Odin's vault, although he later sends Loki to unite it with the Eternal Flame, resurrecting Surtur and initiating Ragnarök.

Infinity Stones

  • The Space Stone, originally housed in the Tesseract (based on the Cosmic Cube from the Marvel Comics), was the Infinity Stone that controlled the aspect of space. It grants the user the ability to open wormholes and to travel between places instantaneously, and has been utilized by Johann Schmidt, Loki, and Thanos. The energy generated by the Stone is also used by the Asgardians to repair the Bifröst Bridge, Hydra and S.H.I.E.L.D. to power weapons, and Project Pegasus to develop light-speed engines.
  • The Mind Stone, originally housed in Loki's scepter and later on Vision's forehead, was the Infinity Stone that controlled the aspect of the mind. It grants the user the ability to control minds and give sentience to beings, as well as to project energy blasts. In 2015, Tony Stark and Bruce Banner use it to create Ultron, who later fuses the Stone on the Vision. Exposure to the Mind Stone also granted Pietro Maximoff superhuman speed and amplified Wanda's innate magical abilities. Her connection to the Stone also allows her to create a simulacrum of Vision and two sons, Billy and Tommy.
  • The Reality Stone, originally in the form of the Aether (based on the classical element of the same name), was the Infinity Stone that controlled the aspect of reality. It first appears in a fluid-like state, and grants the user the ability to change reality, create illusions, suck the life force out of mortals, disrupt the laws of physics, and repel any threats that it detects.
  • The Power Stone, originally housed in the Orb and later in Ronan's Cosmi-Rod, was the Infinity Stone that controlled the aspect of power. It grants the user superhuman strength and durability, and is capable of overpowering Carol Danvers.
  • The Time Stone, originally housed in the Eye of Agamotto (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name), was the Infinity Stone that controlled the aspect of time. It grants the user the ability to manipulate time and forsee possible futures. It has been used by Stephen Strange, the Ancient One, and Thanos.
  • The Soul Stone, originally located on the planet Vormir, was the Infinity Stone that controlled the aspect of the soul. It grants the user the ability to manipulate living souls, and also contains a pocket dimension called the Soul World. Uniquely, it has a guard over its location, the Stonekeeper, who guides those through the ritual required to gain it: "a soul for a soul", via a sacrifice.

Creatures

Trixter looked at wombats for inspiration when designing the appearance of Morris.[124]
  • Morris (voiced by Dee Baker)[216] is a six-legged, faceless hundun who befriends Trevor Slattery during his imprisonment by the Ten Rings.[217] Morris later escapes with Slattery, Shang-Chi, Katy, and Xialing and leads them to his home, Ta Lo. The creature was inspired by Shang-Chi director Destin Daniel Cretton's 15-year-old dachshund of the same name, and was doubled by a green-screen cushion during filming; the creatives of the film found it difficult to make Morris cute due to it not having eyes or a face to convey emotion, leading them to rely on its fur, feathers, and voice.[218][124] Visual effects for the creature were provided by Trixter in Shang-Chi, who looked at wombats and puppies for inspiration.[124][189]
  • Señor Scratchy (based on Ebony and Nicholas Scratch from the Marvel Comics) is Agatha Harkness' rabbit who also acts as her familiar.
  • Sparky (based on the Marvel Comics creature of the same name) is a dog owned by Wanda Maximoff's family within the fictional WandaVision sitcom. It is later murdered by Agatha Harkness.

Magic

Artificial Intelligences

Elements

Projects and protocols

  • The Avengers Initiative, originally known as the Protector Initiative, is the initiative for gathering a group of superheroes from various backgrounds, described as "a group of remarkable people", into the Avengers, in order to protect Earth from various threats. It was initiated by Nick Fury in the 1990s and was renamed in honor of Carol Danvers' call sign, "Avenger". In 2011, Fury directs Natasha Romanoff to measure Tony Stark's suitability for the initiative, though Stark was initially rejected and only used as a consultant. Fury also recruits Steve Rogers, Bruce Banner, and Thor, and also assigns S.H.I.E.L.D. agents Natasha Romanoff and Clint Barton to the team.
  • Cataract is a project conducted by S.W.O.R.D. with the goal of reactivating the Vision as a "sentient weapon" following his death at the hands of Thanos during the Infinity War. Under Acting Director Tyler Hayward's orders, S.W.O.R.D. acquires the Vision's body following the Battle of Wakanda and dismantles it, hoping to study its components and rebuild it. Though initially unsuccessful, S.W.O.R.D. uses energy collected from Wanda Maximoff on a Stark Industries drone to reactivate the Vision, turning his body white in the process.
  • The House Party Protocol is a command given by Tony Stark to J.A.R.V.I.S. to activate and control his entire armory for air support for James Rhodes as he rescued the U.S. President from Aldrich Killian. Stark activates the protocol after J.A.R.V.I.S. informs him that the armory's underground entrance had been cleared, allowing the suits to be released.
  • Project Insight is a secret S.H.I.E.L.D. operation that was began as a direct response to the Battle of New York. It involved three advanced Helicarriers that would patrol Earth, using an algorithm to evaluated people's behavior to detect possible future threats and using satellite-guided guns to eliminate those individuals. The project was led by Alexander Pierce, who intended to use the project as a means of eliminating individuals who posed a threat to Hydra. His plans were eventually foiled by Steve Rogers and his allies. Captain America: The Winter Soldier directors Anthony and Joe Russo sought to include references to drone warfare, targeted killing and global surveillance in the film, which became more topical during principal photography due to the disclosure of several National Security Agency surveillance-related documents.[249]
  • Project Pegasus (based on the Marvel Comics project of the same name) is a joint project between S.H.I.E.L.D., NASA, and the United States Air Force to study the Tesseract.[250] It is reactivated by the World Security Council following an alien attack in Puente Antiguo, New Mexico until it is terminated after Thor takes the Tesseract back to Asgard after the Battle of New York.
  • Project Rebirth (based on Weapon I from the Marvel Comics), also known as the Super Soldier Program, is a collaboration between U.S., British and German scientists led by Dr. Abraham Erskine under the supervision of Peggy Carter, Howard Stark, and Chester Phillips to create a new breed of super-soldiers. The first successful test leads to the creation of Captain America by enhancing the sickly Steve Rogers, but is abandoned following the assassination of Erskine by Heinz Kruger.
  • The Red Room (based on the Marvel Comics program of the same name), also known as the Black Widow Program, is a top-secret Soviet (and later Russian) training program led by Dreykov. The program takes young orphan girls and turns them into elite assassins named "Black Widows", and is overseen by various individuals, including Madame B. and Melina Vostokoff. Graduates of the program include Natasha Romanoff and Yelena Belova. It was terminated in 2016 following the destruction of the Red Room's headquarters.
  • The Sokovia Accords (based on the Registration Acts from the Marvel Comics), officially titled the Sokovia Accords: Framework For the Registration and Deployment of Enhanced Individuals,[251] are a group of legislative documents ratified by the United Nations (UN), with the support of 117 countries, following the Battle of Sokovia. They establish UN oversight over the Avengers, and were supported by Tony Stark, James Rhodes, the Vision, T'Challa, and Natasha Romanoff and opposed by Steve Rogers, Sam Wilson, and Clint Barton, leading to the Avengers Civil War.
  • The Training Wheels Protocol is a limitation installed by Tony Stark on the Spider-Man suit in order to prevent Peter Parker from gaining access to its more dangerous features. Parker eventually disables the protocol with the help of his friend Ned Leeds.[161]
  • The Ultron Program is an attempt by Tony Stark and Bruce Banner to create an artificial intelligence, "Ultron", as a means of protecting the world against incoming extraterrestrial threats. The program becomes a failure, with the program becoming sentient due to the Mind Stone and turning genocidal, seeking to wipe out the human race.
  • The Winter Soldier Program is a top secret Hydra program started by Nazi scientist Dr. Arnim Zola in the 1940s. It took soldiers, brainwashed them, and enhanced them with a recreation of the Super Soldier Serum, turning them into a deadly assassins known as "Winter Soldiers", who were kept in cyrostasis whilst not on a mission. Each soldier had a set of codewords, recorded in the Winter Soldier Book, which, when recited to a Winter Soldier, would make them completely obedient to that person. The Winter Soldiers, with the exception of Bucky Barnes, were later executed by Helmut Zemo.

Substances

  • The Black Widow antidote is a red-colored synthetic gas stored in vials which acts as the antidote to the chemical mind-control that the Red Room employs on its Black Widows and Taskmaster, created by a rogue former Black Widow. Yelena Belova and Natasha Romanoff acquire the antidote in 2016 and use it to free various Widows.
  • The Embers of Genesis are "nutrient-rich cosmic dust" orignating from an ancient supernova.[252] Due to its immense power capable of terraforming planets, it is heavily sought by Star-Lord T'Challa and the Collector in an alternate reality.[253]
  • The Heart-shaped herb is a Wakandan plant enriched through exposure to vibranium, giving it a glowing purple color. It is ingested in a ceremony by the new Black Panther, granting them superhuman abilities. It also allows for the communication with the dead in the Ancestral Plane upon ingestion. After becoming King of Wakanda, N'Jadaka ingests the herb and orders the rest of the stocks to be incinerated. One of them is extracted by Nakia, who uses it to heal T'Challa.
  • Pym Particles (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) are extradimensional subatomic particles capable of reducing or increasing the gaps between atoms, allowing the user to shrink or grow. They appear in the form of a liquid stored in vials. They appear red when used to shrink and blue when used to grow. The particles also power Pym Discs and the Wasp's blasters, and are used by the Avengers to time-travel via the Quantum Realm during the Time Heist.
  • The Super Soldier Serum (based on the Marvel Comics object of the same name) is a serum used to enhance humans to the peak of human perfection. It was originally developed by Dr. Abraham Erskine and was given to Johann Schmidt (turning him into the Red Skull) and Steve Rogers (turning him into Captain America). After Erksine's death, numerous other versions of the serum are created with varying degrees of success. Hydra used a version of the serum to transform Bucky Barnes into the Winter Soldier, and later used variants of the serum taken from Howard Stark after his assassination to enhance other assassins as well, but the program fails and is shut down. Another serum was given to Isaiah Bradley by the U.S. government during the Cold War, allowing him to confront and defeat the Winter Soldier in combat. Bruce Banner tried to replicate the serum using gamma radiation as a substitute for vita radiation, turning him into the Hulk. Meanwhile, a more successful version of the serum was given to Emil Blonsky by the U.S. government, and Dr. Wilfred Nagel successfully replicated the serum and gave them to the Power Broker until they were stolen by Karli Morgenthau and the Flag Smashers. Helmut Zemo later destroys all but one of the vials, which is taken by John Walker.
  • Vita radiation is a type of electromagnetic radiation that has stabilizing properties. For this purpose, it was used to activate the properties of the Super Soldier Serum in Steve Rogers via a chamber in the form of Vita rays. Like the original serum's formula, the Vita ray formula was lost when Dr. Abraham Erskine is killed.

Technologies

  • The Arc Reactor is an energy source originally designed by Howard Stark and Anton Vanko, and later independently built by their sons, Tony and Ivan. It was initially designed as part of an attempt to replicate the Tesseract's energy based on Howard's study of the object. Tony Stark eventually builds two versions—a large industrial reactor for powering his machines at the Stark Industries Headquarters, and a miniature version embedded in his chest to power his armor (also known as an RT) and prevent the shrapnel from reaching his heart. The first miniature version used a palladium core, although he later synthesizes a new element when the palladium begins to poison him. He continues to develop the reactor throughout the years (even after the shrapnel is removed from his body), with the final version containing nanobots that make up his armor. Ivan Vanko, James Rhodes, and Pepper Potts also utilize Arc Reactors in their armors.
  • Binarily Augmented Retro-Framing, better known by its acronym B.A.R.F., is a holographic technology created by Quentin Beck during his time at Stark Industries. Despite the technology's potential, Stark used the technology for therapeutic purposes and gave it a deliberately humorous name, humiliating and disgusting Beck. After he is fired for his unstable nature, Beck further developed the technology and equipped drones with advanced holographic projectors to create large monsters known as Elementals.
  • Dum-E is Tony Stark's automated hydraulic arm. Built by a young Stark in his father Howard's garage, it acts as his workshop assistant, and often "hands" him things, such as bringing his Arc Reactor when Stark was unable to reach it due to having his previous one stolen by Obadiah Stane. However, Dum-E has also often been of annoyance to Stark.[254] Though severely damaged by Aldrich Killian's attack on his mansion, Dum-E was pulled out of the wreckage and hauled away by Stark.
  • Kimoyo Beads are an advanced piece of technology developed by Shuri and used in Wakanda. They are made to serve a vast range of purposes according to the needs of the wearer, such as deprogramming Bucky Barnes.
A Motorola LX2 pager
  • Nick Fury's pager is a pager belonging to Nick Fury that was upgraded by Carol Danvers before she left Earth. With the new enhancements, it could now contact her no matter where she was in the galaxy, although he was only to use it in the event of an emergency. Nick Fury activates it for the first time in years during the Blip, prompting Danvers to return to Earth and meet the surviving Avengers.
  • Peter Quill's Walkman is a Sony TPS-L2 Walkman given to Peter Quill by his mother, Meredith, when he was a child. It contained a cassette tape titled Awesome Mix Vol. 1 which included a series of songs from the 1960s and 1970s, incorporated by Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn as "cultural reference points" to remind audiences of Quill's Earthly origins.[255][256] Deeply cherished by Quill, he happened to have his Walkman on him when adbucted by Yondu, which he continued to listen to during his adult years. Following the Battle of Xandar, Quill opens a gift from his mother, which is revealed to be another mixtape titled Awesome Mix Vol. 2, described by Gunn as "better" and "more diverse" than Vol. 1.[257][258] After his Walkman is destroyed by Ego, Kraglin gives him a Zune formerly owned by Yondu as a replacement, a scene which Microsoft was displeased with.[259][260]
  • The Quantum Tunnel is an inter-dimensional gateway designed by Hank Pym, Bill Foster, and Elihas Starr to transport individuals to and from the Quantum Realm. Six versions of the tunnel have been created over time: the first incarnation was built by Pym, Foster, and Starr but was destroyed in an explosion; a second version of the tunnel was used by Pym and Hope van Dyne to rescue Janet van Dyne from the Quantum Realm; a third version was placed inside Luis' van and used to send Scott Lang into the Quantum Realm in order to acquire quantum energy to heal Ava Starr; a fourth tunnel was used by the Avengers to travel back in time in order to collect the six Infinity Stones in alternate timelines; a fifth was created shortly after the Battle of Earth by Bruce Banner to send Steve Rogers back in time in order to return the Infinity Stones and Mjölnir back to their respective timelines; and a sixth tunnel was used by Leo Fitz, Jemma Simmons, and Enoch to travel across different timelines.
The Northrop Grumman Bat, a typical weaponized reconnaissance drone.
  • Redwing (based on the Marvel Comics animal of the same name), officially designated the Stark Drone MK82 922 V 80Z V2 Prototype Unit V6,[261] is an advanced drone used in combat and reconnaissance by Sam Wilson. It was originally designed by Stark Industries after Wilson joins the Avengers, and was equipped into his EXO-7 Falcon suit. In 2023, Wilson acquires a new version of the drone along with a new combat suit, but the drone is destroyed by Karli Morgenthau. Wilson later uses a new version of the drone along with his uniform as Captain America, both designed in Wakanda.
  • The Regeneration Cradle is a piece of medical equipment created by Dr. Helen Cho that is able to heal serious injuries by grafting artificial tissue onto them. Clint Barton's life is successfully saved through this treatment. Ultron later brainwashes Dr. Cho using Loki's scepter into grafting the tissue to the Mind Stone and vibranium in order to create a new body for himself. The Avengers intervene, and with Thor's help, the new body is awoken and dubbed the "Vision".
  • TemPads are devices used by the Time Variance Authority (TVA) to travel through time. Their interface was inspired by SNES video games and Game Boys, with Loki director Kate Herron describing them as "the closest thing to our phones" that the TVA has.[262]
    • Time Doors are amber-colored interdimensional portals utilized by the Time Variance Authority (TVA) to travel between alternate timelines in order to preserve the Sacred Timeline, activated by TemPads. They can also lead to Time Cells, where prisoners are forever stuck in time loops and the Doors are colored red instead. FuseFX, which provided the portals' visual effects for the first season of Loki, explained that this color change was to reflect the amount of suffering which Loki undergoes when inside the Time Cells.[263]
  • The Time-Keepers (voiced by Jonathan Majors[264] and based on the Marvel Comics characters of the same name) were three androids created by He Who Remains to pose as the creators of the Time Variance Authority (TVA). Believed to be alive by workers of the TVA, statues of them and their likenesses are featured in several locations throughout the TVA's headquarters. Majors voicing both the Time-Keepers and their controller He Who Remains is a reference to The Wizard of Oz (1939).[264]
  • Tony Stark's glasses are a pair of technologically advanced sunglasses created by him. They are able to polarize and contain his AI F.R.I.D.A.Y.. After his death, F.R.I.D.A.Y. is replaced by E.D.I.T.H., passing into the hands of Peter Parker. Parker passes them on to Quentin Beck, who uses them to better control his illusions, before reacquiring them in London.
  • The Universal Neural Teleportation Network[265] is the universal system for space travel. The system enables spaceships to travel through hexagonal-shaped wormholes known as jump points in order to "jump" between planetary systems. According to Yondu, it is not healthy for a mammalian lifeform to go through more than fifty jumps at once, which will result in extreme discomfort and temporary disfigurement for those on board.

Others

Hubble photography inspired the visual effects of the Bifrost
  • The Bifröst Bridge (based on the Norse mythological location of the same name), often simply referred to as the Bifröst, is an energy that allows for near-instantaneous travel via a wormhole, used primarily for travel within the Nine Realms by Asgardians. The energy is harnessed using the Rainbow Bridge, which connected to Himinbjörg. Loki intends to use this to destroy Jotunheim, proving himself worthy of the throne to Odin, but his plans are foiled after Thor destroys the Rainbow Bridge. The Bridge is later repaired using the Tesseract, but destroyed again during Ragnarok. The energy can also be generated through dark magic and using Stormbreaker. Visual effects of the Bifröst in Thor were influenced by Hubble photography as well as other images of deep space,[101] and were done by BUF Compagnie and Fuel VFX.[266][267]
  • The Captain America PSAs were a series of public service announcements starring Captain America dressed in his 2012 suit.[268] The President's Fitness Challenge served as an inspiration for one of the videos centered on "Captain America's Fitness Challenge", with Spider-Man: Homecoming director Jon Watts believing that Captain America would be the obvious version of that in the MCU.[269] Another PSA discussed school detention and puberty, which became an internet meme following the release of Homecoming.[270][271] The second post-credits scene of that film features a third PSA video of Rogers lecturing the audience on the value of patience, a meta-reference to the fact that the film's audience had waited through the film's credits just to see that scene and a "last-minute addition" to the film.[272][273] Additionally, there were numerous PSAs that were cut from the final film.[274]
  • The Contest of Champions (based on the Marvel Comics storyline of the same name) is a gladiator tournament held on Sakaar by the Grandmaster. His tower displays models of the heads of past champions, which resemble Man-Thing, Ares, Bi-Beast, Dark-Crawler, Fin Fang Foom, and Beta Ray Bill from the comics in addition to the Hulk.[275][276] Other gladiators include Thor, Korg, and Miek. Loki lands on the planet as well but is able to ingratiate himself with the Grandmaster and watches the games from his private box. When designing the gladiator arena on Sakaar for Thor: Ragnarok, production designer Dan Hennah studied Roman gladiators and decided to go "all alien with it", surrounding the arena with "standing up bleachers".[99]
  • The Elementals (based on the Marvel Comics team of the same name) were a series of illusions created by the use of projectors and drones utilized by Quentin Beck to wreak havoc across the world. To mask their nature, Beck claimed that the Elementals were superpowered entities from Earth-833 that emerged from an inter-dimensional rift caused by the Snap. This iteration consists of the Wind, Earth, Fire, and Water Elemental; who are modeled after Cyclone, Sandman, Molten Man, and Hydro-Man respectively.[277] Quentin Beck, operating under the guise of Mysterio, claimed that they were born in a black hole and ravaged his reality of Earth-833. After Mysterio defeats the Wind and Earth Elementals off-screen, he goes on to fight the Water Elemental in Venice while Nick Fury and Maria Hill persuade Spider-Man to help Mysterio defeat the Fire Elemental in Prague. After finding a holographic projector, Peter Parker and MJ learn the truth and are hunted down by Beck and his accomplices, who create an Elemental Fusion monster to distract the world while he sets out to kill them. His plans are foiled when Spider-Man deactivates the drones inside the illusion and seemingly kills Beck.
  • The Westview anomaly, also referred to as the Maximoff anomaly and dubbed the "Hex" by Darcy Lewis, is a telekinetic boundary around the town of Westview, New Jersey created by Wanda Maximoff. The boundary could be unilaterally expanded by Maximoff to incorporate surrounding areas, warping reality and transforming objects and people on a molecular level, morphing the S.W.O.R.D. space rovers into circus vehicles, and morphing S.W.O.R.D. agents into clowns. Monica Rambeau gained superhuman abilities after passing through the barrier three times. The boundary is also what allowed Billy and Tommy Maximoff, as well as Wanda Maximoff's simulacrum of the Vision, to exist. The boundary was eventually removed by Wanda after attacks from Agatha Harkness and pressure from the residents of Westview. Wanda retained the barrier around her home long enough to bid Vision and her children farewell before letting it close in on them.
Surma person with arm scarification
  • Killmonger's scars are a series of around 3000 self-inflicted "crocodile scars" covering Erik "Killmonger" Stevens' body. Each one represents a confirmed kill from his time as an American black ops Navy SEAL. The scars are intended to resemble the scar tattoos of the Mursi and Surma tribes,[278] and consisted of 90 individually sculpted silicone molds that took two-and-a-half hours to apply.[279] Michael B. Jordan, who portrays Killmonger, had to sit in a sauna for two hours at the end of the day to remove the prosthetics when filming Black Panther.[153]
  • Loki's horned helmet is a golden horned helmet worn by Loki as well as his variants, including Sylvie, Classic Loki, Kid Loki, President Loki, and Alligator Loki. The helmet is a symbol of Asgardian royalty and also bears Satanic imagery, symbolizing the devil, according to Loki actor Tom Hiddleston.[280][281]
  • Steve Rogers' compass is a lensatic compass carried everywhere by Steve Rogers. The lid contains a picture of Peggy Carter, taken from a newspaper, which he views when he believes he is about to die, such as when he crashes the Valkyrie into the Arctic, or before he travels to the Garden to kill Thanos with the other Avengers.
  • Steve Rogers' notebook is a small notebook originally belonging to Steve Rogers which he used to keep a list of notable items, people, events, and pop culture elements which he missed during his time in suspended animation. The things noted on the list vary by the region where Captain America: The Winter Soldier was released.[282] Later, the notebook was passed on to Rogers' best friend, Bucky Barnes, who used it to keep a list of people whom he had wronged during his time as the Winter Soldier.[283][284] Eventually, after Barnes finishes making amends with everyone on the list, he leaves the notebook with his therapist, Dr. Christina Raynor, thanking her for her help.[285]
  • WandaVision is a sitcom broadcast by Wanda Maximoff in the Westview anomaly using her Chaos Magic abilities. Set in the town of Westview, New Jersey, the sitcom centered on Wanda Maximoff's family, which included the Vision, Billy Maximoff, and Tommy Maximoff. It also "starred" Agatha Harkness as Agnes, Ralph Bohner as Pietro Maximoff, Monica Rambeau as Geraldine, Todd and Sharon Davis as Arthur and Mrs. Hart, Abilash Tandon as Norm, Harold and Sarah Proctor as Phil and Dottie Jones, John Collins as Herb, Isabel Matsueda as Beverly, an unknown actor as Dennis, and Darcy Lewis as an unnamed character. The show was ultimately "cancelled" by Wanda (as described by Tyler Hayward) after her actions were discovered by the Vision and S.W.O.R.D. and she expanded the Hex in order to save the Vision's "life".
  • The Winter Soldier Book is a book formerly used by Hydra which contained Russian trigger words that would activate their Winter Soldiers into deadly assassins when spoken. It was later discovered by Helmut Zemo and used to activate Barnes into the Winter Soldier, using the words from the book: "Longing, rusted, seventeen, daybreak, furnace, nine, benign, homecoming, one, freight car".[a] The trigger words' effect is eventually nullified after Barnes is healed in Wakanda.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Russian: Желание, ржавый, семнадцать, рассвет, печь, девять, добросердечный, возвращение на родину, один, товарный вагон

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External links

Original content from Wikipedia, shared with licence Creative Commons By-Sa - Features of the Marvel Cinematic Universe