OSO Arts Centre

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OSO Arts Centre
The Old Sorting Office
OSOArtsCentre (cropped).jpg
OSO Arts Centre, Barnes Green
Address49 Station Road, Barnes
London, SW13 0LF
England, United Kingdom
Coordinates51°28′20″N 0°14′47″W / 51.4723°N 0.2465°W / 51.4723; -0.2465Coordinates: 51°28′20″N 0°14′47″W / 51.4723°N 0.2465°W / 51.4723; -0.2465
Public transitNational Rail Barnes National Rail Barnes Bridge
TypeFringe theatre
Capacity74 seats
Current useTheatre and arts centre
Opened2002; 19 years ago (2002)
Years active2002–present
Website
osoarts.org.uk

The OSO Arts Centre is a theatre and arts centre located in Barnes in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.[1] The building was previously the postal sorting office, but was redeveloped into a mixture of residential and commercial space with the first residents moving in in 1999. In 2002 the arts centre opened[2] and in 2012 the OSO Arts Centre came under the direction of a new board of trustees. The building is located on Barnes Green, and provides arts services to the community, both in the form of evening performances in the theatre[2] space, and daytime dance and art classes.[3] Some well-known names have performed at the OSO over the years including Patricia Hodge, Timothy West, Stephanie Cole, Julian Glover, and Robert Pattinson.[4]

The OSO Arts Centre hosts productions by the Barnes Community Players[5] and the Barnes Children's Literature Festival,[6] as well as performances by young theatre companies.[7]

References

  1. ^ "OSO Arts Centre". ArtsRichmond.
  2. ^ a b "OSO Community Arts Centre". VisitRichmond.
  3. ^ "The Old Sorting Office". Barnes Village.
  4. ^ "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 1". cinemareview.com. Retrieved 1 July 2020.
  5. ^ "Mrs Warren's Profession at the OSO". Richmond and Twickenham Times. 13 February 2012. Retrieved 1 July 2020.
  6. ^ Proto, Laura (22 April 2015). "Holly Willoughby to delight at inaugural Barnes Children's Literature Festival". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 1 July 2020.
  7. ^ Thompson, Jessie (8 June 2017). "First World War's final months told through six stories in new dramas". Evening Standard. Retrieved 1 July 2020.

External links

Original content from Wikipedia, shared with licence Creative Commons By-Sa - OSO Arts Centre