List of unproduced television projects based on Marvel Comics

Wikimedia list article

Encyclopedia from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of unmade and unreleased television projects based on Marvel Comics. Some of these productions were, or still are, in development hell. Projects that have not provided significant production announcements within at least a year, would be considered in development limbo until further announcements are released. The following include live-action and animated productions created for television. Along with Marvel Comics properties, projects based on their imprints (Icon Comics, Malibu Comics, CrossGen, Star Comics, Razorline, and Epic Comics) are included.

Live action

Richard Egan's Namor

In the 1950s, a television series based on the character Namor was planned starring Richard Egan, but it never finished production.[1][2]

Sub-Mariner

In the early 1970s, a different Sub-Mariner television pilot was in development but never finished filming due to the similarity of the short-lived Man from Atlantis series.[3]

Daredevil and the Black Widow

In 1975, Angela Bowie secured the TV rights to Daredevil and Black Widow for a duration of one year and planned a TV series based on the two characters. Bowie had photographer Terry O'Neill take a series of pictures of herself as Black Widow and actor Ben Carruthers as Daredevil (with wardrobe by Natasha Kornilkoff) to shop the project around to producers, but the project never came to fruition.[4]

Daredevil

In 1983, ABC planned a live-action Daredevil pilot. Academy Award-winning writer Stirling Silliphant completed the draft of the program, but it was not aired.[5]

The Amazing Spider-Man revival

In a 2002 interview with SFX magazine, Nicholas Hammond revealed that there were plans to do an The Amazing Spider-Man series reunion movie in 1984. The proposal would have had the original cast team-up with the cast of The Incredible Hulk television series (a major hit for CBS), with Hammond appearing in the black Spider-Man costume. According to Hammond, a deal was arranged to have Columbia and Universal Studios co-produce the project. Bill Bixby was going to direct the TV-movie, in addition to reprising the role of David Banner. However, Universal eventually cancelled the project. Hammond said he was told that Lou Ferrigno was unavailable to reprise his role as the Hulk, because he was in Italy filming Hercules. However, in his 2003 autobiography My Incredible Life as the Hulk, Ferrigno stated that he was never contacted about the project, adding that he had recently finished filming Hercules II and that his availability was not an issue.[6]

Dr. Strange

Philip DeGuere was given an ample budget for Dr. Strange, which he wrote, directed and produced. The film was shot on Universal sets in Los Angeles, going over-schedule by several days because of the special effects, which included a lot of the era's green screen. Friend and composer Paul Chiraha was encouraged to produce an electronic score. Chirara, interviewed in 2016, said that DeGuere had high hopes for the film, and was crushed when it "tanked".[7]

In January 1985, Stan Lee recounted the largely positive experience of working on Dr. Strange, compared with the other live-action Marvel Comics adaptations under the publisher's development deal with CBS and Universal in the late 1970s, saying, "I probably had the most input into that one. I've become good friends with the writer/producer Phil DeGuere. I was pleased with Dr. Strange and The [Incredible] Hulk. I think that Dr. Strange would have done much better than it did in the ratings except that it aired opposite Roots. Those are the only experiences I've had with live action television. Dr. Strange and The Hulk were fine. Captain America was a bit [of a] disappointment and Spider-Man was a total nightmare."[8] CBS did not pick up Dr. Strange as a series.

The Young Astronauts

In 1985, The Young Astronauts, produced by Marvel Productions, concerned a 21st-century family aboard the interplanetary transport ship Courageous, along with their cat and a comical maintenance "droid". It was slated to be a Saturday-morning midseason replacement on CBS.[9] A Star Comics comic book series from Marvel Comics was planned to be released before the cartoon, but was also canceled for the same reason. An advertisement that appeared in many comic books in 1986, which promoted the upcoming fall lineup for CBS Saturday morning, prominently featured a drawing of The Young Astronauts along with other shows set to air that fall.[10] The show never aired due to the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster causing CBS to cancel the show before it finished production.[11]

Thor / The Incredible Hulk

In 1988, Thor appeared in the live action television film The Incredible Hulk Returns, which was meant to be a pilot episode for a live action Thor series.[12] Thor was played by Eric Allan Kramer, and Donald Blake by Steve Levitt.[13]

Daredevil / The Incredible Hulk

As was the case with The Incredible Hulk Returns, the 1989 telefilm The Trial of the Incredible Hulk also acted as a backdoor television pilot for a series for Daredevil, but went unproduced for unknown reasons.[14] Rex Smith portrayed Matt Murdock / Daredevil in the pilot.[15]

She-Hulk

She-Hulk was announced as co-star of an October 1989 made-for-TV film headlining the Incredible Hulk, the third reunion/sequel to the live-action Incredible Hulk series with Bill Bixby and Lou Ferrigno reprising their roles. Although no specific title or actress was announced, in early July of that year it was still firmly expected to air that autumn.[16] A third Hulk telefilm did appear in February 1990 without any additional Marvel character adapted. A year later, a proposed She-Hulk series for the ABC network was "dead."[17] In August 2019, a different She-Hulk series was announced for Disney+, set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.[18]

The Revenge of the Incredible Hulk

Despite the Hulk's death in the 1990 film, the movie's makers had intended from the start for him to return in The Revenge of the Incredible Hulk, again with Gerald Di Pego as writer.[19][20][21] In early July 1989, Iron Man was planned to make a brief appearance.[22] As of July 10, 1990, a script was being written.[22] It has been reported that the fourth film would have featured the Hulk with Banner's mind,[23] and that the project was canceled because of Bill Bixby's struggle with cancer,[24] but Di Pego has refuted both these claims as fan rumors, pointing out that Bixby's health had not yet begun to decline at the time the film was canceled. Di Pego said that the plot for The Revenge of the Incredible Hulk began with Banner being revived, but no longer able to change into the Hulk. Banner then begins to work for the government in order to prevent accidents like the one that turned him into the Hulk, but is captured by villains and coerced into turning their agents into Hulk-like beings. According to Di Pego, at the film's climax Banner would be forced to recreate the accident that transformed him into the Hulk in order to stop the villains' plans.[25] The sequel was canceled because of the disappointing ratings for The Death of the Incredible Hulk.[25]

Power Pack

Following the cancellation of the original comic, Paragon Entertainment Corporation and New World Television developed Power Pack into a live-action show for NBC's Saturday Morning Kids block. While a pilot episode was made, the series was passed on and the pilot was later picked up by Fox, which chose to broadcast it as a Saturday morning special, on September 28, 1991, rather than ordering an entire series. The 27-minute pilot has subsequently been aired a few times on Fox Kids during the off-season.[26] Minor alterations to the concept were made for the pilot, ranging from the children's parents being aware of their superhuman abilities, Julie's acceleration power being altered to her being able to move at superhuman speed, without the ability to fly, and the "cloud" aspect of Jack's density power being eliminated; he was only able to shrink in size. The children did not wear costumes.

Stealth Warriors

In November 1993, Rick Ungar was developing Stealth Warriors for Marvel Comics.[27]

Generation X

Generation X is a FOX television pilot directed by Jack Sholder that aired on February 20, 1996. It is based on the Marvel Comics comic-book series of the same name, a spin-off of the X-Men franchise. It was produced by New World Entertainment and Marvel Entertainment Group.[28][29][30] After talks of a TV series stalled, just before the release, the TV special was testing the waters for a series of TV movies instead, with nothing coming out since.[31]

Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. was a pilot episode from 1998 based on the Marvel Comics character Nick Fury.[32] The pilot was broadcast for BBC One and FOX on May 26, 1998. Directed by Rod Hardy, the film stars David Hasselhoff as Fury, a retired super spy who is approached to return to duty to take down the terrorist organization HYDRA, who threaten to attack Manhattan with a pathogen they have reconstituted known as the Death's Head virus. Lisa Rinna plays Contessa Valentina "Val" Allegra de Fontaine, and Sandra Hess plays Andrea von Strucker / Viper. The film was met with a mixed to poor reception, resulting in the studio not picking up the series.[33] A different Nick Fury TV series was in development, around 2001.[34] Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. was given a DVD release on September 30, 2008.[35]

Bloodstone

In 2001, a Ulysses Bloodstone-centered TV series was in development.[36]

Daughters of the Dragon

An intended Daughters of the Dragon TV series was in development in March 2001,[37] The series would have featured Colleen Wing and two other Daughters, but not Misty Knight.[38] The series was never produced, with Wing and Knight eventually making their debut appearances in the shared universe of Marvel's Netflix series.[39][40]

Ectokid

In August 2001, Ectokid was planned as a television show to air on Nickelodeon. Barker would have acted as an executive producer of the television show, with Daley and Murphy as producers. Talking to Daily Variety, Barker explained that his aim was to create "a franchisable world" for the studio, "of great, transcendent beauty; one that reconfigures people's expectations of what ghosts are, of what comes after death."[41]

Night Thrasher

A Night Thrasher TV series was originally in early stages of development for UPN in 2002, before eventually being scrapped.[42][43]

Brother Voodoo

In January 2003, Syfy ordered a live-action made-for-TV-movie and backdoor pilot based on the Marvel Comics supernatural character Brother Voodoo. Hans Rodionoff was announced to write the screenplay, set in New Orleans, of this Reveille Productions and Marvel Studios co-production executive produced by Reveille head Ben Silverman and Marvel Studios' Avi Arad and Rick Ungar.[44]

The Crossovers

In March 2003, CrossGen was in negotiations for a live-action, prime-time television series adaptation of The Crossovers, with Davis Entertainment.[45][46]

Skrull Kill Krew

In 2006, a television series based on Skrull Kill Krew was in development. At some point in time, Marvel ceased development for unknown reasons.[47]

Alter Ego

In 2006, a television series based on Alter Ego was in development. At some point in time, production was halted for unknown reasons.[48] In 2015, a different adaptation of Alias was produced by Netflix, which was developed by Melissa Rosenberg for ABC Studios and Marvel Television. The name change was needed due to the unrelated ABC series Alias.[49]

Moon Knight

In 2006, Marvel Studios and No Equal Entertainment announced a live-action Moon Knight TV series.[50] Writer Jon Cooksey confirmed in 2008 that he was developing the Moon Knight television series.[51] In August 2019, a different Moon Knight series was announced for Disney+, set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.[52]

FX's Powers

In 2009, Brian Michael Bendis confirmed plans to develop a Powers television show on FX as well as his involvement as the writer of the pilot for the show.[53] In February 2011, a greenlit pilot of the show scripted by Charles H. Eglee was announced as a co-production by Sony Pictures Television and FX Networks.[54] Charles S. Dutton became the first cast member in May 2011 when he signed on to play Captain Cross.[55] In June, 2011, filming in Chicago was scheduled to start within a few weeks.[56] The following week, Lucy Punch was cast as Deena Pilgrim.[57] Katee Sackhoff had campaigned for the part.[58] Although FX was rumored to be courting Kyle Chandler for the part of Walker,[58] the next day Jason Patric was cast in the part.[59][60] Later in June, Carly Foulkes was cast as RetroGirl[61] and Bailee Madison was cast as Calista.[62] Filming began in Chicago in early July 2011 and ended in early August.[63] In November 2011, FX announced that it would reshoot the Powers pilot.[64] Bendis tweeted that "the reshoots are planned for January and are all about tone and clarity".[65] In April 2012, more scripts were ordered and writing continued, but more reshoots and recasting were being discussed by the network.[66] Work on this project halted, when on March 19, 2014, it was announced that Powers would become the first original television series from the PlayStation Network, with a different cast and writers.[67][68] The new series premiered on March 10, 2015.[69]

Carol Danvers / Jessica Jones

In July 2011, Carol Danvers was intended to make her Marvel Cinematic Universe debut in the series Jessica Jones when it was developed for ABC, but the character changed to Trish Walker when it moved to Netflix, due to the changes in the direction of the MCU storyline, such as the decision for Danvers to appear in her own film.[70][71]

Mockingbird

In July 2011, a Mockingbird series was in development at ABC Family.[70] This adaptation never materialized, with a different iteration of the character appearing in a 2014 episode of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.[72]

FOX's Punisher

In October 2011, FOX was developing The Punisher as an hour long TV series.[73] The project was eventually cancelled, in May 2012.[74] A different series centered around the Punisher was released onto Netflix in 2017.[75]

Dreadstar

On February 17, 2015, Jim Starlin teamed with Universal Cable Productions to adapt Dreadstar as a scripted TV series with Chris Bender and J. C. Spink as producers.[76]

Empire of the Dead

In May 2015, Empire of the Dead was being planned as an adaptation of George A. Romero's comic series.[77] The series was going to be written and executive produced by Romero and Peter Grunwald. Demarest executives Sam Englebardt and William D. Johnson would have also executive produced. In November 2015, AMC acquired the TV rights on the series.[78]

Hellfire

In October 2015, a live action television series titled Hellfire was under development by 20th Century Fox Television and Marvel Television with an early 2017 air date,[79][80][81] but on July 12, 2016, Variety reports that the project is no longer moving forward.[82]

Untitled comedy series

In January 2016, Stan Lee announced that an untitled comedy series was in the works.[83]

Captain Britain

In March 2016, it was reported in the British media that Marvel had plans to start a new series starring Captain Britain.[84][85]

Scarlet

In June 2016, Brian Michael Bendis was developing a TV series based on his comic series Scarlet for Cinemax.[86]

Untitled Kingsman series

In June 2018, upon announcing his new film studio, Matthew Vaughn revealed that an eight-episode Kingsman television series was in early development at 20th Century Fox Television.[87]

Animated

Ant-Man and the Wasp

In the 1980s, an Ant-Man and the Wasp animated series was in development, but was eventually abandoned.[88]

Iron Man

In 1980, an Iron Man TV series was one of several pitches, resulting in an unaired pilot and an abandoned prospect of a full-fledged series.[89]

Daredevil and Lightning the Super-Dog

In the 1980s, ABC had planned a Daredevil animated television series that would have featured a guide dog named "Lightning the Super-Dog".[90][91] Television writer Mark Evanier said in 2008 that he was the last in a line of writers to have written a pilot and series bible, with his including Lightning as a guide dog without superpowers.[90] Production stills for a proposed Daredevil animated series meant to air on Fox Kids were made.[92]

X-Men: Pryde of the X-Men

X-Men: Pryde of the X-Men is a pun on the name of Kitty Pryde, the youngest of the X-Men. The series that this episode was intended to launch never materialized; Marvel Productions would have to go back to the drawing board for 1992's X-Men. Funding for this pilot actually came from the budget for RoboCop: The Animated Series. Instead of making a 13th episode of RoboCop, Marvel Productions decided to use their funding to have Toei Animation produce the animation for this pilot. The pilot itself is most specifically influenced by issues #129[93]-139[94] of Uncanny X-Men. Shortly after this pilot was delivered, Marvel started having financial issues (New World Pictures, who purchased the Marvel Entertainment Group or MEG from Cadence Industries in 1986, sold MEG in January 1989 to the Andrews Group) and stopped work on just about everything but Muppet Babies. This pilot effectively marked the end of the Marvel animated universe created by DePatie-Freleng Enterprises/Marvel Productions, which began with Fantastic Four (1978) and continued with Spider-Woman (1979), Spider-Man (1981), Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (1981) and The Incredible Hulk (1982). The X-Men themselves had previously guest starred in several episodes of Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends, although that particular series isn't necessarily in the same continuity as "Pryde of the X-Men".

Solarman

In 1988 a 22-minute animated Solarman pilot was produced, which its creator David Oliphant maintained ownership of, since he produced over $400,000 for its production, with Marvel acting as a licensee. It was released on VHS as a cross promotion tie-in with the first issue of Marvel Comics' adaptation. The pilot finally aired on October 24, 1992, as a special on Fox Kids, a week prior to the debut of the X-Men animated series. According to Oliphant, a major studio offered $15 million to create 64 animated episodes of Solarman, but the studio cancelled this offer soon after on the advice of their consultants, who cautioned that Saturday morning superhero cartoons would soon die out in popularity.[95]

Ruby-Spears Thor

Artwork by Jack Kirby from a planned Thor animated series, in the 1980s, by Ruby-Spears Productions has surfaced.[96]

Captain America

In the 1990s, a planned Captain America animated series from Saban Entertainment to air on Fox Kids proposed that Captain America's true name was Tommy Tompkins, with "Steve Rogers" being a cover name assigned to him by the U.S. Army. The Red Skull would appear as the main antagonist. The series was cancelled during production with scripts written, characters designed and a one-minute pitch film produced, because of Marvel's bankruptcy.[97][98][99]

FOX's Thor

There was another attempt at an animated Thor TV series in 2000, for FOX.[100] Since then, there has been no further development.

Untitled Deadpool animated series

In May 2017, FXX placed a series order for an animated series based on Deadpool, to be co-produced by Marvel Television, FX Productions and ABC Signature Studios. Donald Glover and his brother Stephen Glover were announced as showrunners, executive producers and writers for the series.[101] In late March 2018, it was announced that FXX would not move forward with the series due to creative differences.[102][103] Stephen Glover later admitted that the "creative difference" in question involved an episode revolving around Taylor Swift which FXX stated was the "last straw" and that they wanted to give Rick and Morty "a run for its money".[104]

The Offenders Hulu series

In February 2019, Hulu ordered adult animated Marvel series based on MODOK, Hit-Monkey, Tigra and Dazzler, and Howard the Duck, leading up to a crossover special titled The Offenders.[105] In January 2020, Marvel decided not to move forward with Howard the Duck, Tigra & Dazzler, and The Offenders, with M.O.D.O.K. and Hit Monkey continuing as planned.[106]

See also

References

  1. ^ Brevoort, Tom "1950s" in Gilbert (2008), p. 61: "Martin Goodman had been in talks with television executives about turning Namor's adventures into a live-action TV series, reportedly to star actor Richard Egan. However, negotiations wound up going nowhere, and, as a result, Sub-Mariner's extended lease on life came to an end with issue #42."
  2. ^ Tipton, Scott (May 12, 2004). "Under Pressure". Comics101. Archived from the original on March 8, 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2008. the success of the George Reeves Superman TV series had prompted some TV producers to develop a Sub-Mariner series, which was reportedly to star B-movie actor Richard Egan, who's probably best known for his turn in Walt Disney's Hayley Mills vehicle Pollyana. When plans for the TV series sunk to Davy Jones' locker, so did Namor's new comic book.
  3. ^ Rico, Jack (August 27, 2008). "Will Michael Phelps play 'Namor the SubMariner' on film?". ShowBizCafe.com. Archived from the original on March 8, 2013. Retrieved February 12, 2011.
  4. ^ Mithra, Kuljit (April 1, 2013). "Daredevil/Black Widow TV Series (1975)". ManWithoutFear.com. Archived from the original on April 2, 2013. Retrieved April 1, 2013.
  5. ^ Howe, Sean (2012). Marvel Comics: The Untold Story. New York: HarperCollins. p. 261. ISBN 978-0061992100.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ Couch, Aaron (November 1, 2016). "'Dr. Strange': The Untold Story of the 1978 TV Movie Everyone "Had Great Hopes For"". The Hollywood Reporter.
  8. ^ "A Talk With The Man, Stan Lee". Comics Feature (33A): 40. January 1985.
  9. ^ Anderson, Jack (January 11, 1985). "Young Astronaut Program Is Taking Off". The Tuscaloosa News (111). p. 4. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved June 25, 2014.
  10. ^ "Wrestling Cartoon Puts Hold On Taste – tribunedigital-orlandosentinel". Articles.orlandosentinel.com. April 24, 1985. Archived from the original on February 23, 2012. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  11. ^ Carter, Robert L. (August 1, 1990). "Marvel Entertainment Group v. Young Astronaut Council". Leagle.com. Leagle, Inc. Archived from the original on September 18, 2016. Retrieved August 7, 2016. Because of this, the show was postponed by CBS from the fall projected airing, although it was not cancelled. Eventually, YAC restrained the consultant and gave Marvel the freedom to go ahead with CBS' plans, and there was a meeting with CBS, Marvel and YAC in January, 1986, to discuss the show. The day after this meeting the space shuttle exploded and CBS notified the parties that the show was being cancelled.
  12. ^ Goldman, Eric (April 25, 2012). "The Avengers: Thor's TV History". IGN. Archived from the original on June 16, 2013. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  13. ^ O'Connor, John J. (May 20, 1988). "TV Weekend; Incredible Hulk Meets Mighty Thor". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 16, 2013. Retrieved August 10, 2010.
  14. ^ Harmetz, Aljean (October 11, 1988). "Superheroes' Battleground: Prime Time". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 3, 2018. Retrieved August 12, 2010.
  15. ^ "F.O.O.M. (Flashbacks of Ol' Marvel) #16: "I'm Free Now – The Incredible Hulk (1988–1990)"". Comic Bulletin. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013. Retrieved September 9, 2010.
  16. ^ "Comics Screen". Comics Scene. No. 9. Starlog Communications International, Inc. October 1989. p. 70.
  17. ^ "Comics Screen". Comics Scene. No. 15. Starlog Communications International, Inc. October 1990. p. 70.
  18. ^ Couch, Aaron (August 23, 2019). "Marvel Unveils 3 New Disney+ Shows Including 'She-Hulk' and 'Moon Knight'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on August 23, 2019. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  19. ^ "F.O.O.M. (Flashbacks of Ol' Marvel) #16: "I'm Free Now – The Incredible Hulk (1988-1990)"". ComicBulletin. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013. Retrieved September 9, 2010.
  20. ^ "Hulk Smash Television!". IGN. Archived from the original on March 27, 2012. Retrieved September 9, 2010.
  21. ^ "Marvel In The 90's: THE DEATH OF THE INCREDIBLE HULK". Twitch Film. Archived from the original on November 9, 2011. Retrieved February 3, 2012.
  22. ^ a b Comics Scene. Starlog Communications International, Inc. 1990. pp. 69–70.
  23. ^ The Incredible Lou Archived January 25, 2019, at the Wayback Machine, Papa Llama's Convention Report, 7 November 2008.
  24. ^ Jankiewicz, Patrick. You wouldn't like me when I'm angry. Duncan Okla.: BearManor Media. ISBN 1593936508.
  25. ^ a b Glenn, Greenberg (February 2014). "The Televised Hulk". Back Issue!. TwoMorrows Publishing (70): 26.
  26. ^ Tim Webber (December 19, 2016). "16 Forgotten Comic Book TV Specials". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on August 3, 2018. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  27. ^ Freeman, Mike (November 1, 1993). "New world of animation: former Marvel Entertainment chief Rick Ungar will head new division concentrating on original animated series, including upcoming 'Stealth Warriors.'". Broadcasting & Cable. Archived from the original on June 29, 2014.
  28. ^ "The History of Wolverine and the X-Men on TV". IGN. Archived from the original on March 27, 2012. Retrieved August 21, 2010.
  29. ^ "Fox Tuesday Night at the Movies Generation X". Variety. Archived from the original on December 27, 2014. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
  30. ^ "Marvel In The 90's: GENERATION X". Twitch Film. Archived from the original on August 24, 2014. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
  31. ^ McCAFFREY, JAMES (February 19, 1996). "Movie Banks on Popularity Carrying Over". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 31, 2018. Retrieved October 10, 2017.
  32. ^ Brown, Todd (December 5, 2011). "Marvel In The 90's: NICK FURY AGENT OF SHIELD Review". Twitch Film. Archived from the original on December 8, 2011. Retrieved December 9, 2011.
  33. ^ Leston, Ryan (September 4, 2013). "David Hasselhoff wants another shot at Nick Fury". Yahoo! Movies. Yahoo!. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved September 16, 2013.
  34. ^ http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=13675
  35. ^ Monfette, Christopher (September 22, 2008). "Best Buy Employs Nick Fury". IGN. News Corporation. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved September 23, 2008.
  36. ^ "THOR AND OTHER MARVEL TV SHOWS". comicbookresources. 2001. Retrieved September 29, 2018.
  37. ^ "CBR.com – The World's Top Destination For Comic, Movie & TV news". Comic Book Resources. March 28, 2001.
  38. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on February 10, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2018.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  39. ^ Whitbrook, James. "Misty Knight Is Coming to Iron Fist's Second Season to Show Danny Rand What's What". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on July 26, 2018. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  40. ^ Jobst, Marc (director); Matt Owens (writer) (June 22, 2018). "Wig Out". Marvel's Luke Cage. Season 2. Episode 3. Netflix.
  41. ^ Brodesser, Claude; Dunkley, Cathy (August 12, 2001). "Par, Nick take 'Kid' for ride". Daily Variety. Archived from the original on August 14, 2018. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  42. ^ "'Night Thrasher' becomes UPN's primetime hero". IMDb. Archived from the original on March 28, 2017. Retrieved December 30, 2017.
  43. ^ "CBR.com – The World's Top Destination For Comic, Movie & TV news". Comic Book Resources. October 30, 2002. Archived from the original on August 12, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2017.
  44. ^ "SCI FI Adapts Marvel Series". Sci Fi Wire (Sci Fi Channel). January 3, 2003. Archived from the original on February 8, 2003. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  45. ^ Allstetter, Rob (March 3, 2003). "CROSSGEN'S TV/MOVIE SLATE". comicscontinuum. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved August 17, 2010.
  46. ^ Anderson, Laurie J. (June 1, 2003). "The Crossovers #4: Cross Currents Part 4". Sequential Tart. Archived from the original on November 3, 2015. Retrieved September 3, 2010. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  47. ^ Marvel Reports 3Q Earnings Archived September 29, 2007, at the Wayback Machine, Newsarama, November 6, 2006
  48. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 29, 2007. Retrieved December 31, 2018.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), Newsarama, November 6, 2006
  49. ^ Schneider, Micheak (December 17, 2010). "Screenwriter Sets Marvel Adaptation for TV". Variety. Archived from the original on February 6, 2014. Retrieved December 17, 2010.
  50. ^ Goldman, Eric (October 25, 2006), "Moon Knight TV Series in Development Archived February 12, 2020, at the Wayback Machine", IGN (accessed April 12, 2006)
  51. ^ "The Java Hut" Archived 2012-02-20 at the Wayback Machine 10 June 2008.
  52. ^ Couch, Aaron (August 23, 2019). "Marvel Confirms 3 New Disney+ Series Including 'She-Hulk' and 'Moon Knight'". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  53. ^ Melrose, Kevin (February 6, 2009). "Bendis confirms Powers TV series headed to FX". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on July 24, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  54. ^ Melrose, Kevin (February 25, 2011). "FX Greenlights Powers Pilot". Spinoff. Archived from the original on July 24, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  55. ^ Ching, Albert (May 7, 2011). "Charles S. Dutton First Official Powers Cast Member". Newsarama. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  56. ^ Ching, Albert (June 15, 2011). "Bendis Says Powers Pilot Is 'Filming In Just A Few Weeks'". Newsarama. Archived from the original on June 23, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  57. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (June 20, 2011). "Lucy Punch Set As The Female Lead In FX's Drama Pilot Powers". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on July 24, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  58. ^ a b Porter, Rick (June 21, 2011). "FX's Powers pilot packs a (Lucy) Punch". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on July 3, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  59. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (June 21, 2011). "Jason Patric Set To Star In FX's Powers". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on July 26, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  60. ^ Hibberd, James (June 22, 2011). "Jason Patric speaks out on FX's Powers role". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on July 27, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  61. ^ Lesnick, Silas (June 26, 2011). "Will go from T-Mobile Girl to RetroGirl". SuperHeroHype. Archived from the original on July 26, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  62. ^ Filipponi, Pietro (June 26, 2011). "Powers TV Series Taps T-Mobile Model Carly Foulkes for Role of RetroGirl". The Daily Blam. Archived from the original on July 30, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  63. ^ Filipponi, Pietro (July 8, 2011). "First Photo from the Set of FX's New TV Series Powers". The Daily Blam. Archived from the original on July 12, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  64. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (November 17, 2011). "FX Passes On Pilot Outlaw Country, Will Retool Powers". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on December 21, 2011. Retrieved December 10, 2011.
  65. ^ Brian Michael Bendis (November 17, 2011). "@BRIANMBENDIS status". Retrieved December 10, 2011 – via Twitter.
  66. ^ Pantozzi, Jill (April 9, 2012). "Good News? The Powers TV Show Is Starting Over". The Mary Sue. Archived from the original on April 14, 2012. Retrieved April 27, 2012.
  67. ^ Franich, Darren (June 9, 2014). "Powers: Comic book TV show coming to Playstation Network in December". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on June 11, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2014.
  68. ^ Amol, Sharma (March 19, 2014). "Sony to Add Original TV Shows for PlayStation". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on March 22, 2014. Retrieved March 22, 2014.
  69. ^ Bendis, Brian. "Powers Premieres March 10th, Only on PlayStation". PlayStation. Archived from the original on May 6, 2016. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  70. ^ a b Daniels, Hunter (July 23, 2011). "Comic-Con: Marvel TV Announces Development Slate; Includes Live-Action Development Slate; Includes Live-Action A.k.a. Jessica Jones (Alias), The Hulk, Cloak and Dagger, Mockingbird, Animated Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H, More". Collider. Archived from the original on August 22, 2015. Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  71. ^ Watts, Steve (November 19, 2015). "Captain Marvel's Carol Danvers Was Originally on Jessica Jones". IGN. Archived from the original on November 20, 2015. Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  72. ^ Strom, Marc (October 2, 2014). "Declassifying Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: A Hen in the Wolf House". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on January 5, 2015. Retrieved January 5, 2015.
  73. ^ Wallenstein, Andrew (October 20, 2011). "ABC Studios sells scripts tapping music and Marvel". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. Archived from the original on January 25, 2012. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  74. ^ Chitwood, Adam (May 15, 2012). "Hulk May Be on ABC Next Year; The Punisher TV Series Not Moving Forward at Fox". Collider.com. Archived from the original on January 8, 2020. Retrieved July 24, 2015.
  75. ^ Patten, Dominic (October 19, 2017). "'Marvel's The Punisher' Gets November Premiere Date & Trailer on Netflix". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Media Corporation. Archived from the original on October 19, 2017. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  76. ^ Goldberg, Lesley (February 17, 2015). "Comic Book Legend Jim Starlin to Adapt 'Dreadstar' for TV". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on April 14, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  77. ^ McNary, Dave (May 21, 2015). "Cannes: George A. Romero's 'Empire of the Dead' Set for TV Series". Variety. Archived from the original on February 2, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  78. ^ Barkan, Jonathan (November 9, 2015). "George Romero's "Empire of the Dead" Confirmed For AMC". BD. Archived from the original on February 22, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  79. ^ "Fox in Development on 'Hellfire' (Working Title)". Marvel.com. October 14, 2015. Archived from the original on October 14, 2015. Retrieved October 14, 2015.
  80. ^ Andreeva, Natalie (October 14, 2015). "'X-Men' Marvel TV Dramas Set: FX Orders 'Legion' Pilot, Fox Developing 'Hellfire'". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on October 15, 2015. Retrieved October 14, 2015.
  81. ^ Topel, Fred (January 15, 2016). "'X-Men' Spinoff 'Hellfire Club' May Premiere Early 2017; Plus a Minor 'Rambo' Update". /Film. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  82. ^ Wagmeister, Elizabeth (July 12, 2016). "Marvel 'X-Men' Series from Matt Nix, Bryan Singer Lands Put Pilot Commitment at Fox (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Archived from the original on January 20, 2017. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  83. ^ Schwartz, Terri (January 11, 2016). "Second Marvel Comedy in Development at ABC". IGN. Archived from the original on January 11, 2016. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  84. ^ Sherwin, Adam (March 28, 2016). "Captain Britain: UK's obscure first superhero could be resurrected for TV series". The Independent. UK. Archived from the original on May 14, 2019. Retrieved May 14, 2019.
  85. ^ Malvern, Jack (March 28, 2016). "Captain Britain back from the 1970s for TV adventure". The Times. UK. Archived from the original on April 7, 2016. Retrieved May 14, 2019.
  86. ^ Lincoln, Ross A.; N'Duka, Amanda (June 10, 2016). "Marvel Comic 'Scarlet' In Development As TV Series At Cinemax – ATX TV Festival". Deadline. Archived from the original on March 2, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  87. ^ Travis, Ben; Hewitt, Chris (June 8, 2018). "Kick-Ass Reboot and Kingsman Universe Coming from Matthew Vaughn's New Studio – EXCLUSIVE". Empire Online. Archived from the original on November 1, 2018. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  88. ^ "Uncovering Marvel's Lost '80s Cartoon Pitches – Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources". Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on September 22, 2015. Retrieved November 9, 2015.
  89. ^ Arrant, Chris (March 6, 2013). "Uncovering Marvel's lost '80s cartoon pitches". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on September 22, 2015. There are some stalwarts there, including a swank Iron Man, a Six Million Dollar Man-esque Ant-Man, and a Daredevil show that pairs the blind attorney with a dog named Lightning.
  90. ^ a b Mark Evanier, quoted in: Cronin, Brian (March 20, 2008). "Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #147". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on April 7, 2013. Retrieved April 22, 2009.
  91. ^ Comics Feature #33 (1985), cited in: "Media: Cartoons: Proposed Daredevil Cartoon". ManWithoutFear.com. Archived from the original on April 7, 2013.
  92. ^ "Proposed Daredevil Animated Series". ToonZone. Archived from the original on January 29, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  93. ^ "X-Men #129 [UPC with Black Slash] (January 1980)". Grand Comics Database. Archived from the original on November 5, 2012. Retrieved December 2, 2011.
  94. ^ "X-Men #139 [Direct] (November 1980)". Grand Comics Database. Archived from the original on January 20, 2012. Retrieved December 2, 2011.
  95. ^ Arrant, Chris (August 11, 2016). ""MARVEL's SOLARMAN Shines Again As Creator-Owned Series"". Newsarama. Archived from the original on August 12, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2016.
  96. ^ Bendis, Brian Michael (February 1, 2015). "Original presentation piece by Jack Kirby". Tumblr. Archived from the original on November 19, 2015. Retrieved May 16, 2021.
  97. ^ Cronin, Brian (July 9, 2009). "Comic Book Legends Revealed #215". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on June 16, 2013. Retrieved June 15, 2013.
  98. ^ Meugniot, Will (n.d.). "It Almost Happened! Captain America: The Series!". StoryBoardPro.com. Archived from the original on May 30, 2008. Retrieved September 13, 2010.
  99. ^ Fletcher, Marc (August 13, 2009). "Cartoon Graveyard #5 (Captain America)". Rayguns & Sixshooters. Archived from the original on November 9, 2009. Retrieved September 13, 2010.
  100. ^ "Ungarr Talks 'Mutant X', 'Thor'". Comics Continuum. December 8, 2000. Archived from the original on October 15, 2011. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  101. ^ Dinh, Christine (May 10, 2017). "FXX Orders Adult Animated Comedy the Untitled Marvel's Deadpool Series from Marvel Television and FXP". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on May 17, 2017. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  102. ^ Yeoman, Kevin (March 24, 2018). "FX Not Moving Forward With Donald Glover's Deadpool Animated Series". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on March 25, 2018. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  103. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (March 24, 2018). "FX Pulls the Plug On Marvel's Deadpool Animated TV Series From Donald Glover". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 25, 2018. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  104. ^ Jammer Medina, Joseph (March 30, 2018). "Deadpool: A Taylor Swift Episode Apparently Led To Animated Series' Cancellation". Latino Review Media. Archived from the original on March 31, 2018. Retrieved March 30, 2018.
  105. ^ Otterson, Joe (February 11, 2019). "'Howard the Duck' Among Four Marvel Animated Shows Ordered at Hulu". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. Archived from the original on February 11, 2019. Retrieved February 11, 2019.
  106. ^ Goldberg, Lesley (January 24, 2020). "Marvel's 'Howard the Duck,' 'Tigra & Dazzler' Dead at Hulu". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 25, 2020. Retrieved January 24, 2020.

External links

Marvel-Less: 20 TV Shows Marvel Cancelled Way Too Soon on Comic Book Resources

Original content from Wikipedia, shared with licence Creative Commons By-Sa - List of unproduced television projects based on Marvel Comics