Mariupol art school bombing

Bombing of a civilian shelter during Russo-Ukrainian War

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Mariupol art school bombing
Part of the Siege of Mariupol during the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine
LocationArt School No. 12
Mariupol, Ukraine
Date20 March 2022 (2022-03-20)
TargetCivilians using the school as an air raid shelter
Attack type
Airstrike
Perpetrators Russian Armed Forces
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On 20 March 2022, Russian Armed Forces bombed Art School No. 12 in Mariupol, where hundreds of people were taking shelter during the Russian invasion of Ukraine.[2][3]

Background

On 24 February, the Russian Armed Forces, working together with pro-Russian rebels, besieged the port city of Mariupol, leading to heavy casualties as supplies such as food, gas, and electricity were cut off from the locals.[4] The mayor of Mariupol, Sergiy Orlov has estimated that 80 to 90% of the city had been destroyed due to shelling. As of 20 March, local authorities have estimated that at least 2,300 people were killed during the siege up until the bombing.[5]

Bombing

On 20 March 2022, Ukrainian authorities announced that Russian troops had bombed an art school where about 400 people were sheltering.[5] The Mariupol City Council made the announcement through the instant messaging service Telegram, highlighting that many of those sheltering in the school were women, children and elderly. However, Petro Andryushchenko, an advisor to the Mayor of Mariupol, raised the concern that there was no exact number on how many people were using the school as a refuge.[6]

References

  1. ^ https://inews.co.uk/news/world/mariupol-ukraine-theatre-bombing-killed-300-people-council-confirms-1541476
  2. ^ "Russian troops 'everywhere' in Mariupol as art school sheltering 400 is bombed". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2022-03-21.
  3. ^ "School where hundreds were believed to be sheltering is bombed in Mariupol as fighting rages for key port city". CNN. Retrieved 2022-03-21.
  4. ^ "Up to 1,200 people may have been inside the theater, the city's deputy mayor Serhiy Orlov said". RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty. Retrieved 2022-03-17.
  5. ^ a b Anna, Cara (20 March 2022). "Russia bombs Mariupol art school where 400 were sheltering, Ukraine officials say". www.timesofisrael.com. Retrieved 2022-03-21.
  6. ^ Dafoe, Taylor (2022-03-21). "Russian Forces Bombed an Art School in Ukraine, Where Hundreds of Civilians Had Taken Shelter". Artnet News. Retrieved 2022-03-23.


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