Terry Cummings

American basketball player

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Terry Cummings
Personal information
Born (1961-03-15) March 15, 1961 (age 60)
Chicago, Illinois
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)
Listed weight220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High schoolCarver (Chicago, Illinois)
CollegeDePaul (1979–1982)
NBA draft1982 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2nd overall
Selected by the San Diego Clippers
Playing career1982–2000
PositionPower forward
Number34, 35
Career history
19821984San Diego Clippers
19841989Milwaukee Bucks
19891995San Antonio Spurs
1995–1996Milwaukee Bucks
1996–1997Seattle SuperSonics
1997–1998Philadelphia 76ers
1998New York Knicks
19992000Golden State Warriors
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points19,460 (16.4 ppg)
Rebounds8,630 (7.3 rpg)
Steals1,255 (1.1 spg)
Stats Edit this at Wikidata at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Robert Terrell Cummings (born March 15, 1961) is an American former professional basketball player who played 18 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

College Years

Born in Chicago and a graduate of Carver High School, Cummings attended Depaul University from 1979 to 1982. He averaged 16.4 points per game over 85 games and entered the 1982 NBA draft after departing from school.

NBA

San Diego Clippers

He was selected in the first round by the San Diego Clippers as the second overall pick, right after James Worthy was by the Clippers’ eventual crosstown-rivals, the Lakers. Before the season even began, Cummings’ bumped heads with San Diego’s now-infamous owner, Donald Sterling. While Sterling had training camp conducted at a naval base, he made all players do their own laundry. As a result of that, and other tense exchanges, Cummings’ agent tried to negotiate a one-year deal to get his client away from the Clippers as soon as possible, however, the two sides eventually agreed to a four-year contract during the preseason.[1]

In his inaugural 1982–83 season, he won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award after putting up 23.7 points and 10.4 rebounds per game. These figures would turn out to be the highest of his career in those categories. Late in his rookie season, Cummings suffered from heartbeat irregularities, which would keep him out the remaining two weeks of the season. The team lost every game without him.

Milwaukee Bucks

After the next season (1983–84), he was traded to the Milwaukee Bucks, where he would continue to post above 20 points and 8 rebound averages for four out of his five years on the team.

In the 1985 NBA playoffs, Cummings (29.5 points) averaged more points than then-rookie Michael Jordan (29.3 points) in a 3-1 series victory for Milwaukee. It would be the only time Jordan would not lead all scorers in a postseason series he participated in during his career.[2] The Bucks would lose in the next round in an upset to the lower seeded Philadelphia 76ers in a 4-0 sweep.[3]

The following season, Cummings and now hall of fame-enshrined teammate Sidney Moncrief led the Bucks to a 57-25 record and a Eastern Conference Finals appearance.[4] During this postseason run on April 22, 1986, Cummings scored 23 points, grabbed 11 rebounds, and recorded a playoffs career-high 3 blocks in the final game of a 3-0 first round sweep of the New Jersey Nets.[5] However, in a familiar pattern for the 1980s Bucks, they would ultimately fail to reach the NBA Finals.

On January 9, 1987, Cummings grabbed a career high 24 rebounds, alongside scoring 28 points, in a 100-92 loss to the Washington Bullets.[6]

On May 10, 1987, Cummings scored 31 points in a Eastern Semifinals Game 4 138-137 overtime loss against the Boston Celtics.[7] The Bucks would eventually lose the series in 7 games.

As a Buck, Cummings was selected to play in the 1984–85 and 1988–89 NBA All-Star Games.

San Antonio Spurs

He was traded to the San Antonio Spurs on May 28, 1989. He was sent with a 1990 2nd round draft pick (Tony Massenburg was later selected) for Cadillac Anderson, Alvin Robertson and a 1989 2nd round draft pick (Frank Kornet was later selected).[8]

His first season in San Antonio, alongside David Robinson and Maurice Cheeks, brought a remarkable turn around, the Spurs surged from 21 wins in 1989 to 56 wins in 1990.[9]

He would remain in San Antonio for six years. His scoring and rebounding averages for the 1989–90 through 1991–92 seasons were close to 20 and 8, respectively, and he helped his team to consecutive 50-win seasons and playoff appearances. By this time, he was recognized as a reliable power forward in the league.

Cummings suffered a serious knee injury in the summer of 1992 in a casual pickup game. He would miss the first 74 regular-season games. Upon his return to the lineup, he could no longer put up near-All-Star numbers, and from then on he was used in a more suitable role as a reserve. Cummings would play in San Antonio until 1994–95.

Return to Bucks

In November 1995, he joined the Milwaukee Bucks again. He played 81 games averaging 8.0 points per game in 21 minutes of work.

Seattle Supersonics

In January 1997 he signed with the Seattle SuperSonics as a free agent. He contributed as a role player helping the Sonics reach the Western Conference Semi-finals where they lost to the Houston Rockets in 7 games.

Philadelphia 76ers

He signed with the 76ers in September 1997. He played in 44 games averaging 5.3 points per game.

New York Knicks

Just before the trade deadline in February 1998, he was traded to the New York Knicks for Herb Williams and Ron Grandison. For the New York Knicks he played in 30 games to finish the 1997-98 season and a total of 74 games combined between Philadelphia and New York.

Golden State Warriors

Before the lockout ending in 1999, he was traded by the Knicks along with John Starks and Chris Mills to the Golden State Warriors for Latrell Sprewell. He managed to play 2 seasons for the Warriors, then retired from basketball after the 1999-2000 season.

In his final season, despite serious injuries and then being 38 years old, he averaged 8.4 PPG and 4.9 RPG in just 18 minutes a night.[10]

Career summary

In 18 seasons Terry Cummings scored 19,460 points, falling just short of the 20,000 point mark, but placing him among the top 50 career scorers. He finished with averages of 16.4 points per game and 7.3 rebounds per game. He also played in 1,183 games, had 33,898 minutes, a .484 field goal percentage (8,045 for 16,628), .706 free throw percentage (3,326 for 4,711), 8,630 total rebounds (3,183 offensive, 5,447 defensive), and 1,255 steals.

Personal/post-retirement

Cummings actually wanted to be a professional hockey player growing up, and had not attempted playing competitive basketball until an unexpected high school growth-spurt.[11]

On April 4, 1985, Cummings sang the national anthem in Milwaukee before playing in a home game versus the Detroit Pistons. He received a standing ovation.[12]

In December 1989, Cummings and several Spurs teammates released a Christmas song.[13]

Cummings has been an ordained Pentecostal Minister since 1977[14] and performed service at the wedding of former teammate Sean Elliott. He has three sons, Antonio, T. J., and Shawn.

In a creative turn of his career, Cummings released an album, T.C. Finally in early 2007, of songs which he wrote, sang, and played keyboards. The album is reminiscent of the R&B/soulstyles of musicians such as Marvin Gaye, Al Green, and Sam Cooke.

NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1982–83 San Diego 70 69 36.2 .523 .000 .709 10.6 2.5 1.8 .9 23.7
1983–84 San Diego 81 80 35.9 .494 .000 .720 9.6 1.7 1.1 .7 22.9
1984–85 Milwaukee 79 78 34.5 .495 .000 .741 9.1 2.9 1.5 .8 23.6
1985–86 Milwaukee 82 82 32.5 .474 .000 .656 8.5 2.4 1.5 .6 19.8
1986–87 Milwaukee 82 77 33.8 .511 .000 .662 8.5 2.8 1.6 1.0 20.8
1987–88 Milwaukee 76 76 34.6 .485 .333 .665 7.3 2.4 1.0 .6 21.3
1988–89 Milwaukee 80 78 35.3 .467 .467 .787 8.1 2.5 1.3 .9 22.9
1989–90 San Antonio 81 78 34.8 .475 .322 .780 8.4 2.7 1.4 .6 22.4
1990–91 San Antonio 67 62 32.8 .484 .212 .683 7.8 2.3 .9 .4 17.6
1991–92 San Antonio 70 67 30.7 .488 .385 .711 9.0 1.5 .8 .5 17.3
1992–93 San Antonio 8 0 9.5 .379 .500 2.4 .5 .1 .1 3.4
1993–94 San Antonio 59 29 19.2 .428 .000 .589 5.0 .8 .5 .2 7.3
1994–95 San Antonio 76 20 16.8 .483 .585 5.0 .8 .5 .3 6.8
1995–96 Milwaukee 81 13 21.9 .462 .143 .650 5.5 1.1 .7 .4 8.0
1996–97 Seattle 45 3 18.4 .486 .600 .695 4.1 .9 .7 .2 8.2
1997–98 Philadelphia 44 2 14.9 .458 .000 .672 3.4 .5 .5 .1 5.3
1997–98 New York 30 1 17.6 .477 .700 4.5 .9 .5 .2 7.8
1998–99 Golden State 50 0 20.2 .439 1.000 .711 5.1 1.2 .9 .2 9.1
1999–00 Golden State 22 0 18.1 .429 .821 4.9 1.0 .6 .4 8.4
Career 1,183 815 28.7 .484 .295 .706 7.3 1.9 1.1 .5 16.4
All-Star 2 0 17.5 .423 .833 6.0 .5 1.5 1.0 13.5

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1985 Milwaukee 8 8 38.9 .577 .000 .828 8.8 2.5 1.5 .9 27.5
1986 Milwaukee 14 14 36.4 .514 .694 9.9 3.0 1.4 1.1 21.6
1987 Milwaukee 12 10 36.9 .488 .687 7.9 2.3 1.0 1.1 22.3
1988 Milwaukee 5 5 38.6 .562 .659 7.8 2.6 1.8 .6 25.8
1989 Milwaukee 5 4 24.8 .362 .000 .875 6.6 1.4 .6 .0 12.8
1990 San Antonio 10 10 37.5 .528 .200 .808 9.4 2.2 .7 .4 24.9
1991 San Antonio 4 4 31.0 .510 .000 .500 9.3 1.0 .8 .5 14.8
1992 San Antonio 3 3 40.7 .515 .000 .500 11.3 2.3 1.3 1.3 26.0
1993 San Antonio 10 0 13.8 .443 .000 .625 3.9 .5 .3 .1 6.7
1994 San Antonio 4 1 18.0 .500 .833 6.3 .5 1.3 .8 8.0
1995 San Antonio 15 2 9.0 .375 .000 .733 2.1 .3 .3 .1 3.9
1997 Seattle 12 6 24.3 .489 .667 6.0 1.2 .9 .5 8.8
1998 New York 8 1 15.0 .441 .250 4.4 .6 .5 .3 4.0
Career 110 68 26.9 .502 .091 .706 6.7 1.6 .9 .6 15.1

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.clipsnation.com/2020/5/4/21243313/clippers-history-best-player-number-34-terry-cummings-san-diego-rookie-of-the-year
  2. ^ https://www.basketballnetwork.net/the-only-man-to-outscore-michael-jordan-in-a-playoff-series/
  3. ^ https://stathead.com/basketball/rivals.cgi?request=1&team_id=MIL&opp_id=PHI&is_playoffs=Y
  4. ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/teams/MIL/1986.html
  5. ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/boxscores/198604220NJN.html
  6. ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/boxscores/198701090MIL.html
  7. ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/boxscores/198705100MIL.html
  8. ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/players/c/cummite01.html#all_transactions
  9. ^ https://prohoopshistory.substack.com/p/terry-cummings
  10. ^ https://prohoopshistory.substack.com/p/terry-cummings
  11. ^ https://prohoopshistory.substack.com/p/terry-cummings
  12. ^ http://youtube.com/watch?v=kavxuyAZyOM
  13. ^ https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1989-12-19-8903190699-story,amp.html
  14. ^ Rzeppa, Brian. "Inside The League (6): A TLN Exclusive Interview With Future Hall Of Famer Terry Cummings". Interview. The League News. Retrieved July 2, 2013.

External links

Original content from Wikipedia, shared with licence Creative Commons By-Sa - Terry Cummings