International sanctions during the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine

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  Russia

Countries that have introduced sanctions on Russia in 2014:
  Countries that have introduced sanctions
  European Union countries that have collectively introduced sanctions

Following Russia's invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, the United States, the European Union,[1] and other countries,[2] introduced or significantly expanded sanctions to include Vladimir Putin and other government members,[3] and cut off "selected Russian banks" from SWIFT,[4] triggering the 2022 Russian financial crisis and massive international boycott of Russia and Belarus.

Sanctions

After Russia invaded Ukraine on 24 February 2022, two countries that had not previously taken part in sanctions, namely South Korea[5] and non-UN member state Taiwan,[6] engaged in sanctions against Russia. On 28 February 2022, Singapore announced that it will impose banking sanctions against Russia for Ukraine invasion, thus making them the first country in Southeast Asia to impose sanctions upon Russia.[7] The sanctions also included materials that could be used for weapons against Ukraine, as well as electronics, technology devices and other related equipment, which were listed in a detailed statement on 5 March.[8][9]

On 28 February 2022, the Central Bank of Russia was blocked from accessing more than $400 billion in foreign-exchange reserves held abroad[10][11] and the EU imposed sanctions on several Russian oligarchs and politicians.[12]

Sergei Aleksashenko, the former Russian deputy finance minister, said: "This is a kind of financial nuclear bomb that is falling on Russia."[13] On 1 March 2022, the French finance minister Bruno Le Maire said the total amount of Russian assets being frozen by sanctions amounted to $1 trillion.[14]

Serbia, Mexico and Brazil have announced that they would not be participating in any economic sanctions against Russia.[15][16][17][18]

Western countries and others began imposing limited sanctions on Russia when it recognised the independence of Donbas. With the commencement of attacks on 24 February, a large number of other countries began applying sanctions with the aim of crippling the Russian economy. The sanctions were wide-ranging, targeting individuals, banks, businesses, monetary exchanges, bank transfers, exports, and imports.[1][2][19]

Faisal Islam of BBC News stated that the measures were far from normal sanctions and were "better seen as a form of economic war". The intent of the sanctions was to push Russia into a deep recession with the likelihood of bank runs and hyperinflation. Islam noted that targeting a G20 central bank in this way had never been done before.[20] Deputy Chairman of the Security Council of Russia and former president Dmitry Medvedev derided Western sanctions imposed on Russia, including personal sanctions, and commented that they were a sign of "political impotence" resulting from NATO's withdrawal from Afghanistan. He threatened to nationalise foreign assets that companies held inside Russia.[21]

Oil

Senator Roger Marshall introduced a bill on 1 March 2022 banning US imports of Russian oil, supported by the GOP minority leader of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and seven other Republicans. The first move by a Western nation to impose a flat blockade on Russian petroleum, its top moneymaker, came a day prior from Canada. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said that it "sends a powerful message."[22][23]

On 8 March, President Joe Biden ordered a ban on imports of oil, gas and coal from Russia to the US.[24]

US imports of Russian Oil a Month
US oil production, imports, & exports
US Natural Gas

Banking

In a 22 February speech,[25] US president Joe Biden announced restrictions against four Russian banks, including V.E.B., as well as on corrupt billionaires close to Putin.[26][27] UK prime minister Boris Johnson announced that all major Russian banks would have their assets frozen and be excluded from the UK financial system, and that some export licences to Russia would be suspended.[28] He also introduced a deposit limit for Russian citizens in UK bank accounts, and froze the assets of over 100 additional individuals and entities.[29]

Nord Stream, a natural gas pipeline, runs under the Baltic Sea, bypassing Ukraine. Germany imports 50% to 75% of its natural gas from Russia.[30] Nord Stream 2 would have doubled annual capacity of Nord Stream to 110 billion m3 (3.9 trillion cu ft).

The foreign ministers of the Baltic states called for Russia to be cut off from SWIFT, the global messaging network for international payments. Other EU member states had initially been reluctant to do this, both because European lenders held most of the nearly $30 billion in foreign banks' exposure to Russia and because China had developed an alternative to SWIFT called CIPS; a weaponisation of SWIFT would provide greater impetus to the development of CIPS which, in turn, could weaken SWIFT as well as the West's control over international finance.[31][32] Other leaders calling for Russia to be stopped from accessing SWIFT include Czech president Miloš Zeman,[33] and UK prime minister Boris Johnson.[34]

Germany had resisted calls for Russia to be banned from SWIFT, citing the effect it would have on payments for Russian gas and oil; on 26 February, the German foreign minister Annalena Baerbock and economy minister Robert Habeck made a joint statement backing targeted restrictions of Russia from SWIFT.[35][36] Shortly thereafter, it was announced that major Russian banks would be removed from SWIFT, although there would still be limited accessibility to ensure the continued ability to pay for gas shipments.[37] Furthermore, it was announced that the West would place sanctions on the Russian Central Bank, which holds $630bn in foreign reserves, to prevent it from liquidating assets to offset the impact of sanctions.[38]

On 26 February, two Chinese state banks—the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, which is the largest bank in the world, and the Bank of China, which is the country's biggest currency trader—were limiting financing to purchase Russian raw materials, which was limiting Russian access to foreign currency.[39] On 28 February, Switzerland froze a number of Russian assets and joined EU sanctions. According to Ignazio Cassis, the president of the Swiss Confederation, the decision was unprecedented but consistent with Swiss neutrality.[40] The same day, Monaco adopted economic sanctions and procedures for freezing funds identical to those taken by most European states.[41] Singapore became the first Southeast Asian country to impose sanctions on Russia by restricting banks and transactions linked to Russia;[42] the move was described by the South China Morning Post as being "almost unprecedented".[43] South Korea announced it would participate in the SWIFT ban against Russia, as well as announcing an export ban on strategic materials covered by the "Big 4" treaties to which Korea belongs—the Nuclear Suppliers Group, the Wassenaar Arrangement, the Australia Group, and the Missile Technology Control Regime; in addition, 57 non-strategic materials, including semiconductors, IT equipment, sensors, lasers, maritime equipment, and aerospace equipment, were planned to be included in the export ban "soon".[44]

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said that the EU "will bring about the collapse" of the economy of Russia.[45]

On 28 February, Japan announced that its central bank would join sanctions by limiting transactions with Russia's central bank, and would impose sanctions on Belarusian organisations and individuals, including President Aleksandr Lukashenko, because of Belarus' "evident involvement in the invasion" of Ukraine.[46] According to The Wall Street Journal, payments for energy raw materials have been largely spared from these measures. The Central Bank of Russia was blocked from accessing more than $400 billion in foreign-exchange reserves held abroad.[10][47] Sergei Aleksashenko, the former Russian deputy finance minister, said: "This is a kind of financial nuclear bomb that is falling on Russia."[48] EU foreign affairs chief Josep Borrell said that Western nations "cannot block the reserves of the Russian central bank in Moscow or in China".[49]

On 1 March, the Grand and General Council of San Marino authorised the country's government to take sanctions against Russia, and rejected that the measures had a military content.[50] The same day, the French finance minister Bruno Le Maire said that Russian assets being frozen by sanctions amounted to $1 trillion.[51] South Korea announced it would stop all transactions with 7 main Russian banks and their affiliates, restrict the purchase of Russian treasury bonds, and agreed to "immediately implement" and join any further economics sanctions imposed against Russia by the European Union.[52][53]

Following sanctions and criticisms of their relations with Russian business, many companies chose to exit Russian or Belarussian markets voluntarily or in order to avoid potential future sanctions.[54] Visa, Mastercard, and American Express independently blocked Russian banks as of 2 March.[55] Following Swiss sanctions on Russia, Credit Suisse issued orders to destroy documents linking Russian oligarchs to yacht loans, a move which led to considerable criticism.[56]

Export

[57] The US instituted export controls, a novel sanction focused on restricting Russian access to high-tech components, both hardware and software, made with any parts or intellectual property from the US. The sanction required that any person or company that wanted to sell technology, semiconductors, encryption software, lasers, or sensors to Russia request a licence, which by default was denied. The enforcement mechanism involved sanctions against the person or company, with the sanctions focused on the shipbuilding, aerospace, and defence industries.[58]

On 20 March 2022, Australia banned the export of alumina, bauxite and other aluminium ores to Russia.[59]

EU sanctions

A worker removes the sign from Gazprom's office in Vienna in March 2022

On the morning of 24 February, Ursula von der Leyen, the president of the European Commission, announced "massive" EU sanctions to be adopted by the union. The sanctions targeted technological transfers, Russian banks, and Russian assets.[60] Josep Borrell, the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, stated that Russia would face "unprecedented isolation" as the EU would impose the "harshest package of sanctions [which the union has] ever implemented". He also said that "these are among the darkest hours of Europe since the Second World War".[61] President of the European Parliament Roberta Metsola called for "immediate, quick, solid and swift action" and convened an extraordinary session of Parliament for 1 March.[62][63]

European impoundment of yachts

A 5 April 2022 article by Insider claims the total cost of yachts impounded throughout Europe be over $2 billion. This amount includes the motoryacht Tango, seized pursuant to United States sanctions with Spanish assistance.[64]

France

On 26 February, the French Navy intercepted Russian cargo ship Baltic Leader in the English Channel. The ship was suspected of belonging to a company targeted by the sanctions. The ship was escorted to the port of Boulogne-sur-Mer and was being investigated.[65]

On 2 March 2022, French customs officials seized the yacht Amore Vero at a shipyard in La Ciotat. The Amore Vero is believed to be owned by the sanctioned oligarch Igor Sechin.[66]

Two yachts belonging to Alexei Kuzmichevof Alfa Bank were seized by France on March 24. [67]

Germany
Dilbar-Barcelona 2017

On 2 March 2022, German authorities immobilized the Dilbar, owned by Alisher Usmanov[68][69] She is reported to have cost $800 million, employ 84 full-time crew members, and contain the largest indoor swimming pool installed on a superyacht at 180 cubic metres.[70]

Italy
Motor Yacht Lady M

On 4 March, Italian police impounded the Lady M. Authorities believe the ship is owned by Alexei Mordashov.[71] The same day, Italian police seized the yacht of Gennady Timchenko, the Lena, in the port city of Sanremo.[72] The yacht was also placed on a United States sanctions list.[73] On 12 March 2022, Italian authorities in the port of Trieste seized the Sailing Yacht A, known to be owned by Andrey Melnichenko. A spokesperson for Melnichenko vowed to contest the seizure.[74]

Spain

In March 2022, the Spanish Ministry of Development (known by its acronym "MITMA") detained three yachts pending investigation into whether their true owners are individuals sanctioned by the European Union. The Valerie is detained in the Port of Barcelona; Lady Anastasia in Port Adriano in Calvià, Mallorca; and the Crescent in the Port of Tarragona.[75][76][77]

United Kingdom

On 29 March 2022 Grant Shapps, the British secretary of state for transport, announced the National Crime Agency's seizure of the PHI. The yacht was docked at Canary Wharf and was about to leave.[78][79]

Aviation

The EU sanctions introduced on 25 February included a ban on the sale of aircraft and spare parts,[80] and also required lessors to terminate the leases on aircraft placed with Russian airlines by the end of March.[81]

Services and spare parts

On 2 March, Airbus and Boeing both suspended maintenance support for Russian airlines.[82] On 11 March, China blocked the supply of aircraft parts to Russia.[83] Business jet manufacturer Bombardier Aviation announced that, in addition to suspending after-sales service activities, it had cancelled all outstanding orders placed by Russian individuals or companies.[84]

Leased aircraft

On 10 March, Russia passed legislation outlining conditions to impede the return of leased aircraft to foreign lessors, including the need for approval from a government committee and payment of settlements in Roubles.[85] Many aircraft operated by Russian airlines had been registered with the Bermuda registry, which suspended airworthiness approvals on 14 March.[86] The same day, Russia implemented a law allowing aircraft operated by Russian airlines to be re-registered with the Russian registry, effectively confiscating them from their overseas owners. Some 515 commercial aircraft, valued at approximately $10 billion, were leased by Russian airlines from foreign lessors prior to the sanctions.[87] Lessors moved swiftly to repossess those few aircraft "stranded" outside Russia[88] and reassigned some new aircraft due to be placed with Russian airlines, particularly Boeing 737 MAX that are now unlikely ever to be recertified by Russia.[89] By 22 March, 78 Russian aircraft had been repossessed, amid speculation that some Russian airlines were cooperating with lessors in order to avoid jeopardising future relations.[90] Rossiya Airlines, a subsidiary of Aeroflot, had reregistered all its fleet with the Russian registry by 29 March, and ensured that international flights used only Russian-owned aircraft.[91]

By 30 March, Irish lessor AerCap had repossessed 22 of the 135 aircraft it had leased to Russian airlines, and 3 of the 14 engines on lease. It filed insurance claims totalling $3.5 billion for the remaining aircraft, many of which were "now being flown illegally by [its] former airline customers".[92] Singapore-based lessor BOC Aviation had 18 aircraft worth $935 million on lease to Russian companies; it repossessed from Hong Kong one Boeing 747-8F leased to AirBridgeCargo but two other freighters were flown back to Russia contrary to explicit instructions, despite their insurance coverage and airworthiness certificates having been revoked.[93]

Airspace

On 24 February 2022, Ukrainian airspace was closed to civilian aircraft a few hours before the Russian invasion started, on the basis of a notification from the Russian Ministry of Defence. The European regulator EASA issued a Conflict Zone Information Bulletin (CZIB) warning that civilian aircraft could be misidentified or even directly targeted.[94]

On 25 February, the UK announced the closure of its airspace to Russian airlines.[95] On 27 February, the EU and Canada closed their airspace to all Russian aircraft, including both commercial and private aircraft.[96] Russia issued a reciprocal ban, forcing many airlines to reroute or cancel flights to Asian destinations.[97] The US issued a similar ban on 1 March.[98] On 8 March, Aeroflot suspended all its remaining flights to international destinations (except for Minsk, Belarus) due to airspace restrictions[99] and to counter the "risk" of aircraft being repossessed by lessors.[100] On 9 March, to avoid Russian airspace, Finnair started routing its flights to Asia over the North Pole, the first time a polar route has been used for commercial flights in nearly 30 years.[101]

By 29 March, Russian aircraft were prohibited from the continental European airspace of all 27 member states of the European Union, along with the airspace of Albania, Canada, Iceland, Kosovo, Moldova, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Norway, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States.[102] Aircraft were also specifically prohibited from the subnational territories of Anguilla,[103] Aruba,[104] Bermuda,[105] Bonaire,[106] British Virgin Islands,[107] Cayman Islands,[108] Faroe Islands,[109] Gibraltar,[110] Greenland,[111] Montserrat,[112] Saba,[113] Saint Helena,[114] Sint Eustatius,[115] Sint Maarten,[116] Turks and Caicos Islands.[117][importance?]

Russian aircraft manufacturing industry

EASA revoked the type certificates of the Sukhoi Superjet 100, Tupolev Tu-204 and four other Russian aircraft types on 14 March, as well as approvals of maintenance organisations and third-country authorisations for Russian airlines. EASA also suspended all work on new certification applications, including the Irkut MC-21 airliner.[118] Due to the need to source all aircraft components domestically, notably the Pratt & Whitney PW1400G engines which will be replaced by Russian-built Aviadvigatel PD-14 units, production of the MC-21 is expected to be delayed by 2 years. In the meantime, production of older and less fuel-efficient Russian-built aircraft such as the Tupolev Tu-214 and Ilyushin Il-96-400 will be stepped up, and a fuel subsidy introduced.[119] The Sino-Russian CR929 wide-body aircraft programme, which was already in difficulty due to the diverging expectations of the two parties, is also expected to suffer significant delays or even cancellation.[120]

Individuals

On 15 March, Aeroflot CEO Mikhail Poluboyarinov, targeted by EU sanctions, was removed from the IATA board of governors.[121]

U.S. "freeze and seize" policy

The main United States sanctions law, IEEPA, blocks the designated person or entity's assets, and also prohibits any United States person from transacting business with the designated person or entity. Specifically, 50 U.S.C. § 1705 criminalizes activities that "violate, attempt to violate, conspire to violate, or cause a violation of any license, order, regulation, or prohibition," and allows for fines up to $1,000,000, imprisonment up to 20 years, or both. Additionally, United States asset forfeiture laws allow for the seizure of assets considered to be the proceeds of criminal activity.

On 3 February 2022, John "Jack" Hanick was arrested in London for violating sanctions against Konstantin Malofeev, owner of Tsargrad TV. Malofeev is targeted for sanctions by the European Union and United States for material and financial support to Donbass separatists.[122][123][124][125][126][127][a] Hanick was the first person criminally indicted for violating United States sanctions during the War in Ukraine.[129]

According to court records, Hanick has been under sealed indictment in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York since November 2021. The indictment was unsealed March 3, 2022. Hanick awaits extradition from the United Kingdom to the United States.[130][131]

Footage from the 4 April 2022 seizure of the Motoryacht Tango in Palma de Mallorca from a warrant executed by Guardia Civil, Homeland Security Investigations and Federal Bureau of Investigation
United States Attorney General Merrick B. Garland announces the seizure of the Motoryacht Tango on 4 April 2022.

In the March 1, 2022 State of the Union Address, American President Joe Biden announced an effort to target the wealth of Russian oligarchs.

Tonight, I say to the Russian oligarchs and the corrupt leaders who’ve bilked billions of dollars off this violent regime: No more.

The United States — I mean it. The United States Department of Justice is assembling a dedicated task force to go after the crimes of the Russian oligarchs.

We’re joining with European Allies to find and seize their yachts, their luxury apartments, their private jets. We’re coming for your ill-begotten gains.[132]

On March 2, 2022, U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland announced the formation of Task Force KleptoCapture, an inter-agency effort. [133]

On March 11, 2022, United States President Joseph R. Biden signed Executive Order 14068, "Prohibiting Certain Imports, Exports, and New Investment With Respect to Continued Russian Federation Aggression," an order of economic sanctions under the United States International Emergency Economic Powers Act against several oligarchs. The order targeted two properties of Viktor Vekselberg worth an estimated $180 million: an Airbus A319-115 jet and the motoryacht Tango.[134] Estimates of the value of the Tango range from $90 million (U.S. Department of Justice estimate) to $120 million (from the website Superyachtfan.com).

On April 4 2022, the yacht was seized by Civil Guard of Spain and U.S. federal agents in Mallorca. A United States Department of Justice press release states that the seizure of the Tango was by request of Task Force KleptoCapture, an interagency task force operated through the U.S. Deputy Attorney General. [135][136][137]

The matter is pending in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. The affidavit for the seizure warrant states that the yacht is seized on probable cause to suspect violations of 18 U.S.C. § 1349 (conspiracy to commit bank fraud), 50 U.S.C. § 1705 (International Emergency Economic Powers Act), and 18 U.S.C. § 1956 (money laundering), and as authorized by American statutes on civil and criminal asset forfeiture.[138]

Summary of sanctions per state

Oil imports Swift banking ban Russian flights Minerals exports "Strategic" materials Sanctions on Belarus Fossil gas imports Coal imports Miscellaneous/others
 European Union No Yes Yes Yes No No
 United States Yes Yes Yes Yes
  Switzerland Yes Yes
 South Korea No[139] Yes Yes Yes
 Australia Yes Yes Alumina/Bauxite
 Canada Yes Yes Yes
 Japan No N/A Yes No No Ban on luxury cars
 United Kingdom Yes Yes Yes N/A
 Brazil No No No N/A No Announced it would not put sanctions
 San Marino Yes Yes
 Singapore Yes
 Mexico No No No No No No
 Taiwan Yes Yes
 Malaysia N/A[140] No No No No No No No
 Norway No oil imports Aligned with EU sanctions[141][verification needed] Idem Idem Idem Idem Idem Idem
 Vietnam No No No No No No No No
 Georgia Aligns with EU sanctions[142][verification needed] Aligns with EU sanctions Aligns with EU sanctions Aligns with EU sanctions Aligns with EU sanctions Aligns with EU sanctions Aligns with EU sanctions

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Through Malofeev, Hanick is close to the pro Russia former Greek defense minister Panos Kammenos and Vladimir Putin gives carte blanche to Tsargrad TV which according to Malofeev is the Russian equivalent to Fox News.[128]

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Original content from Wikipedia, shared with licence Creative Commons By-Sa - International sanctions during the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine